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  #11  
Old 10-12-2017, 08:29 AM
Investment Painting Contractors Investment Painting Contractors is offline
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I agree with gracie call Frank. In your 2:59 post you stated you had serious structural issues, you better call someone Quick.
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  #12  
Old 10-12-2017, 10:21 AM
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Thank you for the kind words. I appreciate it.

Just for the record, I do not know the gentleman who posted this thread....I did not do this inspection. We are usually so busy doing warranty inspections that it is often very difficult for us to fit in "new buyer" type inspections. We do our best, but the feverish pace of The Villages growth usually does not leave us time to do specific problem inspections.

Just a few random thoughts....

Usually a home inspection carefully checks the roof for obvious leaks, signs of damage or improper installation, wear, etc. As the inspection is typically not invasive, we do not remove shingles to check nailing patterns, etc. There ARE many issues we sometimes find on a roof, and when found are documented with pictures and video if needed.

It has been my experience that in Florida, roofs will rarely last more than 15-20 years. The new homeowner stated that the home was 12 years old, so I would assume this was the original roof. I have seen 12 year old roofs look pretty good, and after checking for them to be sealed down, etc. MAY last another few years. No matter what, I would tell the client that it may be wise to budget for a new roof within the next 5 years or so. A 12 year old roof will have some degree of granular loss, brittleness, etc.

Then we have a category one hurricane come over our homes....an unprecedented event. NEW homes with NEW roofs, even if correctly installed, in some cases had damage. How a 12 year old roof fared could vary.....my experience has been that many older roofs had no damage, but some of course did....even new roofs.

The term, "insurable roof" is something I have never heard. An Inspector documents the roof age and condition. In all my years experience I have not ever heard of an Inspector deeming a roof insurable or not, as different insurance companies have different standards. I know a few years ago State Farm would not insure ANY roof older than 5 years old. So...to them this roof , (at least a few years ago) would not be insurable. To many other Insurance companies it probably would have. An inspector would have no say or even any knowledge if a specific insurance company would insure a home.....that is up to the insurance company of course, not an inspector.

There is a lot we do not know from this post. Was there installation problems? Was the work sub standard? If so, what were the defects, and were they observable?

Inspectors have an ethical obligation to the potential buyer. They work for the potential buyer...not a Realtor or anyone else. The potential buyer should have had an established working relationship with no one "in between". I know it is not always possible, but I always recommend that the client be at the inspection.

Also, something was mentioned about the inspector returning with tools. He might have been doing a wind mitigation report.....but a good inspector would never be doing repairs or fixing anything. That if done would be unethical and against our standards.

Anyway, Again, I do not know anyone involved here. I do not know who the inspector was here and would not want to know. I always try to be helpful here and the thread interested me, so I thought I would try to be helpful and share a few thoughts.

Without seeing the report and speaking to all parties, there are simply facts here we do not know, so I could not make any assumptions about the situation. I hope for all concerned everything works out for all.

Respectfully, Frank D.
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  #13  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:06 PM
rubicon rubicon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DangeloInspections View Post
Thank you for the kind words. I appreciate it.

Just for the record, I do not know the gentleman who posted this thread....I did not do this inspection. We are usually so busy doing warranty inspections that it is often very difficult for us to fit in "new buyer" type inspections. We do our best, but the feverish pace of The Villages growth usually does not leave us time to do specific problem inspections.

Just a few random thoughts....

Usually a home inspection carefully checks the roof for obvious leaks, signs of damage or improper installation, wear, etc. As the inspection is typically not invasive, we do not remove shingles to check nailing patterns, etc. There ARE many issues we sometimes find on a roof, and when found are documented with pictures and video if needed.

It has been my experience that in Florida, roofs will rarely last more than 15-20 years. The new homeowner stated that the home was 12 years old, so I would assume this was the original roof. I have seen 12 year old roofs look pretty good, and after checking for them to be sealed down, etc. MAY last another few years. No matter what, I would tell the client that it may be wise to budget for a new roof within the next 5 years or so. A 12 year old roof will have some degree of granular loss, brittleness, etc.

Then we have a category one hurricane come over our homes....an unprecedented event. NEW homes with NEW roofs, even if correctly installed, in some cases had damage. How a 12 year old roof fared could vary.....my experience has been that many older roofs had no damage, but some of course did....even new roofs.

The term, "insurable roof" is something I have never heard. An Inspector documents the roof age and condition. In all my years experience I have not ever heard of an Inspector deeming a roof insurable or not, as different insurance companies have different standards. I know a few years ago State Farm would not insure ANY roof older than 5 years old. So...to them this roof , (at least a few years ago) would not be insurable. To many other Insurance companies it probably would have. An inspector would have no say or even any knowledge if a specific insurance company would insure a home.....that is up to the insurance company of course, not an inspector.

