Anyone know how outside faucet is connected to plumbing?

Anyone know how outside faucet is connected to plumbing?

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  #11  
Old 01-03-2019, 04:51 PM
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villagetinker villagetinker is offline
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Just a word of caution, if you remove the 'vacuum breaker' and do not replace, you may in violation of the law if and when you decide to sell your house. As noted above, the repair or rebuild of a valve is easily done once the water is shut off. i have done this several time, and have never had to revmove the valve body. Even had to replace the valve seat twice, the valve body remained.
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  #12  
Old 01-03-2019, 04:56 PM
thetruth thetruth is offline
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[QUOTE=EdFNJ;1612921]I guess it would be different depending on type of home. This is a wood frame built construction 10 yrs old in Amelia.

I'm pretty good at plumbing especially with CPVC pipe and I need to replace the outside hose bib. I removed the 4 screws marked with arrows. I am guessing the bib is connected to a cpvc to threaded adapter but don't want to twist it off and break it inside the wall. The bib seems to be attached (with sealant?) to that white block of whatever behind it. If I turn the bib with my hand the block moves so I am afraid I might break whatever water line is behind it..

Anyone ever take one of these off? Is it threaded to the cpvc? Replacing it is no problem if I can remove it.












You state it is Ten Years old. Our water quality is, well not so great. That brass spigot is probably not top quality. You may well find if you put a wrench on it and put some force on it that you will find it turns to dust.

Obviously, be sure you have a second valve on the inside that shuts just that spigot off. That was code in NY not sure if it is here. If, you need to shut off the entire house and you then get into trouble well been there done that. Not all but some of the people a Home Depo and Lowes truly know what they are doing.
You might also look at a neighbors home and see if it is the same as yours. If, you are not the original owner, it may have been an issue previously and someone glued the spigot on.

As to my suggestion that it may have been an issue previously, That extension threaded on to the valve looks like it is the wrong valve. The handle does not seem to be ten years old and it seems it is too close to the siding to be easy to use.
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  #13  
Old 01-03-2019, 05:41 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villagetinker View Post
Just a word of caution, if you remove the 'vacuum breaker' and do not replace, you may in violation of the law if and when you decide to sell your house. As noted above, the repair or rebuild of a valve is easily done once the water is shut off. i have done this several time, and have never had to revmove the valve body. Even had to replace the valve seat twice, the valve body remained.
If the vacuum breaker is causing the leak, you can cut it off and replace it with another vacuum breaker and still be legal. You can screw a new vacuum breaker on and not use the set screw. The problem with the set screw is that it is designed to be non-removable. So, when you screw it tight and then try to remove it, the top part will break off making it almost impossible to unscrew.
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  #14  
Old 01-03-2019, 05:51 PM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villagetinker View Post
Just a word of caution, if you remove the 'vacuum breaker' and do not replace, you may in violation of the law if and when you decide to sell your house. As noted above, the repair or rebuild of a valve is easily done once the water is shut off. i have done this several time, and have never had to revmove the valve body. Even had to replace the valve seat twice, the valve body remained.
Law? Maybe a code. In any case It's not the valve. It's probably a cross thread on the vacuum breaker. Tried plumbers tape didn't help. Never had them up north. Don't intend on selling home until we are both pushing up daisies so I will let whoever inherits our home worry about calling the plumber assuming I don't replace it. I’m sure there are other “laws” that have been broken as well.



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  #15  
Old 01-03-2019, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Mleeja View Post
I’d call Mike Scott Plumbing and let the professionals handle it.
Sometimes Warranty will surprise you and have the original contractor check it out and possibly fix it.

Warranty has always been very nice to me, but I have never called up and raised hell either.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2019, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
Good luck. I have never done it, but the Youtube videos make it look easy.
I found a video but the setscrew is probably on the bottom because I can't see it and of course the bibb is behind a couple large shrubs! Maybe I'll just break it off with a 20lb sledgehammer.

JUST KIDDING! (on the sledgehammer, a sawzall will probably work )
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2019, 07:26 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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Again, good luck. You may not need to cut the vacuum breaker where the set screw is located. If you make two cuts through the vacuum breaker, you can probably pry it off. Try not to damage the hose bibb threads.
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2019, 07:40 PM
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It’s been a while, but last time I had a leak8ng hose bib, all I had to do was remove the handle and replace the washer at the bottom of the valve. Have they changed?
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2019, 07:59 PM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
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Originally Posted by Mikeod View Post
It’s been a while, but last time I had a leak8ng hose bib, all I had to do was remove the handle and replace the washer at the bottom of the valve. Have they changed?

As I mentioned in a couple previous posts it is not the washer, the stem or the valve. I am 100% sure of that.

There is probably a bad thread on the vacuum breaker because when the water is turned OFF there is no leak. When the water is turned ON it leaks from the vacuum breaker thread on the hose bibb. Yes, I often leave the water ON because I have a timer that waters an area so when the timer is OFF (and the valve is opened) I get a slow leak from the vacuum breaker thread.
From what I have been reading these "vacuum breakers" have a 5-10 year life expectancy and this is 10yrs old.
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2019, 08:37 PM
tophcfa tophcfa is offline
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Had the same problem when we bought our house. The valve leaked and spewed water all over when being shut off. I just turned off the water, put a pair of channel lock pliers on the faulty fixture, and unscrewed it. Replaced it with a regular hose fixture that does not have that stupid vacuum breaker thing. I put plumbers tape and silicone on the pipe threads when installing the new hose fixture so there would not be any leaks. Never had a problem since. I was told I would have to put on one of those vacuum breaker things if I ever sold the house so it would pass inspection. I will deal with that if the time ever comes? The backwash issue into the water supply is ridiculous. First, the water pressure would have to go to zero, and second, a hose would have to be attached to the fixture where the hose was submerged in contaminated waste, and then back pressure would have to be initiated. That equation is just about impossible, and would never happen at my house since the hose is always either reeled up or totally disconnected. Now when I shut off my hose I no longer get soaked by the vacuum breaker, and no more leaks. All good.
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