Pit bull attack.

Pit bull attack.

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  #11  
Old 03-13-2019, 04:33 PM
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CWGUY CWGUY is offline
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Originally Posted by BK001 View Post
And the "Best Post of the Day Award" goes to:






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  #12  
Old 03-13-2019, 04:47 PM
Jazuela Jazuela is offline
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Originally Posted by graciegirl View Post
Judge Judy has many, many, cases that involve dogs on her show and the law is the same almost everywhere, that you are liable for your animal and it needs to be leashed when in public. Recently she, who is a dog lover, has been saying that Pitt Bulls are dangerous and unpredictable.

I won't mention names either but one of the sweetest and most fair posters on this site, who loves animals dearly, once said that Pitt Bulls (Staffordshire Terriers) had a different bite mechanism and behavior from most other dogs in that when the bite they clamped down and hurt by shaking the other animal. I am a dog lover but what I have heard and read and the fact that actuaries give them a greater risk makes me wary of them. I think some dogs shouldn't be bred.

And some humans too.
1. Judge Judy...seriously?
2. The context of this thread is not about a dog not being leashed in public. It's about a dog on a leash, being led to private property, where two dogs legally reside within the dwelling on that private property. The leashed dog, who was a visitor, uninvited, was attacked on private property by the dogs that have legal residence on that property.

In the OP, there is no mention that the dogs ever left private property, with or without a leash.

3. The "lockjaw" mechanism of pitbulls is an urban legend. It is not true. In addition, the biting and shaking behavior is common for all species of dog, it's not specific to pits, or even specific to guard dogs, or trained dogs, or agressive dogs. You can even buy tug-o-war toys in all pet stores to accommodate play with this behavior. The toys are sized for all types and varieties of dogs, from miniature chihuahuas to Cane Corsos and everything inbetween.

4. Pit bulls (one t - unless you're referring to Brad) are not only Staffordshire Terriors. Pit bull is a category that includes four different breeds of terrior/bull mixes, with a fifth considered by some dog fanciers. According to Wikipedia:
Quote:
American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bully, and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.[2][3] The American Bulldog is also sometimes included.[4]
Most of this stuff you can easily find with a google search.
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  #13  
Old 03-13-2019, 04:55 PM
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graciegirl graciegirl is offline
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Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
1. Judge Judy...seriously?
2. The context of this thread is not about a dog not being leashed in public. It's about a dog on a leash, being led to private property, where two dogs legally reside within the dwelling on that private property. The leashed dog, who was a visitor, uninvited, was attacked on private property by the dogs that have legal residence on that property.

In the OP, there is no mention that the dogs ever left private property, with or without a leash.

3. The "lockjaw" mechanism of pitbulls is an urban legend. It is not true. In addition, the biting and shaking behavior is common for all species of dog, it's not specific to pits, or even specific to guard dogs, or trained dogs, or agressive dogs. You can even buy tug-o-war toys in all pet stores to accommodate play with this behavior. The toys are sized for all types and varieties of dogs, from miniature chihuahuas to Cane Corsos and everything inbetween.

4. Pit bulls (one t - unless you're referring to Brad) are not only Staffordshire Terriors. Pit bull is a category that includes four different breeds of terrior/bull mixes, with a fifth considered by some dog fanciers. According to Wikipedia:


Most of this stuff you can easily find with a google search.
Yes. Judge Judy. Seriously. I enjoy her program very much and Tal was asking about opinions of the breed.

Here is his quote in the third or fourth post above; "I am trying to get the talk onto stereotypes about pit bulls as I have had a lot of talks with Villagers and those outside of it who lump all pit bulls together. Each dog is an individual even if with animals instincts and genes do play a big role IMHO."

I will jump in with the opinion that it looks to me like science is pointing to a lot of behavior being genetic, human and animal. Not to rule out that behavioral modification can well modify behavior...SOME.

I have never met a golden retriever that wasn't goofy and loveable and sweet.