There is a lot we do not know from this post. Was there installation problems? Was the work sub standard? If so, what were the defects, and were they observable?

Inspectors have an ethical obligation to the potential buyer. They work for the potential buyer...not a Realtor or anyone else. The potential buyer should have had an established working relationship with no one "in between". I know it is not always possible, but I always recommend that the client be at the inspection.

Also, something was mentioned about the inspector returning with tools. He might have been doing a wind mitigation report.....but a good inspector would never be doing repairs or fixing anything. That if done would be unethical and against our standards.

Anyway, Again, I do not know anyone involved here. I do not know who the inspector was here and would not want to know. I always try to be helpful here and the thread interested me, so I thought I would try to be helpful and share a few thoughts.

Without seeing the report and speaking to all parties, there are simply facts here we do not know, so I could not make any assumptions about the situation. I hope for all concerned everything works out for all.

Respectfully, Frank D.
Frank, I agree with your assessment but the issue of the condition of the roof has become a legal one because the OP on belief of good faith dealing from the realtor bought the home. An independent examination by a neutral ( a third roof inspector) will be highly unlikely volunteered by the seller/realtor. it is going to take a lawyer,or a small claims action to get them to act. Perhaps I am wrong, actually hope I am wrong and the OP can convince the seller to replace the roof

the inspector for the insurance carrier obviously reported his findings of a potential increase risk hazard citing the roof as likely to create water damage. what hasn't been addressed is if in fact water has already penetrated the home.

The roof needs to be replaced down to roof boards.

The OP has to decide if the cost to pursue v simply replacing the roof is worth the effort. Again small claims court is a good remedy
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  #14  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:26 PM
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Dear Rubicon,

Sadly, I agree. What may be difficult to nail down now, (no pun intended) is what the condition of the roof was prior to the hurricane. We also do not know what the insurance guy saw that was so obvious....and was it an issue in installation, or a manufacturer's defect, or could it have been seen non invasively.

What we do know is that it was a 12 year old roof in unknown condition prior to the hurricane, and even after the hurricane. The issues were not disclosed.

We also do not know if the inspector even knew about the "insurable roof" provision. Sometimes a Realtor will just call an inspector and schedule the inspection. This is why I always speak to the person who is the client, not the realtor, and discuss their concerns and expectations. As said earlier, only the insurance company can say if they will insure a home or not.

Appears that it boils down to a possible communication and expectation problem. Very unfortunate.

I hesitate to comment on contentious issues, especially when all the facts are not known or disclosed. I hope all works out well for all involved.

Frank
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  #15  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:44 PM
rubicon rubicon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DangeloInspections View Post
Dear Rubicon,

Sadly, I agree. What may be difficult to nail down now, (no pun intended) is what the condition of the roof was prior to the hurricane. We also do not know what the insurance guy saw that was so obvious....and was it an issue in installation, or a manufacturer's defect, or could it have been seen non invasively.

What we do know is that it was a 12 year old roof in unknown condition prior to the hurricane, and even after the hurricane. The issues were not disclosed.

We also do not know if the inspector even knew about the "insurable roof" provision. Sometimes a Realtor will just call an inspector and schedule the inspection. This is why I always speak to the person who is the client, not the realtor, and discuss their concerns and expectations. As said earlier, only the insurance company can say if they will insure a home or not.

Appears that it boils down to a possible communication and expectation problem. Very unfortunate.

I hesitate to comment on contentious issues, especially when all the facts are not known or disclosed. I hope all works out well for all involved.

Frank
Frank:

Again I agree and it the reason I have offered the OP alternatives. However what the OP said was that the offer of purchase was based on the condition of "an insurable roof". I took that to mean that the OP had some concern/question about the roof.

While I am very familiar with differences of opinion by experts (all) it would seem unlikely that the realtor's inspector was not aware of the condition of this roof especially given the carrier's inspector found it uninsurable ie we are not talking one or two shingles but the entire roof

State Farm will not insure you for sink hole unless an inspection of the insured premises is made and it appears this carrir would not accept the risk (home) unless the roof was replaced

Many insurance companies demand photo of cars, homes ,etc before they will insure. as to cars its not only if they are already damaged but if in fact they even exist

I cannot know what is true or untrue here but if true then I hope the OP prevails.

Personal Best Regards:
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  #16  
Old 10-12-2017, 04:50 PM
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I think Frank is extremely knowledgeable and always willing to offer an intelligent opinion on matters concerning construction, existing potential problems, and home inspections. In this case, I think he is more than elated to have a very busy schedule prohibiting him from getting into the middle of this mess.
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