Do water filters help?  See photo.

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  #31  
Old 01-07-2019, 05:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rapscallion St Croix View Post
Thumbs up for filters but I am not a fan of soft water showering. Some call the feeling silky, some call it slimy.
With a softener, you have two choices to use to regen the resin (or called back washing)

Most common is salt, that will result in "the feeling silky, some call it slimy"

The reaction between a triglyceride molecule (fat) and sodium hydroxide (lye) to make soap yields a molecule of glycerol with three ionically bonded molecules of sodium stearate (the soap part of soap). This sodium salt will give up the sodium ion to water, while the stearate ion will precipitate out of solution if it comes into contact with an ion that binds it more strongly than sodium (such as the magnesium or calcium in hard water).

The magnesium stearate or calcium stearate is a waxy solid that you know as soap scum. It can form a ring in your tub, but it rinses off your body. The sodium or potassium in soft water makes it much more unfavorable for the sodium stearate to give up its sodium ion so that it can form an insoluble compound and get rinsed away.

Instead, the stearate clings to the slightly charged surface of your skin. Essentially, soap would rather stick to you than get rinsed away in soft water.

We recommend using Potassium chloride rather than salt to eliminate that slippery-when wet feeling after rinsing the soap off. Also you're not adding salt to your drinking water.

During the softening process, sodium is released from the exchange media into the output water. For every grain of hardness removed from water,

8 mg/1 (ppm) of sodium is added. People on restricted sodium intake diets should account for increased levels of sodium in softened water. Your family physician should be consulted.

Sodium intake from softened water can be avoided by have a reverse osmosis kitchen tap drinking and cooking.

Substituting potassium chloride for sodium chloride may be appropriate if health or environmental reasons necessitate restricting sodium.

Potassium chloride is more expensive and adheres more strongly to the resin, reducing the exchange efficiency when compared with sodium chloride.

Salt is about $7 a bag Potassium is $30
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  #32  
Old 01-07-2019, 06:22 PM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MorTech View Post
It's amazing that Michael Phelps isn't dead from Chlorine. He must be Superman

Sometimes they have to "shock" the water with chlorine, so chlorine levels can vary greatly.
The county does yearly water purity tests and posts them online. TV water in pretty clean but filters make a big difference in taste and plumbing buildup. I set my water softener to 11 Grains.
My problem isn't with the chlorine as an additive as I am sure it won't make me sick because it is controlled (famous last words), the problem for me is it stinks and it kills my wife's hair. By getting rid of the chlorine both those problems have been noticeably solved. Let them clean the water up to my front door, that's wonderful, but once it gets in my house I don't want it. I'm thankful the "county does yearly testing" but many things could possibly happen in the 364 days they do not test like using more than needed on any of those days.
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Re: Reported calcium build up
  #33  
Old 01-07-2019, 08:14 PM
thetruth thetruth is offline
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Default Re: Reported calcium build up

Quote:
Originally Posted by CFrance View Post
We just moved in to a 6-yr-old house that had no water system previously. CLR is working somewhat to remove the water spots, but it is a struggle and will take awhile. Plus some of the spots have eroded the porcelain sinks.


I can compare prices of water filtration/softener systems because we have had them in every house since the 1980s. The Nova + softener is the least expensive we have ever had, and I believe the water is cleaner and tastes better than we have ever had.



Jimbo gave a good explanation over the phone, presented a couple of choices, and Brad did an excellent installation.

Porcelain is essentially a glass coating on metal. You may have a calcium coating on your sink but it has not eroded the sink-it is a coating on the sink. Try using vinegar on it. Do not use vinegar with chlorine bleach as it will release chlorine gas. You can also use vinegar to clean shower heads etc.
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  #34  
Old 01-07-2019, 08:33 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is online now
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To remove calcium deposits from porcelain sinks and toilets, buy a pumice stone at the swimming pool section at Home Depot or at ACE Hardware. Get it wet and gently rub it on the deposits. It works WAY better than CLR or vinegar. But, I wouldn't use it on a shower head or faucet. I had heavy calcium deposits on my toilet bowls, and they were sparkling clean in less than 10 minutes.

