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-   -   Water seeping into carpet from concrete pad (https://www.talkofthevillages.com/forums/villages-florida-general-discussion-73/water-seeping-into-carpet-concrete-pad-302735/)

LadyDi 02-11-2020 04:23 PM

Water seeping into carpet from concrete pad
 
Anyone else have this situation? A few weeks ago I had a wet patch in the center of my master bedroom carpeting. Not even close to the windows or walls. Last night it happened again in a different area. Not a pet stain. No odor, just clean water. I have a frame house (Camelia) with vinyl siding it is about 15 years old. I have gutters around the entire house. Today we had a professional inspection. He tested various areas of the room penetrating the carpet with a special tool. He found evidence of water beyond the normal amount to expect. Apparently concrete always has a slight moisture presence. He inspected the exterior of the house and the windows. Then he pulled back the carpeting and, it appears the water is seeping in from cracks in the concrete. I had planned on replacing the carpeting sometime with wood but now not sure that is a safe choice.

retiredguy123 02-11-2020 04:51 PM

It is not normal for the concrete to have enough moisture to make the carpet wet. I would make sure that the exterior ground is properly sloped away from the house so that rain water does not settle against the house and seep under the concrete floor slab. I would also contact my homeowners insurance company to see if the problem is covered. I definitely would not install a wood or laminate floor directly onto the concrete as long as you have the moisture problem. It may be possible to install a plastic moisture barrier to the concrete floor, and then nail down 3/4 inch furring strips to the concrete and install a real hardwood floor on top of the furring strips. But, this would be a more expensive wood floor than most floor projects in The Villages. Just my opinion. Good luck.

npwalters 02-11-2020 05:16 PM

curious what the professional inspector recommended.

rjm1cc 02-11-2020 06:18 PM

Sounds like a leaking water pipe as we have not had a lot of rain and I assume the problem just started.
Check your water meter to see if water is coming into the house when all fixtures and sprinkler system is turned off.

retiredguy123 02-11-2020 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjm1cc (Post 1717314)
Sounds like a leaking water pipe as we have not had a lot of rain and I assume the problem just started.
Check your water meter to see if water is coming into the house when all fixtures and sprinkler system is turned off.

If it is a water pipe leak, your homeowners insurance will most likely cover all demolition and construction repair cost to locate the leak and replace the concrete and carpet or other damage. I don't think they will cover the actual pipe repair.

NotGolfer 02-11-2020 06:48 PM

Not sure which area of T.V. you live in....a couple of years ago we had water between the laundry-room and kitchen are. The house is a Sun Kist. We have laminate flooring almost through-out. Anyway we called T.V. and asked if they put piping under-neath homes and the answer was they do not. Our issue was a pipe with our heating/air unit. This, we found out, has to have bleach poured in it regularly to clean it out. It was a process, but we had a restoration company come in to check things out. Had industrial fans for a handful of days, insurance people out as well and had to replace some of the flooring as well. That part was a DIY project but a "pain in the tush" just the same. Can't speak to what's causing your water issue but I'd really check with T.V. and maybe the restoration folks as well.

dhsmith 02-11-2020 07:02 PM

Water
 
All the plumbing in your house is under the concrete slab.

retiredguy123 02-11-2020 07:45 PM

If the master bedroom is located in the rear of the house like most houses, there are probably no water pipes under the floor.

BernieJr 02-11-2020 08:26 PM

Call your HVAC contractor. Condensate drain may be plugged.

retiredguy123 02-11-2020 08:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BernieJr (Post 1717334)
Call your HVAC contractor. Condensate drain may be plugged.

Before calling an HVAC contractor, just pour water down the condensate line and see if it comes out the other end outside. Homeowners should know how to do this, and they should pour vinegar through the condensate line every 3 months or so to prevent it from clogging. But I doubt that the condensate line runs under the master bedroom.

Fishers2tall 02-11-2020 09:08 PM

Sounds like a pipe leak in your slab.
 
I am not a plumber but I have owned a house on a slab that had several leaks in the pipes contained in/underneath the slab and that is what your situation sounds like. You probably have a leak under the slab in another room but the water is going through the pea gravel and coming up in a slab crack in your bedroom. There will likely be a plumber in your area with the specialized equipment needed to detect slab leaks. Here in Indiana the fee for slab leak detection is around $150 then you have to hire a plumber to fix the leak. Now opinions vary but my experience has been that if you have one slab leak you will probably have more in the coming years. I hope for your sake this is not what you have because it’s a very expensive repair and if you do have a slab leak the only full proof way to avoid future slab leaks is to replumb your home with PEX tubing in the attic above your ceiling. That will cost you between $5,000 and $10,000. Of course if you have an island sink in your kitchen you won’t be able to completely bypass the water pipes in the slab.

EdFNJ 02-11-2020 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by retiredguy123 (Post 1717340)
Before calling an HVAC contractor, just pour water down the condensate line and see if it comes out the other end outside. Homeowners should know how to do this, and they should pour vinegar through the condensate line every 3 months or so to prevent it from clogging. But I doubt that the condensate line runs under the master bedroom.

I believe ours does since the condenser and condensate drain are at the back corner of the MBr about 3 feet in. There is no window on the back wall on ours it's on the side wall or the condenser would keep us up all night.

retiredguy123 02-11-2020 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EdFNJ (Post 1717351)
I believe ours does since the condenser and condensate drain are at the back corner of the MBr about 3 feet in. There is no window on the back wall on ours it's on the side wall or the condenser would keep us up all night.

Not to belabor the point, but the condenser is the outside unit and doesn't need to be anywhere near the condensate drain line. The condensate drain is at the air handling unit (furnace), which is usually located in the garage. It drains water to the closest point outside of the house. Your house may be different.

Sunflower33 02-12-2020 06:35 AM

I had the same thing in 3 of my bedrooms with my hardwood floors Is popped some of the planks. My house was under warranty but the build stated it wasn’t doing anything as it wasn’t their problem. I had it fixed at my own expense and it happened again in other rooms The flooring guy said the concrete wasn’t sealed

jswirs 02-12-2020 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by retiredguy123 (Post 1717300)
It is not normal for the concrete to have enough moisture to make the carpet wet. I would make sure that the exterior ground is properly sloped away from the house so that rain water does not settle against the house and seep under the concrete floor slab. I would also contact my homeowners insurance company to see if the problem is covered. I definitely would not install a wood or laminate floor directly onto the concrete as long as you have the moisture problem. It may be possible to install a plastic moisture barrier to the concrete floor, and then nail down 3/4 inch furring strips to the concrete and install a real hardwood floor on top of the furring strips. But, this would be a more expensive wood floor than most floor projects in The Villages. Just my opinion. Good luck.

Good idea! Or, there is a tongue and groove "composite" type of flooring which is very resilient, less susceptible to water damage, which also is available in wood tones.


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