Pit bull attack.

Pit bull attack.

Notices

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 03-13-2019, 07:10 PM
Jazuela Jazuela is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 405
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
Sounds like pit bulls need a publicity campaign manager, because I think that many people really don't believe that they are as harmless as other breeds.
Other breeds aren't "harmless." ALL dog breeds have the capacity and potential to be dangerous. Some are bred to be stronger than others. Some are bred to be more agile, more attentive, more focused. And some of -those- that have been specifically bred to be stronger, more agile, more attentive, and more focused, have also been -trained- to be aggressive. You put that combination together in a salad bowl and you have a victim just waiting to be bit.

The statistics in a subsequent post don't account for what the victim was doing at the time of the attack against him/her. If a dog is killing its owner, then its owner did something wrong. Either through bad training, bad treatment, their own bad behavior, or just flat out lack of respect for the animal's power.

Some people will take a rescue pit home, thinking they can change them and be the next Caesar Milan. Some of those people realize that they aren't, and will never be the next Caesar Milan. And some, sadly, don't realize that til the damage is already done. That is the fault of the person, not the dog.

Just like - it's a bad idea to have a staring contest with a rottweiler (bet a lot of you didn't know that) - it's also a bad idea to behave in a way that an animal trained to kill might misunderstand or misinterpret.
Reply With Quote

  #22  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:22 PM
B-flat B-flat is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: North of 466
Posts: 203
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BK001 View Post
And the "Best Post of the Day Award" goes to:





Plus one. Strictly my opinaion here, I will add I haveno use for pit bulls. I never heard of a Golden Retriever, Bichon or Labradoodle attacking a person or another dog. Pit bulls should not be bred.
__________________
One Day At A Time
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #23  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:33 PM
Boomer Boomer is online now
Soaring Parsley
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,677
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
Sounds like pit bulls need a publicity campaign manager, because I think that many people really don't believe that they are as harmless as other breeds.
Oh, but, rg123, I think pit bulls already had a campaign manager — Cesar Millan — who made a lot of people think they needed to save a pit bull. Too many people can become completely enchanted with what their screens are telling them to believe.

Now, here we are with rescue organizations and pounds having a big percentage of pit bulls.

I know someone who worked for a large insurance company who told me the majority of dog attack claims are from encounters with pit bulls.

Nature? Nurture?

Just like with people it is both. But Nature is in there from the start.

For instance, many years ago, we had a beautiful Brittany spaniel. We were looking for a middle-sized dog and I really like floppy, curly ears so we chose a Brittany. She cost us 50 bucks — it was a long, long time ago. (I was still cute and drove a Triumph. (sigh)) But, I digress.

Anyway, we did not hunt birds. Never did. Never will. But that gorgeous Brittany (orange and white) naturally sniffed for birds, and, all-the-time, would go into a perfect point that she could hold forever. (She looked like a bird dog in a painting.)

We did not teach her to do that. We were so dumb, we did not even realize we had bought ourselves a descendent of field champions. We just wanted a cute puppy that would grow into a middle-sized dog.

My point is that she was responding to her nature, even though sometimes, in our yard, she had to deign to pointing squirrels.

She probably thought we were big losers for wasting her gifts, but she had a happy long life as a house dog that got to go outside to sniff and play a lot.

My Brittany spaniel manual said, “The Brittany is at home at the hearth, as well as at the hunt.” She got hearth, as well as air-conditioning, though she never got to hunt for real. But we tried to let her enjoy her nature whenever we could. She was a joy to see in that perfect point. That she was never trained to do.

Every dog breed has its history and nature. Of course nurture is important. But we did not train our Brittany to point.. She surprised the heck out of us the first time she did it.

Pit bulls are naturally strong of body and jaw and tenacious and far too unpredictable for me. I am afraid of them.


PS:Thank you for reading my nostalgic recollection of a Brittany spaniel who taught herself to point and also loved to ride around with me in my Triumph. (sigh)

Last edited by Boomer; 03-14-2019 at 12:10 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:36 PM
Topspinmo's Avatar
Topspinmo Topspinmo is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Oregon Mo. St Joesph mo, ft worth tx, Omaha neb., upper heyford UK, Clovis NM, OKC.
Posts: 4,015
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taltarzac725 View Post
I have a long term acquaintance whose dog was ripped up quite badly ($1200 worth of wounds that needed fixing by Buffalo Ridge Vets) by two pit bulls. This was though while he was trying to return a cell phone to his neighbors who opened the door when this guy knocked or rang the bell. The acquaintance had taken the dog to the pit bulls' house. And they attacked viciously. One of the owners of the pit bulls did get hurt trying to pull these two dogs off of the much smaller dog.

Please keep the details out of this any more than this if you know whom I am talking about here.

Just wanted to talk more about pit bulls some of whom get a bad rap. I have met maybe a couple dozen pit bulls that are a lot sweeter than most of the small dogs I have met.

