toilet water supply hose replacement

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  #1  
Old 12-14-2014, 07:50 PM
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blueash blueash is offline
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Default toilet water supply hose replacement

Just another Sunday project. Toilet was running so I easily replaced the flush mechanism, reattached the supply hose to the underside of the tank and all seemed fine

But..
A slow slow drip now began coming from the crimping at the bottom end of the supply hose where it attaches to the wall shut off. Now this is not the usual hose with an easily removable nut. There doesn't seem to be any nut rather it is crimped onto the valve. I tried turning it to see if it were threaded, but no change or evidence of threading. I am reluctant to pull as it might pull the valve thru the wall. It is definitely leaking from this lower crimping not traveling down from the tank above.

What is the next step?
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  #2  
Old 12-14-2014, 08:51 PM
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I have seen previous threads about these valves, none good. I think you are looking at replacing the valve with a more conventional unit, sorry for the bad news.

Please do a search on the valves to get some more info, and then if you are not comfortable with cutting and gluing in a new valve, contact a plumber.

I have these in my house and am not looking forward to the future replacement.
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  #3  
Old 12-14-2014, 10:16 PM
wisbad1 wisbad1 is offline
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go to youtube, look up accor tech flow tight vavle. it will give you info on how to change it, ps, turn off water supply!
  #4  
Old 12-14-2014, 10:33 PM
wisbad1 wisbad1 is offline
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How to remove Accor Technology FlowTite water valve. On Youtube. This will help you
  #5  
Old 12-14-2014, 11:37 PM
LndLocked LndLocked is offline
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These modular valve / supply lines are truly awful for the homeowner and are an almost guaranteed leak / replacement problem. They are used because they are cheap and VERY fast for the original installation plumber.

Typically they will fail in one of two ways:

- develop a leak at either crimped supply line connection (where the line is crimped to the valve or where it is crimped to the nut)

- the valve will weaken over time and will not stay in the open position.

In either case, repair is impossible and replacement is your only solution.

They will twist off by turning and pulling the valve counter clockwise. I always just cut the supply line off to get it out of the way. This video shows the procedure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNTfM_vku5k

You can also cut them off, just behind the valve body. HOWEVER, make sure you have enough pipe stubbed through the wall to attache / glue a replacement valve.

You can then get your standard 1/4 turn shut off valve and supply line (for toilet) at Ace, Lowes, HD and replace this modular POS. However, make sure that the new valve is made to glue to CPVC. This is the tan looking plastic water pipe that is used in TV homes and not your garden variety PVC. CPVC also requires glue formulated for CPVC ... AND be sure you let it cure for a minimum of 30 mins before you turn the water back on to the house. CPVC glue DOES NOT bond instantaneously like PVC glue does.

I will PM my contact info if you want to discuss further.
  #6  
Old 12-15-2014, 12:58 AM
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Thanks to all. Yes, another great design feature. Interestingly the manufacturer has a 10 year warranty including labor. I have emailed and will see whether they really mean it. Fortunately the other toilet is still in good order.
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  #7  
Old 02-01-2015, 11:10 PM
HimandMe HimandMe is offline
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These cheap things are usually only put in mobile homes according to the guy at Ace Hardware.
  #8  
Old 02-02-2015, 06:34 AM
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philnpat philnpat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LndLocked View Post
These modular valve / supply lines are truly awful for the homeowner and are an almost guaranteed leak / replacement problem. They are used because they are cheap and VERY fast for the original installation plumber.

Typically they will fail in one of two ways:

- develop a leak at either crimped supply line connection (where the line is crimped to the valve or where it is crimped to the nut)

- the valve will weaken over time and will not stay in the open position.

In either case, repair is impossible and replacement is your only solution.

They will twist off by turning and pulling the valve counter clockwise. I always just cut the supply line off to get it out of the way. This video shows the procedure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNTfM_vku5k

You can also cut them off, just behind the valve body. HOWEVER, make sure you have enough pipe stubbed through the wall to attache / glue a replacement valve.

You can then get your standard 1/4 turn shut off valve and supply line (for toilet) at Ace, Lowes, HD and replace this modular POS. However, make sure that the new valve is made to glue to CPVC. This is the tan looking plastic water pipe that is used in TV homes and not your garden variety PVC. CPVC also requires glue formulated for CPVC ... AND be sure you let it cure for a minimum of 30 mins before you turn the water back on to the house. CPVC glue DOES NOT bond instantaneously like PVC glue does.

I will PM my contact info if you want to discuss further.

That is very complete and a well written post.
Thanks for taking the time for your instructions.
  #9  
Old 02-02-2015, 09:02 AM
shcisamax shcisamax is offline
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This is a little of topic but since everyone is so knowledgeable, I thought I would ask. The water in one of the toilets is very low in the bowl. Any ideas why? And how to get it higher?
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