Glaucoma that strikes overnight

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  #1  
Old 02-16-2011, 04:20 AM
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Unhappy Glaucoma that strikes overnight

Has anyone ever heard that far sighted people have a risk for a different kind of glaucoma that can strike suddenly? I went to the eye doctor today and he said that the way far sighted peoples eyes are built the kind of glaucoma they can get can be sudden as the iris can be pushed up to block the fluid drain and the fluid will then build up fast. He wants to laser a hole in my iris to allow fluid to reach the drain as a preventive measure as my iris is already pushed forward despite my having normal eye pressure. Has anyone had this done. It sounds a little scary. The doc says it is a simple procedure and no big deal.
  #2  
Old 02-16-2011, 08:25 AM
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Trudy, I would definitely get a second opinion.

I have wondered too, who people here have confidence in who are ophthalmologists( rather that optometrists or oculists.)

As I age, I feel better seeing an M.D. when it is time to have my glasses changed, just because of changes that could be occurring that I am not aware of.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrudyM View Post
Has anyone ever heard that far sighted people have a risk for a different kind of glaucoma that can strike suddenly? I went to the eye doctor today and he said that the way far sighted people’s eyes are built the kind of glaucoma they can get can be sudden as the iris can be pushed up to block the fluid drain and the fluid will then build up fast. He wants to laser a hole in my iris to allow fluid to reach the drain as a preventive measure as my iris is already pushed forward despite my having normal eye pressure. Has anyone had this done. It sounds a little scary. The doc says it is a simple procedure and no big deal.
Trudy - What you are describing is called angle closure glaucoma, or acute glaucoma. It is related to the structure of the eye and is more common in farsighted people. Remember that we are talking farsighted, not presbyopic. Presbyopia is the condition we reach in our 40's and 50's where we have to go to bifocals or reading glasses. Farsighted is different and, like nearsightedness, may be present all your life.

A farsighted eye is typically shorter in length than a normal or nearsighted eye, so the internal structures are closer together. In some farsighted eyes, the structures near the drainage channels for internal fluid can block the drainage, so the pressure rises quickly and suddenly resulting in damage to the optic nerve and vision loss. Why it may happen overnight is because, at night or in the dark, your pupil opens up like a folding door and gathers near the drainage channel, increasing the chance of blocking some or all of it. What your surgeon wants to do is use a laser to open a small pathway to allow fluid to drain from the back of the iris to the front. It is a secondary way for the fluid to drain, reducing dramatically the risk of angle closure and damage to vision. The procedure is quick and painless.

Gracie - A competent optometrist will evaluate your eyes for internal and external disease such as the above during a routine exam. And they are trained and licensed to treat many eye diseases short of surgery. I know in years gone by there was emphasis mostly in glasses, but that has changed dramatically in the last 20-25 years. Certainly go to an MD if your are more comfortable there, but don't rule out an OD. How do I know? That was my profession for over 30 years. The last 26 years of practice was in a medical group where optometrists saw all eye patients, referring to the ophthalmology department only those who required surgical intervention or treatments outside of our licensing, such as intraocular injections or laser treatment.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:23 AM
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While MikeOD makes some very good points, I would also like a 2nd opinion before I let someone poke a hole in my eye.
"No big deal", my tooshie!
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  #5  
Old 02-16-2011, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeod View Post
Trudy - What you are describing is called angle closure glaucoma, or acute glaucoma. It is related to the structure of the eye and is more common in farsighted people. Remember that we are talking farsighted, not presbyopic. Presbyopia is the condition we reach in our 40's and 50's where we have to go to bifocals or reading glasses. Farsighted is different and, like nearsightedness, may be present all your life.

A farsighted eye is typically shorter in length than a normal or nearsighted eye, so the internal structures are closer together. In some farsighted eyes, the structures near the drainage channels for internal fluid can block the drainage, so the pressure rises quickly and suddenly resulting in damage to the optic nerve and vision loss. Why it may happen overnight is because, at night or in the dark, your pupil opens up like a folding door and gathers near the drainage channel, increasing the chance of blocking some or all of it. What your surgeon wants to do is use a laser to open a small pathway to allow fluid to drain from the back of the iris to the front. It is a secondary way for the fluid to drain, reducing dramatically the risk of angle closure and damage to vision. The procedure is quick and painless.