Last edited by retiredguy123; 01-07-2019 at 08:53 PM.
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  #35  
Old 01-08-2019, 10:45 AM
New Englander New Englander is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimbo2012 View Post
With a softener, you have two choices to use to regen the resin (or called back washing)

Most common is salt, that will result in "the feeling silky, some call it slimy"

The reaction between a triglyceride molecule (fat) and sodium hydroxide (lye) to make soap yields a molecule of glycerol with three ionically bonded molecules of sodium stearate (the soap part of soap). This sodium salt will give up the sodium ion to water, while the stearate ion will precipitate out of solution if it comes into contact with an ion that binds it more strongly than sodium (such as the magnesium or calcium in hard water).

The magnesium stearate or calcium stearate is a waxy solid that you know as soap scum. It can form a ring in your tub, but it rinses off your body. The sodium or potassium in soft water makes it much more unfavorable for the sodium stearate to give up its sodium ion so that it can form an insoluble compound and get rinsed away.

Instead, the stearate clings to the slightly charged surface of your skin. Essentially, soap would rather stick to you than get rinsed away in soft water.

We recommend using Potassium chloride rather than salt to eliminate that slippery-when wet feeling after rinsing the soap off. Also you're not adding salt to your drinking water.

During the softening process, sodium is released from the exchange media into the output water. For every grain of hardness removed from water,

8 mg/1 (ppm) of sodium is added. People on restricted sodium intake diets should account for increased levels of sodium in softened water. Your family physician should be consulted.

Sodium intake from softened water can be avoided by have a reverse osmosis kitchen tap drinking and cooking.

Substituting potassium chloride for sodium chloride may be appropriate if health or environmental reasons necessitate restricting sodium.

Potassium chloride is more expensive and adheres more strongly to the resin, reducing the exchange efficiency when compared with sodium chloride.

Salt is about $7 a bag Potassium is $30
I've never had a water softener so I'm wondering how long this potassium chloride lasts in the system? How often do you have to add more to the system?
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  #36  
Old 01-08-2019, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by New Englander View Post
I've never had a water softener so I'm wondering how long this potassium chloride lasts in the system? How often do you have to add more to the system?
Same amount of time/gallons as salt, some softeners (not ours) may require a programming change, the frequency to add depends on water use and the size of the resin bed.

Using potassium chloride may be appropriate if health or environmental reasons necessitate restricting sodium.

Potassium is an essential mineral for plants; whereas, sodium can damage plant tissues.
When the softener re-generates it creates waste water,
this diluted wastewater is beneficial to a shrubs, plants & grass covered drain field.

http://www.novafiltration.com/nova-water-softener/

.
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  #37  
Old 01-09-2019, 08:29 AM
New Englander New Englander is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimbo2012 View Post
Same amount of time/gallons as salt, some softeners (not ours) may require a programming change, the frequency to add depends on water use and the size of the resin bed.

Using potassium chloride may be appropriate if health or environmental reasons necessitate restricting sodium.

Potassium is an essential mineral for plants; whereas, sodium can damage plant tissues.
When the softener re-generates it creates waste water,
this diluted wastewater is beneficial to a shrubs, plants & grass covered drain field.

http://www.novafiltration.com/nova-water-softener/

.
How long would a bag of Potassium last? A week, month, six months?
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  #38  
Old 01-09-2019, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by New Englander View Post
How long would a bag of Potassium last? A week, month, six months?
As I said it depends how much water you use.

For example some homes use 1,500 Gallons a month some 4,000

On average the tank starts off with two bags that will last 4-5 months. 6-8 bags a year approximately

You're more than welcome to call with for detailed info if you wish
352.566.2649

Bob
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  #39  
Old 01-09-2019, 10:35 AM
cgilcreast cgilcreast is offline
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I use tap water unfiltered for everything. Just saying
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  #40  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:31 AM
TimeForChange TimeForChange is offline
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Been here seven years. Only water filter we have is on the refrigerator. Paying hundreds or even thousands for filter systems is a scam and a ripoff. My drinking water is mostly Pellegrino.
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