Drainage Concerns/Recommendations

Drainage Concerns/Recommendations

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Drainage Concerns/Recommendations
  #1  
Old 07-31-2019, 11:41 AM
Tjs Services Tjs Services is offline
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Default Drainage Concerns/Recommendations

A French Drain is a trench filled with gravel or rock or containing a perforated pipe that redirects surface water and groundwater away from an area. A French drain can have perforated hollow pipes along the bottom (see images) to quickly vent water that seeps down through the upper gravel or rock.

Why should you Install a French Drain? One of the best reasons for installing a French drain is if you have yard flooding problems or water infiltration to the low areas. Without doubts, a French drain is the most efficient and simple drainage system to deal with water or moisture surplus.Many issues are from the Gutters / Rain / Excess Irrigation water. If you are experiencing any soggy/wet ares that are constant problems Grass growth issues/Bugs and even simply getting mowed. If you are experiencing any issues like that we can Handle them for you.*By-Hand Digging Offered*
Have A Great Day

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352-229-7426
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  #2  
Old 07-31-2019, 12:16 PM
vintageogauge vintageogauge is offline
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You can also have it graded properly and install gutters with downspouts.
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  #3  
Old 08-05-2019, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by vintageogauge View Post
You can also have it graded properly and install gutters with downspouts.
exactly. however some homes are to close for major regrading. downspouts and gutters are more of a foundation ordeal due to the water still having no where to flow after coming off the roof.
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  #4  
Old 08-05-2019, 08:03 AM
justjim justjim is offline
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My neighbor tried to get the contractor (Developer) to pay for a French drain shortly after they moved into their new house but he refused. I guess he (contractor) figured my neighbor wouldn’t sue and he was right...
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  #5  
Old 08-05-2019, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by vintageogauge View Post
You can also have it graded properly...
No matter what else you consider, this is absolutely first and foremost.
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  #6  
Old 08-05-2019, 09:43 AM
Chellybean Chellybean is offline
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Originally Posted by justjim View Post
My neighbor tried to get the contractor (Developer) to pay for a French drain shortly after they moved into their new house but he refused. I guess he (contractor) figured my neighbor wouldn’t sue and he was right...
no matter what you folks think the Builder is responsible to properly grade the property. if it is under the first year warranty press the issue and fight for your rights.
Save your receipts if you have to do it yourself and then go to small claims court. it is the builders responsibility Period.
The landscapers grading the property do it by eye and never heard of a transit or leveler to sight in the grade! Its a joke and happens all the time!
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  #7  
Old 08-05-2019, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjs Services View Post
A French Drain is a trench filled with gravel or rock or containing a perforated pipe that redirects surface water and groundwater away from an area. A French drain can have perforated hollow pipes along the bottom (see images) to quickly vent water that seeps down through the upper gravel or rock.

Why should you Install a French Drain? One of the best reasons for installing a French drain is if you have yard flooding problems or water infiltration to the low areas. Without doubts, a French drain is the most efficient and simple drainage system to deal with water or moisture surplus.Many issues are from the Gutters / Rain / Excess Irrigation water. If you are experiencing any soggy/wet ares that are constant problems Grass growth issues/Bugs and even simply getting mowed. If you are experiencing any issues like that we can Handle them for you.*By-Hand Digging Offered*
Have A Great Day

Tjs Services Of Central Florida
352-229-7426
So I have a question. Our lot is graded correctly - and we have no problems near the house. The problem is between the houses in the depressed area (the one that is supposed to be there), and especially along the back 1/4 of the lot - the back corner never really dries out. There is some standing surface water, which does dry out in the dry season, but the soil stays wet. We have capped off the sprinkler heads in this area and that helped, but it is not solved. Wondering how you would do a french drain in the back of the property like this? Would you install a sump (like a 55 gallon drum) with gravel and some drain hose? Would you actually run a french drain all the way to the front of the property to the storm sewer? How do you approach a problem like this?
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  #8  
Old 08-05-2019, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Packer Fan View Post
So I have a question. Our lot is graded correctly - and we have no problems near the house. The problem is between the houses in the depressed area (the one that is supposed to be there), and especially along the back 1/4 of the lot - the back corner never really dries out. There is some standing surface water, which does dry out in the dry season, but the soil stays wet. We have capped off the sprinkler heads in this area and that helped, but it is not solved. Wondering how you would do a french drain in the back of the property like this? Would you install a sump (like a 55 gallon drum) with gravel and some drain hose? Would you actually run a french drain all the way to the front of the property to the storm sewer? How do you approach a problem like this?
The depressed area between the houses is supposed to be there, but the lots should be graded to slope toward the street. You may need to bring in some fill dirt to fill in the low area and regrade the lot to slope toward the street. If that won't work, then you may need to install an area drain and pipe it to the street with a pop up connection at the street end. I definitely would not install a sump pump in my yard.
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  #9  
Old 08-05-2019, 01:36 PM
Michael Charles Michael Charles is online now
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I contacted the warranty department about the same issue of a small stream running between the houses and was told they will only look at it if the water is still standing after 2 days of the last rainfall. It does just happen to dry out around the 2 day mark!
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  #10  
Old 09-06-2019, 08:43 AM
thelegges thelegges is offline
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Originally Posted by Michael Charles View Post
Of course they told me 2 days! Why else would I state that on a public forum? I only contacted the WARRANTY DEPARTMENT because we are still in the WARRANTY period.

Thanks for your input.
Actually our home is 9 years old, and I still contact the warranty dept. They have all the info on who worked on your home. We needed to match a broken outdoor light and gave us the contact numbers, the person to speak with, and a secondary company just in case.
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