AC temp while on vacation

AC temp while on vacation

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  #21  
Old 05-05-2019, 03:46 PM
coffeebean coffeebean is offline
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When we were seasonal residents, we set our humidistat to 60% and set the HVAC to 83 for COOL and 45 for HEAT. We kept the ceiling fans on low. We did that for 9 months a year for 3 years until we moved here full time. The house smelled fresh as a daisy every time we came back after 9 months away.
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  #22  
Old 05-05-2019, 05:42 PM
tophcfa tophcfa is online now
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We leave our A/C at 82 and an insurance policy against mold, in case the A/C stops working, we keep a de-humidifier on the kitchen counter which drains into the sink and set it to go on if the humidity in the house reaches 60%. As long as the A/C is working, the de-humidifier should not need to go on. I sleep better knowing we have a back up system to protect against possible mold damage. We don't leave any ceiling fans on.
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  #23  
Old 05-05-2019, 07:55 PM
UpNorth UpNorth is offline
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The "Dehum away mode" on my new Honeywell thermostat sets he default position as 60% humidity, 80F Degrees Temp. Always tried to do this with my old thermostat and add-on analog humdistat.
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  #24  
Old 05-06-2019, 05:22 AM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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I don't think that a room de-humidifier will have much effect at all on the humidity in the entire house.
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  #25  
Old 05-06-2019, 05:31 AM
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dewilson58 dewilson58 is offline
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One "expert" opinion:

Home » FAQs » What is the Recommended Humidity Level for my Home?
What Is The Recommended Humidity For My Home?

Everyone has their own preferences when it comes to what indoor humidity level is most comfortable. In general, a relative humidity level between 35 to 50 percent is ideal for comfort and to prevent microorganism growth.


Ideal Indoor Relative Humidity Levels by Outdoor Temperature

The most comfortable indoor humidity level will vary from one household to the next, depending on personal preferences. In general, this temperature guide will show you where to keep your indoor relative humidity levels to ensure comfort.

Outdoor temperature over 50˚F, indoor humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 50%
Outdoor temperature over 20˚F, indoor humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 40%
Outdoor temperature between 10˚F and 20˚F, indoor humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 35%
Outdoor temperature between 0˚F and 10˚F, indoor humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 30%
Outdoor temperature between -10˚F and 0˚F, indoor humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 25%
Outdoor temperature between -20˚F and -10˚F, indoor humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 20%
Outdoor temperature at -20˚F or lower, indoor humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 15%


Maintaining Ideal Relative Humidity Levels in the Home

The best tools to keeping relative humidity at ideal levels in your home year-round are whole-home humidifiers and dehumidifiers. These systems automatically work with your home’s heating and cooling systems to add or remove moisture from the air. Utilize a humidifier in winter months when air is naturally drier, and a dehumidifier in the summer when air naturally carries more moisture.


Problems with High Humidity Indoors

When humidity levels are high in the home, there is too much moisture. This not only causes discomfort, but can be damaging to your home.

Excess moisture promotes the growth and spread of mold, mildew, fungi, bacteria, and viruses. These contaminants diminish indoor air quality, causing illness, and can also cause damage to your home.
When indoor humidity levels are too high, asthma and allergy sufferers may experience worse or more frequent symptoms.
High humidity indoors causes the home to feel muggy. You may notice visible condensation on windows and walls. Mugginess can leave you feeling hot and uncomfortable, turning up the air conditioning and expending more energy when just an adjustment in humidity levels are required. This causes more energy to be consumed unnecessarily, increasing your energy bills.


Problems Caused by Low Humidity Indoors

Low relative humidity levels indoors cause a host of issues for people and households.

When indoor air is too dry, asthma and allergy symptoms can worsen. Cold and flu viruses may spread more rapidly, and you may be more prone to sinus infections. You may suffer dry skin, chapped lips, and dry air passageways.
Dry air causes your body to feel colder, despite a warm indoor temperature. The dry air pulls moisture from your skin, leaving you colder and forcing you to turn up the temperature to stay comfortable. Therefore, more energy is expended to heat the home, when a boost in humidity could have kept you comfortable for less.
Dry air is damaging to homes. Wood and other building materials, as well as furniture, are robbed of moisture when air is dry. Cracks and damage can occur to flooring, trim, and even framing around windows and doors.


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  #26  
Old 05-06-2019, 05:39 AM
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dewilson58 dewilson58 is offline
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  #27  
Old 05-06-2019, 08:22 AM
B-flat B-flat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peterriess View Post
I installed a Nest thermostat. It has a setting called "Cool to Dry". It controls both temp and humidity. So far it has worked like a charm. No mold, mildew or musty odors. Munns did the installation. programed the thermostat and my iPhone for remote setting.
We had Munn’s install a Nest thermostat too. We check daily via our iPhones the status of the AC. At present we have the AC set to 80. At one time when we had a home in Ocala we set the thermostat to 83 in our absence. I was not aware of the “cool to dry” feature. Thanks for posting that.
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  #28  
Old 05-06-2019, 10:12 AM
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Toymeister Toymeister is offline
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Dewilson:

Just for kicks I looked at the average monthly humidity that renters chose for the past six months. They can choose whatever temp/humidity that they want. It varied from 53 to 57%. This simple average was 54.5.

Not a large enough sample but interesting that no one wanted 50% or less. Six different couples.
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  #29  
Old 05-06-2019, 10:58 AM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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50 percent or less would be difficult to maintain without a whole house dehumidifier, which most houses do not have. But, I wonder about the mold and mildew issue, because the humidity in my garage is usually way higher than 50 percent, and I have never had any mold or mildew in the house or the garage.
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  #30  
Old 05-06-2019, 09:22 PM
ricthemic ricthemic is offline
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Worked 40 years in HVAC service up north. So I have a question regarding all these temperature/dehumidifier post.
Question for full timers and snowbirds. Whatever you set your interior controls at for comfort and or to protect your house from mold during six months of Florida high temps and humidity, why isn’t every garage then loaded with mold?
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