Restaurant Discussion in TV

Restaurant Discussion in TV

Notices

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 04-30-2019, 08:14 AM
collie1228 collie1228 is offline
Gold member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Villa San Antonio; Formerly Syracuse, New York
Posts: 1,032
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kcrazorbackfan View Post
And then there are there are those here that want a "fine dining" restaurant; it would probably close before the 1st months bills come due when they see what the pricing of the food and drink is.
I agree completely. While I don't see the "new" Lopez restaurant as "fine dining", it is a step up from the norm around here. We recently enjoyed lunch with our couples golf group and one of the couples told of their recent dinner experience at Lopez, which they said was good, but the bill for two was over $100.00 (including wine). The table seemed surprised at a dinner bill that high. I think that's probably the prevailing view in The Villages, and that's why a real "fine dining" restaurant would be a major risk for an investor. Unfortunately, you need a reliable expense account clientele to make it work.
Reply With Quote

  #12  
Old 04-30-2019, 09:25 AM
Jazuela Jazuela is offline
Veteran member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 933
Default

I think part of the problem is the expansion of the Villages itself. The further out the property line extends, the less likely people are to venture out and try places that aren't closer to home. It means Villagers are, for all intents and purposes, a captive audience. The only way some of them can encourage competition, is to consider competition as being a good 1/2 hour's drive away. That's not competition. When your only competition is the other country club that serves the same menu that you serve, getting the food from the same vendors you get them from, and have the same hiring practices you have, there's no competition at all. It's just more of the same, more "acceptable" food. Nothing to reach out and say "HEY this guy down the block is doing a stellar job - it's time for MY restaurant to step up its game."

They have no incentive to do better, because they know most people will stay close to home. And the Developer gets to decide which restaurants rent in this enormous multi-square-mile area.

I'm guessing there was a lot more variety, and a lot more quality options within a 15-minute drive of a Villages home, back when it only took 10 minutes to get from the center of the Villages to the border of the Villages in any direction. But The Villages now owns all of that property, and the quality and service and variety is subject to the whims of the Developer, who determines the rent that these business owners will have to pay them.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #13  
Old 04-30-2019, 09:44 AM
rustyp rustyp is offline
Gold member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,119
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
I think part of the problem is the expansion of the Villages itself. The further out the property line extends, the less likely people are to venture out and try places that aren't closer to home. It means Villagers are, for all intents and purposes, a captive audience. The only way some of them can encourage competition, is to consider competition as being a good 1/2 hour's drive away. That's not competition. When your only competition is the other country club that serves the same menu that you serve, getting the food from the same vendors you get them from, and have the same hiring practices you have, there's no competition at all. It's just more of the same, more "acceptable" food. Nothing to reach out and say "HEY this guy down the block is doing a stellar job - it's time for MY restaurant to step up its game."

They have no incentive to do better, because they know most people will stay close to home. And the Developer gets to decide which restaurants rent in this enormous multi-square-mile area.

I'm guessing there was a lot more variety, and a lot more quality options within a 15-minute drive of a Villages home, back when it only took 10 minutes to get from the center of the Villages to the border of the Villages in any direction. But The Villages now owns all of that property, and the quality and service and variety is subject to the whims of the Developer, who determines the rent that these business owners will have to pay them.
BINGO
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-30-2019, 10:18 AM
Madelaine Amee's Avatar
Madelaine Amee Madelaine Amee is offline
Sage
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: The Villages North
Posts: 3,435
Default

I did not start this thread with the idea of fine dining. My main reason was to start a discussion on why the original Country Clubs have been brought close to bankruptcy by the next generation of owners. Have they never heard of "If it 'aint broke don't fix it". In the case of Glenview, which is the point of this discussion, the new owner purchased a thriving business with excellent wait staff who knew the customers inside out, knew what we drank, knew what we liked to eat, knew where we liked to sit. In a matter of days he had completely changed everything. He lost his staff and his customer base, and I think he probably lost his shirt.

People who know Glenview will agree that Friday night was THE night in the lounge, two TVs behind the bar, people waiting in line to get a drink and a seat at the bar, people waiting in line to get a table in the lounge area. We were regulars and every Friday night there used to be a table of probably 20+ friends and their wives who would come in from golf to eat and drink there. It was nothing for them to eat and drink all night. Their favorite waiter was a friend of ours and that person walked away with a couple of hundred on a Friday night. BUT, as well as the lounge being full, the Dining Room and the Garden Room were always busy. This is not just in snowbird season, this was all year round.

