Who is the best financial advisor in The Villages?

Who is the best financial advisor in The Villages?

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  #21  
Old 07-29-2015, 06:05 AM
DRandazzo DRandazzo is offline
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Give Parady a chance. They have your goals first.
Good Luck

  #22  
Old 07-29-2015, 06:26 AM
Villageswimmer Villageswimmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRandazzo View Post
Give Parady a chance. They have your goals first.
Good Luck

Could you please elaborate?
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  #23  
Old 07-29-2015, 08:48 AM
784caroline 784caroline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxman View Post
It takes very little effort to do it yourself. I think the only reason people use a financial advisor is to calm their fears and keep them from bailing in a bear market. I find the cost of this hand holding to be extreme. I've learned through mistakes over the years not to use an advisor.

We have free resources now that we did not have 10-20 years ago. Those resources make it very easy to put your investments on auto pilot.
MAXMAN...For someone comfortable and has experience or wanting to learn, I cannot disagree....doing It yourself may be best from a monetary perspective.. But even the best of the experienced (non-professional) person can get spooked in rough markets for most lack discipline, patience, and foresight. In the community we live, you or I may be very comfortable in making investment decisions for the family BUT what will happen when (Note not "IF" but "WHEN") the experienced person who handled all the investment is no longer with us or unable to make these decisions and now your spouse or other family member(s) are left with a pile of receipts and records of investments.

If we are now talking about the need for a Financial advisor, we must have done something right during our adult life. I believe it is crucial that we develop a relationship with a financial advisor who is more than simply a number you call and place orders or you stop by their office to make investment decisions. This relationship should include your spouse or other family members who they can get comfortable with and when the time does come , they can call and ask for help in guiding them. Over my career, I have or had accounts with many types of firms including Fidelity, T Rowe Price, some major brokerage houses etc. and although they offered advice and assistance on my holdings, the relationship, as I speak about, was just never developed.

Will you make a million bucks with these advisors that are discussed on TOTV, probably not but most likely your money will grow. It may take 6-12 months for them to really know your comfort level, and how aggressive or conservative you are, but you and your spouse will be meeting with them twice a year where your needs, goals, and desires are discussed. From the 3 big advisors discussed here (Fross, Baum, and Paraday) each brings something different to the table, deal with different type of clients, and what may be good for you, may not be for me, but in the big picture, its the relationship that matters most.

Here's to Good Investing!!
Protect your retirement, heard good things about TB Financial
  #24  
Old 07-29-2015, 08:50 AM
PRpro PRpro is offline
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Default Protect your retirement, heard good things about TB Financial

I have heard nothing but great things about TB Financial Group just outside of The Villages in Fruitland Park. Liz Cornell is the financial retirement strategist you would be working with, and TB holds free educational seminars called Annuity University 101, which help you to understand the "tough" questions you may have that most investors won't talk about... I know that they advertise their seminars in the Daily Sun. My friends say they are very informative and knowledgeable and host awesome client socials as a bonus.
  #25  
Old 07-29-2015, 11:29 AM
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l2ridehd l2ridehd is offline
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Most if not all financial advisors do not have your best interest in mind. They have theirs. They will sell you products that pay them the highest commissions. No one will take care of your money like you will and it is really easy.

1. Determine the best asset allocation for you at your point in life based on your risk tolerance. There are many online tools that will help you do this. Age in bonds is a bit to simplistic for most people but not a bad place to start. I use 60% stocks and 40% bonds, but that is much higher risk then most retired folks should have. Try 50/50 or 40/60.
2. Buy a total stock market fund, a total international fund and a total bond fund from a very low expense mutual fund company. Vanguard, Fidelity or Schwab all have them. Buy them in a ratio of your desired asset allocation.
3. Re-balance once a year on your birthday.

Very simple, very low cost, and will beat the returns of all financial advisors. There are 100's of articles that will tell you that over any 10 year period in the history of the market that this approach will beat all actively managed portfolios and have lower downside risk. The only way you can achieve higher returns is to take higher risks and that will always have a down side.

I will be more than happy to help anyone set this type portfolio up for free. Have you do everything yourself so you know how to do it. I have managed mine like this for years. I do use some slight variations on this that add small cap and value funds, plus some international bonds, but I do not recommend that for others. Keep it simple with just 3 funds. Keep the bonds in tax deferred and the stocks in taxable if possible.
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Last edited by l2ridehd; 07-29-2015 at 12:29 PM.
  #26  
Old 07-29-2015, 12:20 PM
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manaboutown manaboutown is online now
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But where are the customers' yachts (or polo ponies)?

Once again I totally agree with l2ridehd.
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  #27  
Old 07-29-2015, 02:12 PM
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pbkmaine pbkmaine is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l2ridehd View Post
Most if not all financial advisors do not have your best interest in mind. They have theirs. They will sell you products that pay them the highest commissions. No one will take care of your money like you will and it is really easy.

1. Determine the best asset allocation for you at your point in life based on your risk tolerance. There are many online tools that will help you do this. Age in bonds is a bit to simplistic for most people but not a bad place to start. I use 60% stocks and 40% bonds, but that is much higher risk then most retired folks should have. Try 50/50 or 40/60.
2. Buy a total stock market fund, a total international fund and a total bond fund from a very low expense mutual fund company. Vanguard, Fidelity or Schwab all have them. Buy them in a ratio of your desired asset allocation.
3. Re-balance once a year on your birthday.

