Concrete Work in the Villages

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  #1  
Old 07-15-2007, 06:38 PM
REDCART REDCART is offline
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Default Concrete Work in the Villages

It would be great if someone out there with a background in construction could offer an opinion on this post. Many people have observed and commented about the unusual staining of concrete work in the Villages. Some of you may recall that TV specifically excludes concrete staining as a bulding defect in their sales contracts.

People have commented that it's because they use pond water to mix the cement. Even if they used water from the fire hydrants, this is also recycled water that is reclaimed from the storm sewers and yard drains. For years, I've always understood that you must use clean potable water for mixing cement and I wonder what the result would be long term from the impurities and chemical residue in this recycled water--other than the obvious staining of the foundation slab, etc.

Is this info news to anyone?
  #2  
Old 07-15-2007, 07:03 PM
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ewstanley ewstanley is offline
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Default Re: Concrete Work in the Villages

The following is from the Concrete Basics Home Page

http://www.cement.org/basics/concret...retebasics.asp



Although most drinking water is suitable for use in concrete, aggregates are chosen carefully. Aggregates comprise 60 to 75 percent of the total volume of concrete. The type and size of the aggregate mixture depends on the thickness and purpose of the final concrete product. Almost any natural water that is drinkable and has no pronounced taste or odor may be used as mixing water for concrete. However, some waters that are not fit for drinking may be suitable for concrete.

Excessive impurities in mixing water not only may affect setting time and concrete strength, but also may cause efflorescence, staining, corrosion of reinforcement, volume instability, and reduced durability. Specifications usually set limits on chlorides, sulfates, alkalis, and solids in mixing water unless tests can be performed to determine the effect the impurity has on various properties. Relatively thin building sections call for small coarse aggregate, though aggregates up to six inches (150 mm) in diameter have been used in large dams. A continuous gradation of particle sizes is desirable for efficient use of the paste. In addition, aggregates should be clean and free from any matter that might affect the quality of the concrete.


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Old 07-15-2007, 07:11 PM
REDCART REDCART is offline
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Default Re: Concrete Work in the Villages

Thanks for the quick response. This info suggests that the staining may be nothing more than cosmetic and we can live with that. I thought it might affect the strength of the concrete job. George
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Old 07-16-2007, 06:15 AM
mejahu mejahu is offline
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Default Re: Concrete Work in the Villages

I didn't know there was that much to know about concrete!! How would a person know if it was mixed correctly or not until it deteriorated? ???
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Old 07-16-2007, 06:41 AM
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Default Re: Concrete Work in the Villages

Hi,

Here is another good website that I found about concrete.

It is full of really good information.

It is from a website based in Michigan (where we currently live) so you can disregard some of the weather related information.

I hope that it helps.


:bigthumbsup:

http://www.inspectmichigan.com/concrete.htm

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Old 07-16-2007, 12:07 PM
mejahu mejahu is offline
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Default Re: Concrete Work in the Villages

Thanks for the good information. I guess that explains why our old house in Indiana has cracks in the basement floor and driveway! It seem as though it would be hard to be sure of what was going on with slab structures especially in Florida. I suppose most of the houses in the Villages are built on slabs? How solid could swampy land be? Just wondering if anyone has problems with them. ???
  #7  
Old 07-14-2011, 05:09 PM
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Default Concrete work

I am thinking of extending my lanai and need concrete poured but don't have a clue who to call that is responsible and reasonable. Does anyone have any suggestions and recommendations regarding this process? Thank you in advance!!
  #8  
Old 07-14-2011, 05:14 PM
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Boudicca Boudicca is offline
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Default Good concrete company

I just used an excellent company "EDGE" they poured my patio and were very reasonably priced

Last edited by Boudicca; 10-21-2011 at 06:53 PM.
  #9  
Old 07-14-2011, 06:14 PM
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I'd like to know why in South Florida all concrete slabs for homes have steel reinforcement and steel road mesh and these in TV have none.
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:24 PM
pauld315 pauld315 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JTW View Post
I am thinking of extending my lanai and need concrete poured but don't have a clue who to call that is responsible and reasonable. Does anyone have any suggestions and recommendations regarding this process? Thank you in advance!!
I don't but I do notice that the advertiser (Jerome's General Contracting) at the top of the page does concrete work. Would be nice to at least get an estimate from an advertiser on TOTV.
  #11  
Old 07-14-2011, 08:34 PM
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Default steel/concrete

our new cement patio has steel rods in it.
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Old 07-14-2011, 09:22 PM
kaydee kaydee is offline
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We've used Robey Construction for several concrete jobs and have been very happy with is his & costs.
  #13  
Old 07-14-2011, 11:55 PM
handyman handyman is offline
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Default concrete

I have been a UNION journeyman cementmason for 40 yrs,In local 161 it takes 4 years to atain journeyman status ,that is 40 hours a week plus the evenings and weekends that are spent in the classroom,these are young men that have applied their trade to build our country,I guess you get what you pay for
  #14  
Old 07-15-2011, 12:28 AM
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I was just thinking,could we have our patios sent from China,I'm sure that would be the RIGHT thing to do..............


















  #15  
Old 07-15-2011, 06:44 AM
mulligan mulligan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shimpy View Post
I'd like to know why in South Florida all concrete slabs for homes have steel reinforcement and steel road mesh and these in TV have none.
Generally, there are 2 choices in reinforcement of building slabs in Florida. Steel mesh, usually 8x8 squares of welded #10 wire, with added 1/2 or 5/8 steel bar at the perimeter, or perimeter bars with fiberglass in the mix (sometimes called fibercrete). Both can be engineered to provide correct support and finished surface. This is really an oversimplification, but the general idea applies.
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