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-   -   Mounting shades into exrerior Lanai header beams, New home Fenney (https://www.talkofthevillages.com/forums/do-yourself-210/mounting-shades-into-exrerior-lanai-header-beams-new-home-fenney-290620/)

mhonard 04-28-2019 07:15 PM

Mounting shades into exrerior Lanai header beams, New home Fenney
 
It seems the header support beams in the lanai of newer concrete homes is concrete surrounded by some sort of mesh metal. I've had terrible success drilling through the mesh metal. Once I break through the metal the concrete is no problem. I've been given all kinds of advice ranging from hammer drilling, going fast, going really slow and of course all the different metal choices (cobalt, titanium etc). I'm sure somebody who does this for a living doesn't use 6 bits to get through this mesh. Can anybody give any solid advice? Need a 1/4' hole.

photo1902 04-29-2019 05:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhonard (Post 1645799)
It seems the header support beams in the lanai of newer concrete homes is concrete surrounded by some sort of mesh metal. I've had terrible success drilling through the mesh metal. Once I break through the metal the concrete is no problem. I've been given all kinds of advice ranging from hammer drilling, going fast, going really slow and of course all the different metal choices (cobalt, titanium etc). I'm sure somebody who does this for a living doesn't use 6 bits to get through this mesh. Can anybody give any solid advice? Need a 1/4' hole.

I've done this many times, and used a hammer drill with a masonry bit.

retiredguy123 04-29-2019 05:36 AM

Try using a smaller bit and then increase to a larger one.

skip0358 04-29-2019 06:09 AM

Hammer Drill & Masonry bit worked for me also.

mhonard 04-29-2019 06:26 PM

Yes, all these ideas work to a degree but it still takes 1/2 hour to drill a 1/4" hole including a lot of backbreaking force. I was told by an installer today that the carbide drill bits dull quickly if you go to fast and/or once you hit the masonry. That might explain why I have varied success. He suggested using self-tapping screws to drill through the metal and then follow up with masonry bit to complete the hole. Throw away the self-tapping screws and use a new one on each hole. I'm going to give this a try. Also, I failed to mention I am drilling very close to the beam edge so the metal mech may be of higher density.

photo1902 04-29-2019 06:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhonard (Post 1646065)
Yes, all these ideas work to a degree but it still takes 1/2 hour to drill a 1/4" hole including a lot of backbreaking force. I was told by an installer today that the carbide drill bits dull quickly if you go to fast and/or once you hit the masonry. That might explain why I have varied success. He suggested using self-tapping screws to drill through the metal and then follow up with masonry bit to complete the hole. Throw away the self-tapping screws and use a new one on each hole. I'm going to give this a try. Also, I failed to mention I am drilling very close to the beam edge so the metal mech may be of higher density.

As someone who does this frequently, you need to make sure you’re using a masonry bit and a hammer drill. Just because a drill bit is “carbide” doesn’t mean it’s a masonry bit. Also, a regular drill (even one equipped with a masonry bit) won’t always do the trick. Not to belabor the point, but I think if you tried a hammer drill and a true masonry bit, you’d see it’s not that difficult.

yobeano 04-30-2019 08:34 AM

Maybe I'm missing something but if you are trying to get through some kind of metal before you hit the concrete then you can't use a masonry bit first. I had this same issue but my beam was square metal box incased and filled with concrete so I used a regular carbide tip bit at low speed to get me through the metal then the masonry bit to finish the hole. I used tap-cons to mount my shades and complete the job.

mhonard 04-30-2019 09:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photo1902 (Post 1646079)
As someone who does this frequently, you need to make sure you’re using a masonry bit and a hammer drill. Just because a drill bit is “carbide” doesn’t mean it’s a masonry bit. Also, a regular drill (even one equipped with a masonry bit) won’t always do the trick. Not to belabor the point, but I think if you tried a hammer drill and a true masonry bit, you’d see it’s not that difficult.

I’m using carbide bit for metal drilling and masonry bit for the masonry. I’m not sure how a masonry bit can cut through metal and the ones I have certainly don’t.

mhonard 04-30-2019 10:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yobeano (Post 1646156)
Maybe I'm missing something but if you are trying to get through some kind of metal before you hit the concrete then you can't use a masonry bit first. I had this same issue but my beam was square metal box encased and filled with concrete so I used a regular carbide tip bit at low speed to get me through the metal than the masonry bit to finish the hole. I used tap-cons to mount my shades and complete the job.

Agreed and understand. It's the getting through the metal that is the difficulty I am having. I am using new carbide bits, slow speed and creeping up to the size I need (1/4"). Takes 4-5 bits and a lot of pressure.

sparky4840 04-30-2019 10:37 AM

Hammer Drill
 
If you are using a hammer drill that makes a lot of noise and goes nowhere, rent a real percussion hammer drill. The bit will go through the metal and concrete with ease.

yobeano 04-30-2019 01:37 PM

Yep it was tough and required a lot of pressure in an awkward position on a ladder. I made eight holes and it took quite a while. I must say I never went through that many bits.

mhonard 04-30-2019 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sparky4840 (Post 1646185)
If you are using a hammer drill that makes a lot of noise and goes nowhere, rent a real percussion hammer drill. The bit will go through the metal and concrete with ease.

Thanks, I have a Ryobi hammer drill driver and seems to work perfectly with masonry. If need be I will take your advice however I have found the idea of using self-tapping screws to drill through the metal works very well. I used a #8 and #10 and pierced the metal in no time. Threw the screws away and used new ones on the next hole. No more dulling bits.

villagetinker 05-01-2019 02:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhonard (Post 1645799)
It seems the header support beams in the lanai of newer concrete homes is concrete surrounded by some sort of mesh metal. I've had terrible success drilling through the mesh metal. Once I break through the metal the concrete is no problem. I've been given all kinds of advice ranging from hammer drilling, going fast, going really slow and of course all the different metal choices (cobalt, titanium etc). I'm sure somebody who does this for a living doesn't use 6 bits to get through this mesh. Can anybody give any solid advice? Need a 1/4' hole.

Mhonard, send me a PM with your phone number and i will give you a call, i have done a few dozen holes just like what you want to do, and I will be glad to discuss what works. NOTE: if your house is like mine (2013 Gardenia) there is a steel (actually stainless steel I think) channel with rebar that is filled with concrete, and then stucco is applied over that. The problem is with the stainless steel.

mhonard 05-02-2019 08:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by villagetinker (Post 1646450)
Mhonard, send me a PM with your phone number and i will give you a call, i have done a few dozen holes just like what you want to do, and I will be glad to discuss what works. NOTE: if your house is like mine (2013 Gardenia) there is a steel (actually stainless steel I think) channel with rebar that is filled with concrete, and then stucco is applied over that. The problem is with the stainless steel.

Thanks but got the job done fast using self-tapping screws to get through the metal mesh.


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