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-   -   Pictures Of Water Fillters From My House In The Villages (https://www.talkofthevillages.com/forums/villages-florida-general-discussion-73/pictures-water-fillters-my-house-villages-140727/)

tag460 01-25-2015 08:12 PM

Pictures Of Water Fillters From My House In The Villages
 
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There have been numerous threads on the water here in The Villages. One question that I seen ask many times, is any type of system is needed, whether it be a water softener or filtration system? I had a three filter system installed with 20 inch filters. It has a 5 micron carbon filter, 10 micron filter and 20 micron filter. I just changed the filters after two years of use and decided to post a picture of filters that remove impurities in the water. (manufacture recommends fifteen months usage) For me money well spent!

HMLRHT1 01-25-2015 10:01 PM

I have found a lot of dirt in my filters as well and they r changed every 3 months. Although it does seem as time goes on that there is less and less. But it is still there.

Rollie 01-26-2015 07:25 AM

Changing the filters on a whole house filter system is a whole lot cheaper that changing the filter on the fridge. We now only change our fridge filter once every two years.

Rollie

Chi-Town 01-26-2015 07:31 AM

The filter information usually tells you how many gallons they are good for. Check your bill for usage.

Bay Kid 01-26-2015 07:39 AM

What is the most reasonable whole house filter, but still good?

tuccillo 01-26-2015 08:04 AM

I assume those are the 2 sediment filters. Did you also change the carbon filter after 2 years or do you change it more frequently?

Quote:

Originally Posted by tag460 (Post 1001134)
There have been numerous threads on the water here in The Villages. One question that I seen ask many times, is any type of system is needed, whether it be a water softener or filtration system? I had a three filter system installed with 20 inch filters. It has a 5 micron carbon filter, 10 micron filter and 20 micron filter. I just changed the filters after two years of use and decided to post a picture of filters that remove impurities in the water. (manufacture recommends fifteen months usage) For me money well spent!


TrudyM 01-26-2015 09:11 AM

Thanks for the post
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tuccillo (Post 1001279)
I assume those are the 2 sediment filters. Did you also change the carbon filter after 2 years or do you change it more frequently?

Ok I am thick why would a system have two sediment filters. Also is the filter that is suppose to take out hard water ions work or do you need a salt system?

tag460 01-26-2015 09:20 AM

tuccillo: The carbon filter was also changed after two years.

tag460 01-26-2015 09:35 AM

Bay Kid: Sent you a PM.

tuccillo 01-26-2015 09:54 AM

It may be more efficient - the first filter will do most of the filtering of larger particles and the second filter will remove smaller particles. In other words, you don't want the second filter clogged up with larger particles that a coarser filter can effectively remove.

I have seen some "water softener filters" - they essentially have ion exchange resin but need to be replaced when exhausted. The more typical situation is an actual water softener that recharges the resin periodically by flushing a salt or potassium brine solution across it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrudyM (Post 1001319)
Ok I am thick why would a system have two sediment filters. Also is the filter that is suppose to take out hard water ions work or do you need a salt system?


villagetinker 01-26-2015 11:21 AM

We installed a Sears water softener and a Sears whole house water filter, parts costs around $800 (they now have a combo unit for less). This provides water that is soft, and so clear that the crystal we was in the dish washer over the last year is as clear as the crystal that has never been used, and we do not use jet dry or any other additives. We use salt to recharge the water softener. NOTE we did notice the hard water as soon as we moved in.

Nova Filtration 01-26-2015 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tag460 (Post 1001134)
There have been numerous threads on the water here in The Villages. One question that I seen ask many times, is any type of system is needed, whether it be a water softener or filtration system? I had a three filter system installed with 20 inch filters. It has a 5 micron carbon filter, 10 micron filter and 20 micron filter. I just changed the filters after two years of use and decided to post a picture of filters that remove impurities in the water. (manufacture recommends fifteen months usage) For me money well spent!

Tag, as you know you waited a bit too long 12-15 months is time frame recommended do to growth of bacteria starting at 15 months.
Base on how much dirt was on those filters they did a good job

Quote:

Originally Posted by HMLRHT1 (Post 1001183)
I have found a lot of dirt in my filters as well and they r changed every 3 months. Although it does seem as time goes on that there is less and less. But it is still there.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rollie (Post 1001260)
Changing the filters on a whole house filter system is a whole lot cheaper that changing the filter on the fridge. We now only change our fridge filter once every two years.
Rollie

Rollie that's too long for a big filter, a tiny fridge filters isn't really working after 6 months to any degree of safety

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chi-Town (Post 1001263)
The filter information usually tells you how many gallons they are good for. Check your bill for usage.