Or a cat who wasn't quite a bit of a narcissist. I do love them though.
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Last edited by graciegirl; 03-13-2019 at 05:03 PM.
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  #14  
Old 03-13-2019, 05:05 PM
Jazuela Jazuela is offline
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It's not a singular breed. And your opinion seems to be based on faulty information. Aggressive pit bulls are aggressive because they're either a) trained to be aggressive b) treated as aggressive animals or c) incorrectly trained/inadvertently or intentionally mistreated. Some of them become the result of however they're treated, even if they're not specifically trained that way. This is true for all dogs. Every single one of them. Pit bulls get the bad rap because they are the most prolific in "ermagerd dog bite story of the week" and the most commonly used in dog fighting. Of all the dogs I've ever been exposed to in my life, the only one I've actually been concerned about biting me was a really unfriendly, spoiled, poorly trained chihuahua.
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  #15  
Old 03-13-2019, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
It's not a singular breed. And your opinion seems to be based on faulty information. Aggressive pit bulls are aggressive because they're either a) trained to be aggressive b) treated as aggressive animals or c) incorrectly trained/inadvertently or intentionally mistreated. Some of them become the result of however they're treated, even if they're not specifically trained that way. This is true for all dogs. Every single one of them. Pit bulls get the bad rap because they are the most prolific in "ermagerd dog bite story of the week" and the most commonly used in dog fighting. Of all the dogs I've ever been exposed to in my life, the only one I've actually been concerned about biting me was a really unfriendly, spoiled, poorly trained chihuahua.
Pit Bull Behaviors | PetCareRx

I hear your opinion and still will give a Pittbull wide berth and I would have a FIT and a BAD SPELL if any were around the little children I love.

Making up our own minds is one of the wonderful things about being older and...….I have a few years on you. Which could mean I have picked up a little knowledge and experience OR I am losing brain cells.
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  #16  
Old 03-13-2019, 05:10 PM
Edjkoz Edjkoz is offline
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Pit bulls are nice until they’re not
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  #17  
Old 03-13-2019, 05:40 PM
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I know nothing about this breed nor do I have a dog in this fight (groan - couldn't resist). However I find it interesting that:

According to the source cited at the bottom of this post:

"In the 13-year period of 2005 through 2017, canines killed 433 Americans. Pit bulls contributed to 66% (284) of these deaths. Combined, pit bulls and rottweilers contributed to 76% of the total recorded deaths." . . . Of these deaths, 53% involved a family member and a household pit bull.4 Notably, in the first 8 months of 2011, nearly half of those killed by a pit bull was its owner.

"The pit bull's genetic traits are not in dispute. Many appellate courts agree that pit bulls pose a significant danger to society and can be regulated accordingly. Some of the genetic traits courts have identified include: unpredictability of aggression, tenacity ("gameness" the refusal to give up a fight), high pain tolerance and the pit bull's "hold and shake" bite style.2 According to forensic medical studies, similar injuries have only been found elsewhere on victims of shark attacks."

"Over 900 U.S. cities have enacted breed-specific legislation. Cities such as Denver, which resides within a state containing a state preemption law, have effectively implemented these laws as well."

See: Breed-Specific Laws State-by-State
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Last edited by BK001; 03-13-2019 at 05:50 PM.
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  #18  
Old 03-13-2019, 06:00 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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Sounds like pit bulls need a publicity campaign manager, because I think that many people really don't believe that they are as harmless as other breeds.
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  #19  
Old 03-13-2019, 06:15 PM
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Sounds like pit bulls need a publicity campaign manager, because I think that many people really don't believe that they are as harmless as other breeds.
Well here is a bit of good press. From U.K. and this "Staffie" has found a good home. I admit to thinking ...What a sweet dog. In the last picture, I think he is smiling.

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  #20  
Old 03-13-2019, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
It's not a singular breed. And your opinion seems to be based on faulty information. Aggressive pit bulls are aggressive because they're either a) trained to be aggressive b) treated as aggressive animals or c) incorrectly trained/inadvertently or intentionally mistreated. Some of them become the result of however they're treated, even if they're not specifically trained that way. This is true for all dogs. Every single one of them. Pit bulls get the bad rap because they are the most prolific in "ermagerd dog bite story of the week" and the most commonly used in dog fighting. Of all the dogs I've ever been exposed to in my life, the only one I've actually been concerned about biting me was a really unfriendly, spoiled, poorly trained chihuahua.
My big fear has been chihuahuas as one would run at me every time I walked by their enclosed yard like I was breakfast, lunch and dinner. I had to walk to high school as the bus route started about 1/8 of a mile from where we lived in Reno, Nevada.

Now we have had two wonderful chihuahua/terrier mixes even though when I heard that the Humane Society was bringing over a chihuahua for possible adoption I was dead set against it until I saw the dog. This was around 2007 and we have had chihuahua/terriers since.

We had a cocker spaniel before that named Amber which is a very sweet breed but has a lot of in-bred problems. She made the journey from Sonoma County, CA to Palm Harbor, FL in 1996.

The dog that got bit in this story is a cocker spaniel. My dog does not like it when he licks him in the face. So I keep them away from one another.

We had a Dalmation before the cocker spaniel who would get very protective of anyone it was sharing a bed with to the point of biting you. Kind of a very nutty dog. Hyperactive, neurotic and hard of hearing.
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