Gracie - A competent optometrist will evaluate your eyes for internal and external disease such as the above during a routine exam. And they are trained and licensed to treat many eye diseases short of surgery. I know in years gone by there was emphasis mostly in glasses, but that has changed dramatically in the last 20-25 years. Certainly go to an MD if your are more comfortable there, but don't rule out an OD. How do I know? That was my profession for over 30 years. The last 26 years of practice was in a medical group where optometrists saw all eye patients, referring to the ophthalmology department only those who required surgical intervention or treatments outside of our licensing, such as intraocular injections or laser treatment.
Thank you for your excellent information. I am very impressed with your knowledge. I hope that I have not insulted you.
  #6  
Old 02-16-2011, 11:22 AM
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Default Laser hole in the eyes

I had this procedure done about 15 years ago. I had it done because glaucoma is in my family & my pressure (in the eye)was getting high. Since then I have had the optimal eye pressure at every yearly exam & no problems.

Norm
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Old 02-16-2011, 11:47 AM
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Had it done for high pressure in my eye about 2 years ago. One of the MD eye doctors here in the Village did it and so far the pressure has remained down. No pain, and afterward you are back to your normal routine.
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Old 02-16-2011, 02:47 PM
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Default Thanks for the support

Thanks for the info and support. I have always been far sighted so not the old age type, the different shaped eye type.

I should have said my doctor was an eye surgeon but now has his younger associate whom he trained do the actural surgery as he no longer does surgery due to his arthritis. I always go to a MD as I have perception issues conected to my cross lobal dyslexia and need an MD to separate the visual issues that need lens correction from those that are neurological in origin.

Glad to here from those who have had the surgery. He is also going to send me to a optical nerve specialist as my baby stroke in 2008 has left one of the eye mustles not working right. I am not sure if that requires surgery I will go for it as the impact on my vision is not big. But it sounds like this laser hole thing I should have done. I have been surfing the net on it and if not done a person can go blind so I will bite the bullet and schedule. I didn't think I would have to deal with stuff like this at 58, can you tell I have to be dragged to a doctor kicking and complaining.

Thanks again for the support.
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Old 02-16-2011, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrudyM View Post
Thanks for the info and support. I have always been far sighted so not the old age type, the different shaped eye type.

I should have said my doctor was an eye surgeon but now has his younger associate whom he trained do the actural surgery as he no longer does surgery due to his arthritis. I always go to a MD as I have perception issues conected to my cross lobal dyslexia and need an MD to separate the visual issues that need lens correction from those that are neurological in origin.

Glad to here from those who have had the surgery. He is also going to send me to a optical nerve specialist as my baby stroke in 2008 has left one of the eye mustles not working right. I am not sure if that requires surgery I will go for it as the impact on my vision is not big. But it sounds like this laser hole thing I should have done. I have been surfing the net on it and if not done a person can go blind so I will bite the bullet and schedule. I didn't think I would have to deal with stuff like this at 58, can you tell I have to be dragged to a doctor kicking and complaining.

Thanks again for the support.
Trudy - Glad you did some internet research. It should have shown the minimal risk in the procedure. In this case, age is a factor, but structure is really the biggest one. We did this on patients of all ages. It is really insurance against this form of glaucoma. Once done, your chances of having angle closure glaucoma are remote.
  #10  
Old 02-16-2011, 04:42 PM
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Hi Trudy,
Sounds like you have done a good job of doing your homework. If the procedure were safe, I trusted the MD and risked blindness by not having it done, I think I would have the procedure.

A second opinion usually would comfort me if time permitted. However, in this case, if a second doctor said no, and I risked blindness if the second doctor were wrong, I'd need a mighty compelling argument against it to risk NOT having the procedure.

Please, please tell us how it works out. I am hoping for the best possible outcome.
  #11  
Old 02-17-2011, 09:41 AM
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Thanks to everybody on the comments of this thread. I have one farsighted eye, one near sighted. Some of the symptoms described I am currently experiencing.

Eye appt set up for next week. It will give me a better understanding in my ability to describe what is happening. Perhaps you fine folks have saved my vision.

Thanks!
  #12  
Old 02-17-2011, 01:34 PM
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Default Thanks again

Thanks again for all your info and support. I have set the appointments for the surgery first the right and then a week later the left.
Funny how given I have always been far sighted that no one mentioned the potential danger till now, apparently it is a risk all people who are born with this shape of eye face as they age. I have lived in six states and had 8 different eye MDs over the years. Guess they don't like to alarm people and only address when they see the iris movement forward. My fluid pressure has always and still is normal, so I guess that is not a gauge for far sighted people. I wanted to especially thank " mikeod " for his expert and easy to understand explanation.
  #13  
Old 04-01-2011, 01:43 AM
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Default Surgery went fine

I realized I never let you all know how it went. As you were all so helpful I thought I would let you know all is well. It has been 17 days since the second eye was done and there is still some inflamation(usually all gone by now for most people) but the doc says all should be fine with another week of the steriod drops.
Thanks again for all the support.
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