The dog that got attacked is an extremely gentle pooch. Not a mean gene in its body.

Other pit bulls if I am not familiar with them I avoid as much as possible as there are very nasty pit bulls out there. But these have usually been mistreated or trained to kill other dogs for the amusement of their owners and money for various parties.

My sister-in-law's family has often had pit bulls and she adopted what looked like a pit bull/boxer mix last year from Max's Pet Connection in Lady Lake. She throws all kind of love at their dog as does the rest of her family.
H
I do have a female friend who had a gentle pit bull mix that did eventually get a bit aggressive when it would play rough with a boxer mix. The dog never harmed another dog though as far as I know.

My neighbor in Palm Harbor raised two pit bulls and was in hot water with the authorities for mistreating one of these dogs. Both of which were quite gentle but he kept them in cages. He had tied one to his car and tried to walk it in the neighborhood from a leash out his car's window. The cops followed the blood trial to his house after a teen called 911.

This neighbor fought to get the pit bull back from the authorities. There was a lot of resistance in the community and this did make the various Tampa Bay news stations and newspapers.
But, small dog can’t bit dog in half and mull some one to death. Pits bulls have jaws of steal, once they clamp down like snapping turtle, you practically have to cut there head offs to get them loose. Yes some are not aggressive, but, like loaded old Remington 700 you don’t know what will set it off. Knowing that the neighbors had two pit bulls I would never take dog close to they’re domaine.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:38 PM
Topspinmo's Avatar
Topspinmo Topspinmo is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Oregon Mo. St Joesph mo, ft worth tx, Omaha neb., upper heyford UK, Clovis NM, OKC.
Posts: 4,015
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer View Post
Oh, but, rg123, I think pit bulls already had a campaign manager — Cesar Millan — who made a lot of people think they needed to save a pit bull. Too many people can become completely enchanted with what their screens are telling them to believe.

Now, here we are with rescue organizations and pounds having a big percentage of pit bulls.

I know someone who worked for a large insurance company who told me the majority of dog attack claims are from encounters with pit bulls.

Nature? Nurture?

Just like with people it is both. But Nature is in there from the start.

For instance, many years ago, we had a beautiful Brittany spaniel. We were looking for a middle-sized dog and I really like floppy, curly, ears so we chose a Brittany. She cost us 50 bucks — it was a long, long time ago. (I was still cute and drove a Triumph. (sigh)) But, I digress.

Anyway, we did not hunt birds. Never did. Never will. But that gorgeous Brittany (orange and white) naturally sniffed for birds, and, all-the-time, would go into a perfect point that she could hold forever. (She looked like a bird dog in a painting.)

We did not teach her to do that. We were so dumb, we did not even realize we had bought ourselves a descendent of field champions. We just wanted a cute puppy that would grow into a middle-sized dog.

My point is that she was responding to her nature, even though sometimes, in our yard, she had to deign to pointing squirrels.

She probably thought we were big losers for wasting her gifts, but she had a happy long life as a house dog that got to go outside to sniff and play a lot.

My Brittany spaniel manual said, “The Brittany is at home at the hearth, as well as at the hunt.” She got hearth, as well as air-conditioning. But we tried to let her enjoy her nature whenever we could. She was a joy to see in that perfect point. That she was never trained to do.

Every dog breed has its history and nature. Of course nurture is important. But we did not train our Brittany to point.. She surprised the heck out of us the first time she did it.

Pit bulls are naturally strong of body and jaw and tenacious and far too unpredictable for me. I am askeered of ‘em.


PS:Thank you for reading my nostalgic recollection of a Brittany spaniel who taught herself to point and also loved to ride around with me in my Triumph. (sigh)
99% of dog owners are not dog whisperers.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:40 PM
Topspinmo's Avatar
Topspinmo Topspinmo is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Oregon Mo. St Joesph mo, ft worth tx, Omaha neb., upper heyford UK, Clovis NM, OKC.
Posts: 4,015
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by B-flat View Post
Plus one. Strictly my opinaion here, I will add I haveno use for pit bulls. I never heard of a Golden Retriever, Bichon or Labradoodle attacking a person or another dog. Pit bulls should not be bred.
They do, but rarely kill someone or chew their face off.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:46 PM
Topspinmo's Avatar
Topspinmo Topspinmo is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Oregon Mo. St Joesph mo, ft worth tx, Omaha neb., upper heyford UK, Clovis NM, OKC.
Posts: 4,015
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
1. Judge Judy...seriously?
2. The context of this thread is not about a dog not being leashed in public. It's about a dog on a leash, being led to private property, where two dogs legally reside within the dwelling on that private property. The leashed dog, who was a visitor, uninvited, was attacked on private property by the dogs that have legal residence on that property.

In the OP, there is no mention that the dogs ever left private property, with or without a leash.