Our filters use gauges, you can not rely on gallon throughput

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrudyM (Post 1001319)
Ok I am thick why would a system have two sediment filters. Also is the filter that is suppose to take out hard water ions work or do you need a salt system?

We build them with two so the 5 micron stays clean of larger particles, it's simply the better way to do it, 20-10-5

Quote:

Originally Posted by villagetinker (Post 1001438)
We installed a Sears water softener and a Sears whole house water filter, parts costs around $800 This provides water that is soft, and so clear that the crystal we was in the dish washer over the last year is as clear as the crystal that has never been used, and we do not use jet dry or any other additives. We use salt to recharge the water softener. NOTE we did notice the hard water as soon as we moved in.

We don't believe in softeners, I think what you may have noticed was not the hard water, it isn't that hard here, it the other things ans chemicals.

I have installed over 200 of the triple systems, I can sell softeners and infact can make more money, but I don't believe in them so in good conscience try and talk folks out of them. :shrug:

They add salt to the water not good for blood pressure, also as I previously posted here they increase the risk of kidney stones.

I have removed 4 of them in place of the Nova Triple still only $495 installed

When you install a water softener all you get is the same dirty contaminated water just a little softer.

I have been working with water filtration over 40 years, this is what I think is right system for this area that I myself live in.

Believe what you will about other systems.


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tuccillo 01-27-2015 12:53 AM

The water in The Villages is considered "hard" to "very hard" at about 12 grains per gallon. A water softener will reduce the hardness to essentially zero. While there is no evidence to suggest that the hardness will cause any medical issues, many people like the multiple advantages of soft water. If you don't want the small increase in sodium in the softened water you can use potassium chloride instead of sodium chloride for the resin regeneration process. Filtering to remove dirt and chlorine (pretty high in The Villages) is also a good idea in addition to a water softener. The removal of chlorine before the water softener will also extend the life of the resin used for ion exchange in the water softener.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nova Filtration (Post 1001789)
Tag, as you know you waited a bit too long 12-15 months is time frame recommended do to growth of bacteria starting at 15 months.
Base on how much dirt was on those filters they did a good job





Rollie that's too long for a big filter, a tiny fridge filters isn't really working after 6 months to any degree of safety



Our filters use gauges, you can not rely on gallon throughput



We build them with two so the 5 micron stays clean of larger particles, it's simply the better way to do it, 20-10-5



We don't believe in softeners, I think what you may have noticed was not the hard water, it isn't that hard here, it the other things ans chemicals.

I have installed over 200 of the triple systems, I can sell softeners and infact can make more money, but I don't believe in them so in good conscience try and talk folks out of them. :shrug:

They add salt to the water not good for blood pressure, also as I previously posted here they increase the risk of kidney stones.

I have removed 4 of them in place of the Nova Triple still only $495 installed

When you install a water softener all you get is the same dirty contaminated water just a little softer.

I have been working with water filtration over 40 years, this is what I think is right system for this area that I myself live in.

Believe what you will about other systems.


.

.


villagetinker 01-27-2015 09:21 AM

Some additional information, I have tested our water after the installation of the Sears units, and NO salt, No chorine, or sediment, and the water tastes so good, my wife has given up on here bottled water ($$$). There are many opinions in this area, and these are our actual observations.
To all, do your homework, and get a system that has a proven track record to do what you want.

jimbo2012 01-27-2015 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tuccillo (Post 1001806)
The water in The Villages is considered "hard" to "very hard" at about 12 grains per gallon. A water softener will reduce the hardness to essentially zero. While there is no evidence to suggest that the hardness will cause any medical issues

That is factually incorrect, two reasons the water here has a hardness of about 10 not 12, but that's neither here nor there.

Fact water softeners DO NOT reduce hardness to zero, they bring to about 7, which is considered neutral.

heath issues
hard water has many health benefits when compared to soft water.
Two of the most prevalent minerals in hard water are calcium and magnesium. Both calcium and magnesium are considered essential nutrients, meaning that they must be provided in the diet in order to maintain healthy body function. Calcium is a critical component of bones, and has many positive effects on the body, such as prevention of serious life-threatening and painful ailments like osteoporosis, kidney stones, hypertension, stroke, obesity, and coronary artery disease. Magnesium also has positive health effects. Inadequate amounts of magnesium in the body increase the risks for some forms of health problems, such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, and diabetes mellitus.

Studies done on the health effects of hard and soft water have shown that people who drink greater amounts of soft water have much higher incidences of heart disease, as well as higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and faster heart rates than those who drink mostly hard water.

from UC Davis


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:beer3:


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