The sheer stupidity of someone to purchase this business and in the blink of an eye ruin it is beyond my imagination.

To the point of leaving TV to dine .... yes, I agree with you for fine dining, but to be able to go out in your golf cart to a local country club restaurant, have a meal and a couple or three drinks and drive home safely in your golf cart .... well, it just cannot be beat!

I should add that we don't look for fine dining in TV. We wait until we go back to the Boston area for the type of meals we consider to be fine dining .... mainly lobster at the coast and Italian in the North End!
__________________
A people free to choose will always choose peace.

Law of Logical Argument: Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about!

Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-02-2019, 06:55 PM
Aloha1 Aloha1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 465
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by collie1228 View Post
I agree completely. While I don't see the "new" Lopez restaurant as "fine dining", it is a step up from the norm around here. We recently enjoyed lunch with our couples golf group and one of the couples told of their recent dinner experience at Lopez, which they said was good, but the bill for two was over $100.00 (including wine). The table seemed surprised at a dinner bill that high. I think that's probably the prevailing view in The Villages, and that's why a real "fine dining" restaurant would be a major risk for an investor. Unfortunately, you need a reliable expense account clientele to make it work.
Well then, perhaps you could explain the overwhelming success of Bluefin at Brownwood. Yes, there exists a portion of Villagers who think simple meat and potatoes is all they need and at no higher a price than $10. But there is a growing population here that wants better quality and variety of food and for which they are willing to pay. There is room for both. I don't think the new owners of Lopez built a menu that would ensure they were out of business in a few months.
__________________
Roseville, MI, East Lansing, MI, Okemos, MI, Kapalua, HI, Village of Pine Ridge
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-02-2019, 07:07 PM
Jazuela Jazuela is offline
Veteran member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 933
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Madelaine Amee View Post
I did not start this thread with the idea of fine dining. My main reason was to start a discussion on why the original Country Clubs have been brought close to bankruptcy by the next generation of owners. Have they never heard of "If it 'aint broke don't fix it". In the case of Glenview, which is the point of this discussion, the new owner purchased a thriving business with excellent wait staff who knew the customers inside out, knew what we drank, knew what we liked to eat, knew where we liked to sit. In a matter of days he had completely changed everything. He lost his staff and his customer base, and I think he probably lost his shirt.

People who know Glenview will agree that Friday night was THE night in the lounge, two TVs behind the bar, people waiting in line to get a drink and a seat at the bar, people waiting in line to get a table in the lounge area. We were regulars and every Friday night there used to be a table of probably 20+ friends and their wives who would come in from golf to eat and drink there. It was nothing for them to eat and drink all night. Their favorite waiter was a friend of ours and that person walked away with a couple of hundred on a Friday night. BUT, as well as the lounge being full, the Dining Room and the Garden Room were always busy. This is not just in snowbird season, this was all year round.

The sheer stupidity of someone to purchase this business and in the blink of an eye ruin it is beyond my imagination.

To the point of leaving TV to dine .... yes, I agree with you for fine dining, but to be able to go out in your golf cart to a local country club restaurant, have a meal and a couple or three drinks and drive home safely in your golf cart .... well, it just cannot be beat!

I should add that we don't look for fine dining in TV. We wait until we go back to the Boston area for the type of meals we consider to be fine dining .... mainly lobster at the coast and Italian in the North End!
I'll never forget Mama Catina's in the North End. It was a tiny little place, only had I believe 5 tables, reservation only, no take-out. I also remember that the North End was the safest place to live, if you were a single female. "The Family" kept a close protective eye over their own.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-03-2019, 05:35 PM
pauld315 pauld315 is offline
Veteran member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: NY, FL, PA, TX, NC, TV
Posts: 999
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunny70 View Post
I really hope that the new people taking over the Restaurant on May 1st will make it a "go to "place. Those of us who live north of 466 don't have a lot of options when it comes to a good place to eat. We have Lopez (which is great) and Franchesco's (which I love), but after that, not so much.
I think there is an abundance of places north of 466. Spanish Springs has many, Tierra del Sol is great and there are many good places out on 441 south of Spanish Springs.
__________________
"The secret of successful managing is to keep the five guys who hate you away from the four guys who haven't made up their minds." - Casey Stengel
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
business, money, takes, change, people

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:47 PM.