Auto Insurance Requirement for Snowbirds

Auto Insurance Requirement for Snowbirds

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  #11  
Old 09-10-2019, 10:35 AM
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dewilson58 dewilson58 is online now
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Originally Posted by villagetinker View Post
I wonder if the insurance company would balk on paying a claim if they were aware or suspected the car was in a location for more than 90 days.



Yes.

People will go to the greed comment really fast, but it's not.

From the underwriting prospective, Florida has very different risks.

If "you" are not willing to pay for these exposures, a carrier does not have to pay on claims.
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  #12  
Old 09-10-2019, 06:57 PM
Gpsma Gpsma is offline
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Mr Helpful...you are not...far from it.

Once an insurance comapny writes your policy and accepts payment, they are legally obligated to pay the claim. Insurance companies know people lie. The best thwy can do is come after u for the additional premium.
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  #13  
Old 09-10-2019, 07:33 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is online now
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Originally Posted by Gpsma View Post
Mr Helpful...you are not...far from it.

Once an insurance comapny writes your policy and accepts payment, they are legally obligated to pay the claim. Insurance companies know people lie. The best thwy can do is come after u for the additional premium.
Really? What law says that someone can buy an insurance policy and lie on the application, and the insurance company has no legal recourse but to pay whatever claim is filed? I think insurance companies may pay small dollar claims. But, if you file a large claim, the company has insurance investigators who will do everything they can to protect the legal rights of the insurance company. If the policyholder lied on the application, the company can and will deny the claim.
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  #14  
Old 09-10-2019, 07:52 PM
Gpsma Gpsma is offline
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Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
Really? What law says that someone can buy an insurance policy and lie on the application, and the insurance company has no legal recourse but to pay whatever claim is filed? I think insurance companies may pay small dollar claims. But, if you file a large claim, the company has insurance investigators who will do everything they can to protect the legal rights of the insurance company. If the policyholder lied on the application, the company can and will deny the claim.
Auto insurance is different than if u lied about your house or business and it burnt down.

Auto insurance doesnt only protect you but protects others if u are negligible.

Simply think.
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  #15  
Old 09-10-2019, 10:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Gpsma View Post
Mr Helpful...you are not...far from it.

Once an insurance comapny writes your policy and accepts payment, they are legally obligated to pay the claim. Insurance companies know people lie. The best thwy can do is come after u for the additional premium.



A small amount of knowledge is a very dangerous thing.

You are so wrong.

Any misrepresentation or fraud will allow the carrier to deny a claim.

That's fine if you want to take the risk, but don't misrepresent for the OP.
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  #16  
Old 09-10-2019, 10:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
Really? What law says that someone can buy an insurance policy and lie on the application, and the insurance company has no legal recourse but to pay whatever claim is filed? I think insurance companies may pay small dollar claims. But, if you file a large claim, the company has insurance investigators who will do everything they can to protect the legal rights of the insurance company. If the policyholder lied on the application, the company can and will deny the claim.





You are correct.

False statements by others could really cost the OP.

I could not sleep with myself.
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  #17  
Old 09-11-2019, 08:31 AM
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No, "any" misrepresentation will not result in a denial of a claim. It has to be a material one that would have caused the insurance company to never issue the policy. If that's the case, the carrier rescinds the policy from the inception date and returns all premiums.

So lets say there is a household member who's license was suspended fro DWI and insured lied on app that no person in the household has had such an infraction. That's a material misrepresentation. Policy could be rescinded.

If you say you only drive car 6,000 miles a year and get into the best rating class for lowest premiums and carrier finds out you actually log 12,000 miles a year, you'll get your premiums raised but won't be cancelled or have claims denied.

If you are in Florida 9 months a year your policy conditions aren't prefaced upon Floridia's financial liability laws. The normal policy conditions apply and they'll handle any claims on their merits. Only thing that may be lacking would be the $10,000 in required PIP benefits, which aren't typically written in non no-fault states. Many policies automatically role on mandatory FR limits for their insureds involved in out of state losses. So that may also happen.

Can't imagine a carrier denying a claim because you car was garaged in Florida versus the state of issuance. Risk hasn't increased and there is no policy language stating car must be garaged in state of issuance. I guess if you garage your car in Miami versus Fargo, North Dakota for a few months there is an increase in risk, but they can always adjust the premiums for that, but denial of claim would be tough to do.
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  #18  
Old 09-11-2019, 08:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jess1980 View Post
No, "any" misrepresentation will not result in a denial of a claim. It has to be a material one that would have caused the insurance company to never issue the policy. If that's the case, the carrier rescinds the policy from the inception date and returns all premiums.

So lets say there is a household member who's license was suspended fro DWI and insured lied on app that no person in the household has had such an infraction. That's a material misrepresentation. Policy could be rescinded.

If you say you only drive car 6,000 miles a year and get into the best rating class for lowest premiums and carrier finds out you actually log 12,000 miles a year, you'll get your premiums raised but won't be cancelled or have claims denied.

If you are in Florida 9 months a year your policy conditions aren't prefaced upon Floridia's financial liability laws. The normal policy conditions apply and they'll handle any claims on their merits. Only thing that may be lacking would be the $10,000 in required PIP benefits, which aren't typically written in non no-fault states. Many policies automatically role on mandatory FR limits for their insureds involved in out of state losses. So that may also happen.

Can't imagine a carrier denying a claim because you car was garaged in Florida versus the state of issuance. Risk hasn't increased and there is no policy language stating car must be garaged in state of issuance. I guess if you garage your car in Miami versus Fargo, North Dakota for a few months there is an increase in risk, but they can always adjust the premiums for that, but denial of claim would be tough to do.



BINGO!!!!!!
Your imagination limits advice.


Your statement "but denial of claim would be tough to do" agrees denial could happen.
A $1mil claim, "tough" to deny becomes much easier.


Not sure who has the bigger cowboy hat, I would recommend honesty & talking to your insurance carrier.
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  #19  
Old 09-11-2019, 09:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dewilson58 View Post
A small amount of knowledge is a very dangerous thing.

You are so wrong.

Any misrepresentation or fraud will allow the carrier to deny a claim.

That's fine if you want to take the risk, but don't misrepresent for the OP.
This seems to make the most sense to me.
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  #20  
Old 09-12-2019, 03:57 PM
M2inOR M2inOR is offline
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Here is a different situation I've wondered about:

We just purchased a home in Marsh Ben, with the intent to become a permanent resident of Florida. As we currently live in Oregon, and have a home here, we know we must do certain things to change our domicile to Florida. Our Oregon home will become a 2nd vacation home for the summer months until we sell it.

We have no intention of driving our Oregon cars down to Florida (2006 and 2008) and will initially just rent, then eventually purchase a vehicle for use in Florida; it will be registered in FL, of course.

We also travel quite a bit, and expect that to continue for a few years.

Reading thru this thread, I interpret the 90 day requirement a bit confusing. I plan to inform my insurance company (USAA) of our intent.

Anyone with this type of situation?

Thanks.

Mike
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