Anybody using gypsum on lawn

Anybody using gypsum on lawn

Notices

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Anybody using gypsum on lawn
  #1  
Old 12-18-2018, 08:34 PM
thetruth thetruth is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 414
Default Anybody using gypsum on lawn

I've read it will improve soil structure in clay soil; which is what we have. I've read unlike lime it will not change the PH, our soil is mostly around ph of 7 or even higher-alkaline.

Looking for instructions perhaps experience.

Internet instructions say seem to be all over the place. I've read you can spread it on top as you would granular fertilizers. I've read 50 lbs per 1000 sq ft of lawn. I've also read 50 lbs per 2,500 sq ft of lawn. Both say apply twice a year.

HUH,
Reply With Quote

  #2  
Old 12-18-2018, 09:43 PM
villagetinker's Avatar
villagetinker villagetinker is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Village of Pinellas
Posts: 4,952
Default

Contact either Master Gardner or University of Florida for an answer on this one, I have never heard of this. Make sure you let them know what type of grass you have, and I would have a soil test done also. You do not want to have to replace all of your sod.
__________________
Pennsylvania, for 60+ years, most recently, Allentown, now TV.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #3  
Old 12-23-2018, 04:17 PM
crash crash is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 144
Default

Gypsum is used on clay soils and it will increase the ph. All the soil I have seen around here is sand. Definitely get it tested and talk to a master gardener.
Reply With Quote
According to my reading
  #4  
Old 12-24-2018, 09:45 AM
thetruth thetruth is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 414
Default According to my reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by crash View Post
Gypsum is used on clay soils and it will increase the ph. All the soil I have seen around here is sand. Definitely get it tested and talk to a master gardener.
RE: increasing ph-making our already alkaline soil more alkaline
You may be confusing Lime with Gypsum. Gypsum is supposed to as lime does, improve the structure of clay soil but gypsum does not change the ph as it has sulfur in it. so it is claimed not to effect ph either up or down
As lime does, gypsum does add calcium to the soil. There is supposed to be a ratio of calcium to magnesium.

What I find interesting is that gypsum has been used for centuries.Ben Franklin mentioned using it and yet all the information I've been able to find, including those that suggest using it do not supply clear instructions as to how much and how often.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:25 AM
Ozzello Ozzello is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 277
Default

Agreed. pH average here is 7.2. If you want a better lawn , add coffee like it is fertilizer. In addition to the tannic and other organic acids to help your grass pick up micro nutrients, it is a weak fertilizer of macro and micro nutrients as well.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:29 AM
Ozzello Ozzello is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 277
Default

You don't have Florida soil in TV . You have fill from a pit with sod on top. Even the FDOT requires 6 inches of soil when laying sod. If you actually had 6 inches of soil, your pH would be better and you would possibly benefit from adding gypsum or other lime products.
Reply With Quote
Report re: Gypsum
  #7  
Old 02-07-2019, 05:14 PM
thetruth thetruth is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 414
Default Report re: Gypsum

Quote:
Originally Posted by thetruth View Post
I've read it will improve soil structure in clay soil; which is what we have. I've read unlike lime it will not change the PH, our soil is mostly around ph of 7 or even higher-alkaline.

Looking for instructions perhaps experience.

Internet instructions say seem to be all over the place. I've read you can spread it on top as you would granular fertilizers. I've read 50 lbs per 1000 sq ft of lawn. I've also read 50 lbs per 2,500 sq ft of lawn. Both say apply twice a year.

HUH,
As in my original post. I had read about using gypsum to improve the structure of clay soils. Instructions are all over the place as to how much, how often etc. IT DOES NOT AS SOMEONE STATED CHANGE THE SOIL PH as it is Calcium SULFATE.

So I applied 80 lbs to my 5,000 sq foot lawn in November and now in Feb just had a soil test done. Not at all scientific as I did not test before and after application. I do have a bucket of soil pre the application of the gypsum in a bucket removed when I planted ?????? I've also injected about 4,000 pounds of manure into my 5,000 sq foot lawn so as stated what caused what I do not really know. The manure was done about 2-3 years ago.

Now my soil in texture is much like potting soil. Surely, the application of the gypsum has improved drainage and my soil when I removed the samples for test, while perhaps too wet to dig in did not form the clods we had before due to our clay.

I then had a full soil test done by the cooperative extension.
According to their form the suggest a PH of 6.5 for our Zoyzia.
I have 7.1. The advisor a cooperative extension, told me, and I thought I knew it anyway that applying sulfur is not suggested as any result is very temporary. My calcium soil level is high.
The person I spoke to told me that could be normal. I suspect the gypsum increased that.

MY VIEW-You can wish you had better soil. In the real world you have what you have. Like a house on a poor foundation, the first thing to do is to improve your soil. My goal is to have a reasonable lawn with the least amount of work expense and negative environmental impact.

Trying to avoid the my lawn is greener than your lawn-INSANITY
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-13-2019, 08:39 AM
Ozzello Ozzello is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 277
Default

I have done thousands of soil tests in TV and all over the state of FL. 7.1 is the result almost every test in TV. What you have is also calcium based for the most part and needs no gypsum. Again, I am certified in soil testing by the State of Florida, and privy to what the State requires for soil prior to laying sod on State projects. Among several other horticulture and agriculture qualifications and certifications. I am not here to talk about me, but to help you all have better lawns and landscapes, soooo

Not sure who told you sulfur is short term, but it actually is very long term based and takes many months to show affect and requires many years of application to get the needed change to your pH that will give you thriving lawns. Check out a rural efficiency guide or a college book, and forget hearsay or what self proclaimed experts in a gardening social club have to say with no proof or data to show.

The cheapest, most readily available, fastest acting choice is still.....coffee. Used grounds, fresh grounds, liquid. Your lawns, palms and most of your plants ( if planted healthy and properly), are still desiring the micro nutrients they can not utilize in the soil you have.

I have 1000s customers over the last 3 decades to show as examples of those that do / those that don't, and the scientific data to prove what I continue to require as proper maintenance for healthy flora at each and every landscape I design and install. Good luck!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
read, lawn, lbs, instructions, soil
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:06 PM.