Very simple, very low cost, and will beat the returns of all financial advisors. There are 100's of articles that will tell you that over any 10 year period in the history of the market that this approach will beat all actively managed portfolios and have lower downside risk. The only way you can achieve higher returns is to take higher risks and that will always have a down side.

I will be more than happy to help anyone set this type portfolio up for free. Have you do everything yourself so you know how to do it. I have managed mine like this for years. I do use some slight variations on this that add small cap and value funds, plus some international bonds, but I do not recommend that for others. Keep it simple with just 3 funds. Keep the bonds in tax deferred and the stocks in taxable if possible.

Agree on all points.
  #28  
Old 07-29-2015, 02:59 PM
Villageswimmer Villageswimmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l2ridehd View Post
Most if not all financial advisors do not have your best interest in mind. They have theirs. They will sell you products that pay them the highest commissions. No one will take care of your money like you will and it is really easy.

1. Determine the best asset allocation for you at your point in life based on your risk tolerance. There are many online tools that will help you do this. Age in bonds is a bit to simplistic for most people but not a bad place to start. I use 60% stocks and 40% bonds, but that is much higher risk then most retired folks should have. Try 50/50 or 40/60.
2. Buy a total stock market fund, a total international fund and a total bond fund from a very low expense mutual fund company. Vanguard, Fidelity or Schwab all have them. Buy them in a ratio of your desired asset allocation.
3. Re-balance once a year on your birthday.



Very simple, very low cost, and will beat the returns of all financial advisors. There are 100's of articles that will tell you that over any 10 year period in the history of the market that this approach will beat all actively managed portfolios and have lower downside risk. The only way you can achieve higher returns is to take higher risks and that will always have a down side.

I will be more than happy to help anyone set this type portfolio up for free. Have you do everything yourself so you know how to do it. I have managed mine like this for years. I do use some slight variations on this that add small cap and value funds, plus some international bonds, but I do not recommend that for others. Keep it simple with just 3 funds. Keep the bonds in tax deferred and the stocks in taxable if possible.
Agree...I think we need a Bogleheads club in TV. It would be fun to share these simple principles and save folks $ in fees. I consider it a hobby and there's always more to learn.
  #29  
Old 07-29-2015, 03:40 PM
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Maxman Maxman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 784caroline View Post
MAXMAN...For someone comfortable and has experience or wanting to learn, I cannot disagree....doing It yourself may be best from a monetary perspective.. But even the best of the experienced (non-professional) person can get spooked in rough markets for most lack discipline, patience, and foresight. In the community we live, you or I may be very comfortable in making investment decisions for the family BUT what will happen when (Note not "IF" but "WHEN") the experienced person who handled all the investment is no longer with us or unable to make these decisions and now your spouse or other family member(s) are left with a pile of receipts and records of investments.

If we are now talking about the need for a Financial advisor, we must have done something right during our adult life. I believe it is crucial that we develop a relationship with a financial advisor who is more than simply a number you call and place orders or you stop by their office to make investment decisions. This relationship should include your spouse or other family members who they can get comfortable with and when the time does come , they can call and ask for help in guiding them. Over my career, I have or had accounts with many types of firms including Fidelity, T Rowe Price, some major brokerage houses etc. and although they offered advice and assistance on my holdings, the relationship, as I speak about, was just never developed.

Will you make a million bucks with these advisors that are discussed on TOTV, probably not but most likely your money will grow. It may take 6-12 months for them to really know your comfort level, and how aggressive or conservative you are, but you and your spouse will be meeting with them twice a year where your needs, goals, and desires are discussed. From the 3 big advisors discussed here (Fross, Baum, and Paraday) each brings something different to the table, deal with different type of clients, and what may be good for you, may not be for me, but in the big picture, its the relationship that matters most.

Here's to Good Investing!!
My spouse has no interest in or knowledge in investing. I have left her instructions to call Vanguard and go with their advisory account in the event of my death or becoming incapacitated. They currently charge .03% for that service
which is quite fair.

As for Fross, Baum, and Paraday stay well clear of them, as their super high advisory costs will take most if not all of your potential gains.

Just think about an annuity. You give an insurance company your money and tie it up for ten years. If you want it back before then they charge you a penalty on your money. Any rube can sell you an annuity. And I mean sell you!

As said before this is not rocket science. Take l2ridehd's advice.
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  #30  
Old 07-29-2015, 03:55 PM
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l2ridehd l2ridehd is offline
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Part of the reason for keeping it so very simple and using just a 3 fund portfolio is so your spouse or someone with very limited experience and interest can continue to manage it.

I keep a book called for lack of a better name "my death book" and in there is all the information my wife will need when I go somewhere else. And a couple of pages are about how to manage our investments. I even include what to do if the market drops 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50%. When and how to re-balance. When to get more conservative. And why to manage it this way. What to do if she feels she can't manage it. How to un-freeze the credit reports, living will, when to turn off the machines, what to sell and what to keep. Even have anticipated values for land and other owned assets.

I have even written my own obituary and provided the deeds to our burial plot. Even who to officiate, who to hold the funeral, and have even purchased and installed the headstone.
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