Mounting shades into exrerior Lanai header beams, New home Fenney

Mounting shades into exrerior Lanai header beams, New home Fenney

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Mounting shades into exrerior Lanai header beams, New home Fenney
  #1  
Old 04-28-2019, 07:15 PM
mhonard mhonard is offline
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Default Mounting shades into exrerior Lanai header beams, New home Fenney

It seems the header support beams in the lanai of newer concrete homes is concrete surrounded by some sort of mesh metal. I've had terrible success drilling through the mesh metal. Once I break through the metal the concrete is no problem. I've been given all kinds of advice ranging from hammer drilling, going fast, going really slow and of course all the different metal choices (cobalt, titanium etc). I'm sure somebody who does this for a living doesn't use 6 bits to get through this mesh. Can anybody give any solid advice? Need a 1/4' hole.

  #2  
Old 04-29-2019, 05:17 AM
photo1902 photo1902 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhonard View Post
It seems the header support beams in the lanai of newer concrete homes is concrete surrounded by some sort of mesh metal. I've had terrible success drilling through the mesh metal. Once I break through the metal the concrete is no problem. I've been given all kinds of advice ranging from hammer drilling, going fast, going really slow and of course all the different metal choices (cobalt, titanium etc). I'm sure somebody who does this for a living doesn't use 6 bits to get through this mesh. Can anybody give any solid advice? Need a 1/4' hole.
I've done this many times, and used a hammer drill with a masonry bit.
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Old 04-29-2019, 05:36 AM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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Try using a smaller bit and then increase to a larger one.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:09 AM
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skip0358 skip0358 is offline
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Hammer Drill & Masonry bit worked for me also.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:26 PM
mhonard mhonard is offline
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Yes, all these ideas work to a degree but it still takes 1/2 hour to drill a 1/4" hole including a lot of backbreaking force. I was told by an installer today that the carbide drill bits dull quickly if you go to fast and/or once you hit the masonry. That might explain why I have varied success. He suggested using self-tapping screws to drill through the metal and then follow up with masonry bit to complete the hole. Throw away the self-tapping screws and use a new one on each hole. I'm going to give this a try. Also, I failed to mention I am drilling very close to the beam edge so the metal mech may be of higher density.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:58 PM
photo1902 photo1902 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhonard View Post
Yes, all these ideas work to a degree but it still takes 1/2 hour to drill a 1/4" hole including a lot of backbreaking force. I was told by an installer today that the carbide drill bits dull quickly if you go to fast and/or once you hit the masonry. That might explain why I have varied success. He suggested using self-tapping screws to drill through the metal and then follow up with masonry bit to complete the hole. Throw away the self-tapping screws and use a new one on each hole. I'm going to give this a try. Also, I failed to mention I am drilling very close to the beam edge so the metal mech may be of higher density.
As someone who does this frequently, you need to make sure you’re using a masonry bit and a hammer drill. Just because a drill bit is “carbide” doesn’t mean it’s a masonry bit. Also, a regular drill (even one equipped with a masonry bit) won’t always do the trick. Not to belabor the point, but I think if you tried a hammer drill and a true masonry bit, you’d see it’s not that difficult.
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Old 04-30-2019, 08:34 AM
yobeano yobeano is offline
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Maybe I'm missing something but if you are trying to get through some kind of metal before you hit the concrete then you can't use a masonry bit first. I had this same issue but my beam was square metal box incased and filled with concrete so I used a regular carbide tip bit at low speed to get me through the metal then the masonry bit to finish the hole. I used tap-cons to mount my shades and complete the job.
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  #8  
Old 04-30-2019, 09:48 AM
mhonard mhonard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by photo1902 View Post
As someone who does this frequently, you need to make sure you’re using a masonry bit and a hammer drill. Just because a drill bit is “carbide” doesn’t mean it’s a masonry bit. Also, a regular drill (even one equipped with a masonry bit) won’t always do the trick. Not to belabor the point, but I think if you tried a hammer drill and a true masonry bit, you’d see it’s not that difficult.
I’m using carbide bit for metal drilling and masonry bit for the masonry. I’m not sure how a masonry bit can cut through metal and the ones I have certainly don’t.
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:15 AM
mhonard mhonard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yobeano View Post
Maybe I'm missing something but if you are trying to get through some kind of metal before you hit the concrete then you can't use a masonry bit first. I had this same issue but my beam was square metal box encased and filled with concrete so I used a regular carbide tip bit at low speed to get me through the metal than the masonry bit to finish the hole. I used tap-cons to mount my shades and complete the job.
Agreed and understand. It's the getting through the metal that is the difficulty I am having. I am using new carbide bits, slow speed and creeping up to the size I need (1/4"). Takes 4-5 bits and a lot of pressure.
Hammer Drill
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:37 AM
sparky4840 sparky4840 is offline
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Default Hammer Drill

If you are using a hammer drill that makes a lot of noise and goes nowhere, rent a real percussion hammer drill. The bit will go through the metal and concrete with ease.
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metal, concrete, mesh, drilling, advice

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