3. The "lockjaw" mechanism of pitbulls is an urban legend. It is not true. In addition, the biting and shaking behavior is common for all species of dog, it's not specific to pits, or even specific to guard dogs, or trained dogs, or agressive dogs. You can even buy tug-o-war toys in all pet stores to accommodate play with this behavior. The toys are sized for all types and varieties of dogs, from miniature chihuahuas to Cane Corsos and everything inbetween.

4. Pit bulls (one t - unless you're referring to Brad) are not only Staffordshire Terriors. Pit bull is a category that includes four different breeds of terrior/bull mixes, with a fifth considered by some dog fanciers. According to Wikipedia:


Most of this stuff you can easily find with a google search.
If they escaped out the door They was in violation of leash laws. You’re front door without fenced yard and sign that says do not enter killer dogs is public access. Even then, you can’t stop someone from coming to front door, you don’t have answer it, but they have legal right to enter and knock.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 03-13-2019, 09:02 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 37,719
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
Other breeds aren't "harmless." ALL dog breeds have the capacity and potential to be dangerous. Some are bred to be stronger than others. Some are bred to be more agile, more attentive, more focused. And some of -those- that have been specifically bred to be stronger, more agile, more attentive, and more focused, have also been -trained- to be aggressive. You put that combination together in a salad bowl and you have a victim just waiting to be bit.

The statistics in a subsequent post don't account for what the victim was doing at the time of the attack against him/her. If a dog is killing its owner, then its owner did something wrong. Either through bad training, bad treatment, their own bad behavior, or just flat out lack of respect for the animal's power.

Some people will take a rescue pit home, thinking they can change them and be the next Caesar Milan. Some of those people realize that they aren't, and will never be the next Caesar Milan. And some, sadly, don't realize that til the damage is already done. That is the fault of the person, not the dog.

Just like - it's a bad idea to have a staring contest with a rottweiler (bet a lot of you didn't know that) - it's also a bad idea to behave in a way that an animal trained to kill might misunderstand or misinterpret.
I do see some interesting stuff written by Cesar Milan about pit bulls. Why I love pit bulls | Cesar's Way
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 03-13-2019, 09:33 PM
CFrance's Avatar
CFrance CFrance is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Tamarind Grove/Monpazier, France
Posts: 12,496
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer View Post
Oh, but, rg123, I think pit bulls already had a campaign manager — Cesar Millan — who made a lot of people think they needed to save a pit bull. Too many people can become completely enchanted with what their screens are telling them to believe.

Now, here we are with rescue organizations and pounds having a big percentage of pit bulls.

I know someone who worked for a large insurance company who told me the majority of dog attack claims are from encounters with pit bulls.

Nature? Nurture?

Just like with people it is both. But Nature is in there from the start.

For instance, many years ago, we had a beautiful Brittany spaniel. We were looking for a middle-sized dog and I really like floppy, curly ears so we chose a Brittany. She cost us 50 bucks — it was a long, long time ago. (I was still cute and drove a Triumph. (sigh)) But, I digress.

Anyway, we did not hunt birds. Never did. Never will. But that gorgeous Brittany (orange and white) naturally sniffed for birds, and, all-the-time, would go into a perfect point that she could hold forever. (She looked like a bird dog in a painting.)

We did not teach her to do that. We were so dumb, we did not even realize we had bought ourselves a descendent of field champions. We just wanted a cute puppy that would grow into a middle-sized dog.

My point is that she was responding to her nature, even though sometimes, in our yard, she had to deign to pointing squirrels.

She probably thought we were big losers for wasting her gifts, but she had a happy long life as a house dog that got to go outside to sniff and play a lot.

My Brittany spaniel manual said, “The Brittany is at home at the hearth, as well as at the hunt.” She got hearth, as well as air-conditioning, though she never got to hunt for real. But we tried to let her enjoy her nature whenever we could. She was a joy to see in that perfect point. That she was never trained to do.

Every dog breed has its history and nature. Of course nurture is important. But we did not train our Brittany to point.. She surprised the heck out of us the first time she did it.

Pit bulls are naturally strong of body and jaw and tenacious and far too unpredictable for me. I am askeered of ‘em.


PS:Thank you for reading my nostalgic recollection of a Brittany spaniel who taught herself to point and also loved to ride around with me in my Triumph. (sigh)
Unbelievable. We had a Springer Spaniel who so loved riding around with me in my Triumph (TR6) that he wouldn't get out of the car if he deemed the ride too short. And my husband's family's dog from the pound, Boots, once pointed into their refrigerator.


Okay, carry on.
__________________
Happiness is when your life on the outside matches your life on the inside.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:00 PM
Chi-Town's Avatar
Chi-Town Chi-Town is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 5,606
Default

Pit bulls are the dogs of choice of gang members, and I'm not talking about Petey from Our Gang.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pit, bulls, dog, acquaintance, attacked

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:47 AM.