Just finished reading "Liesureville"

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  #1  
Old 03-03-2011, 11:29 AM
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eweissenbach eweissenbach is offline
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Default Just finished reading "Liesureville"

It was mostly an interesting read, and not nearly as sensational as I had been led to believe by some. I think his contention that age segregation is troubling and pervasive is a bit flawed, and it is not as though it is a national obsession. He also seemed to contridict many of his own theorums throughout the book. What I found most disconcerting were his frequent profiles of alleged Villagers he encountered throughout his stay. I am not questioning his journalistic integrity, but I found most of those a bit outrageous, unbelievable, and stereotypical. His reported conversations and observations did not read like people talk, or act, in my world.

Glad I read it, and did help me understand the genesis of retirement communities in general, and TV in particular. His rather unflattering portrayal of the Morse clan and their dictatorship did not shock me, and in fact, was about what I had envisioned. The first morning of the first visit we made to TV I was sitting on the lanai and remarked to my wife that "it was nice of the Morses to have the bird chirping piped in for our enjoyment".

Actually, I am more ready to move to TV than I was before I read the book, whatever that says about me!
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  #2  
Old 03-03-2011, 11:37 AM
alemorkam alemorkam is offline
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That's how wonderful it is to live here. Do anything you want, or nothing if you want. The options are absolutely endless here. And I do mean all the options. It surely is a happy place. I am not single, but where in the world can single senior citizens enjoy life as much as I feel they do here. Just drive by Urban Flats and look at all the smiles.
  #3  
Old 03-03-2011, 01:36 PM
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Leisureviile has been shipped. I expect to get it within a few days.. Stay tuned for my review
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Old 03-22-2011, 09:33 PM
JeffBorn JeffBorn is offline
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I've read Leisureville a couple of months ago and found it more than mostly entertaining with some observations by the author in my opinion quite flawed and believe that a part of his view point was preconceived. He begins that his home is in a Norman Rockwellian New England town. I've visited Stockbridge MA and had a wonderful time in this tourist orieneted town with large homes and the quaint home of the Norman Rockwell museum. However it may be one of the last places I would describe as the cross section of American society which the author so forcefully feels must be preserved. There was not much diversity to be seen and it certainly was not representative of the lifestyle across the U.S. I would enjoy visiting a town meeting that presented an affordable housing development and see just how caring the community would find the proposal. It is a quaint small tourist oriented town. His assertions that TV is segregation in several forms is at best turning a blind eye to all communities age segregated or otherwise. Income ability plays a role in the make up of every community and enviable or not excludes those that can not attain what is required. In my opinion the Morse family had a vision and continues to carry it out very well to the benefit and satisfaction of those that share that vision. I've yet to find anything perfect but to begrudge a successful individual or generations of a family to enjoy the fruits of their labor is at best ludicrous. Pointing out the large white area that is Morse property in the middle of the map is ridiculous. They most likely could choose to live anywhere they desired but enjoy the center of their family's creation. The book has very colorful characters and I enjoyed the author's interesting observations and experiences. Although we do not share the same conclusions. Unfortunately in my opinion on the surface the up and coming generations view the aging demographic in our society with increasing less value. About to turn 60 it appears to me that authority is respected not necesarily age. That said I plan to read the book again.
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eweissenbach View Post
It was mostly an interesting read, and not nearly as sensational as I had been led to believe by some. I think his contention that age segregation is troubling and pervasive is a bit flawed, and it is not as though it is a national obsession. He also seemed to contridict many of his own theorums throughout the book. What I found most disconcerting were his frequent profiles of alleged Villagers he encountered throughout his stay. I am not questioning his journalistic integrity, but I found most of those a bit outrageous, unbelievable, and stereotypical. His reported conversations and observations did not read like people talk, or act, in my world.

Glad I read it, and did help me understand the genesis of retirement communities in general, and TV in particular. His rather unflattering portrayal of the Morse clan and their dictatorship did not shock me, and in fact, was about what I had envisioned. The first morning of the first visit we made to TV I was sitting on the lanai and remarked to my wife that "it was nice of the Morses to have the bird chirping piped in for our enjoyment".

Actually, I am more ready to move to TV than I was before I read the book, whatever that says about me!
I agree. His profile of alleged villagers had all the hallmarks of "typecasting" which no doubt they were. Real individuals, I don't think so.

He suggested that people who live in retirement communities were abandoning their families. He seemed to think that grandparents owe free baby-sitting service to their offsprings' brew. Yet, he expressed no similar outrage about people his own age moving-- along with said grandchildren-- to different cities from their parents.

He also expressed a more generalized outraged that retired people whose own kids had left the nest didn't want to dwell among other people's kids. That outrage struck me as immature, bratty and a wee bit hilarious, as I suspect he'll grow out of it.

His key message seemed to be: Imagine the nerve of retired people thinking they deserved a peaceful and rewarding life after working hard for so many years and raising a family. Selfish, he called us. Ironically I saw him as he saw us: selfish and entitled. Who knows. Maybe we all are.

On another note, the book was entertaining and an easy read and hopefully made him some money.
  #6  
Old 03-23-2011, 02:46 PM
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anything for a buck. I didn't believe in his logic, though I'll defend his right to express himself.
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Old 03-23-2011, 02:50 PM
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People are still spending money on that book?
  #8  
Old 03-24-2011, 02:24 PM
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People are still spending money on that book?
Well... I did spend 25 for a copy at a garage sale.
Worth every penny too! Who know that there were so many trashy women and sleazy men? I should have moved here sooner!
Actually, this guy just seems to resent that his neighbors (who he apparently wasn't even that friendly with) moved here and he had to get involved in his town's activities.
  #9  
Old 03-24-2011, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Pturner View Post
I agree. His profile of alleged villagers had all the hallmarks of "typecasting" which no doubt they were. Real individuals, I don't think so.

He suggested that people who live in retirement communities were abandoning their families. He seemed to think that grandparents owe free baby-sitting service to their offsprings' brew. Yet, he expressed no similar outrage about people his own age moving-- along with said grandchildren-- to different cities from their parents.

He also expressed a more generalized outraged that retired people whose own kids had left the nest didn't want to dwell among other people's kids. That outrage struck me as immature, bratty and a wee bit hilarious, as I suspect he'll grow out of it.

His key message seemed to be: Imagine the nerve of retired people thinking they deserved a peaceful and rewarding life after working hard for so many years and raising a family. Selfish, he called us. Ironically I saw him as he saw us: selfish and entitled. Who knows. Maybe we all are.

On another note, the book was entertaining and an easy read and hopefully made him some money.
PT - you summarized this perfectly. If, I may, one addition...


He never mentions that grandparents can still visit their grandchildren... or that TV has gone to a great deal of expense to provide many pools geared toward family visits. We were invited to Sun City (AZ) when my two were young - and they could only use 1 or 2 of the pools and for only an hour or 2 each day - yep - you guessed at high noon when any responsible parent would want to keep children away from the sun and glare in the desert.
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  #10  
Old 03-24-2011, 02:49 PM
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People are still spending money on that book?
Heck no, borrowed it from the library. No way was I going to help his cause or contribute to his bottom line.

I found the history of retirement communities interesting but his commentary contradictory.

On one hand he says that he had very little involvement with his neighbors other than a hand wave now and then but then had a fit when they chose to move. Guess he lost his free lawn mowing service.

Later in the book he whines about missing people his own age but yet criticizes retirement communities with age considerations. Gee, maybe the people who live there just want to be around people their own age also.

When you look at this guy's current demographics of being part of a very young family, it makes sense that his viewpoint is totally focused on where he is in life right now. Wants playgrounds, taxes for schools, etc.

I have to wonder if he will change his tune as his demographics change and he joins the 55 and older crowd.

Crow can be a very nasty tasting bird to have to eat.
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  #11  
Old 03-28-2011, 10:26 AM
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The author, Andrew Blechman, brought his own amoral biases to The Villages during his visit, and to the book in its writing. Why else would he choose to focus his time and effort to bring out the worst of this great community. He found what he was seeking and he revealed his character in his quest.
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  #12  
Old 03-28-2011, 11:03 AM
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Leisureviile has been shipped. I expect to get it within a few days.. Stay tuned for my review
I think, with all that's been stated...I will buy the book.
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