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  #31  
Old 10-18-2020, 10:40 AM
Harrison and Zuzana Harrison and Zuzana is offline
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I’ve owned Motorhomes for 40 years. Including 45’ tag axle pusher. I find that the smaller the better. If you are staying in one location for several days then moving, that is one thing. But, I find that we usually move most days.

Everyone works they way up to the bigger is better Motorhome. Then back to simple and enjoyable or quits due to it is to much work. We use our smaller Motorhome much like a suv. The work of having to look far ahead for fuel stations, places Big enough to be able to stop for lunch/dinner. You will have to tow a car. You can’t back up with tow car.
I’m love driving. And can drive anything comfortably.

We have a Winnebago nation diesel. 24’ diesel now. Traded in 45’ It enjoy it more. Can climb mountains, and park in most restaurants parking lots.
  #32  
Old 10-18-2020, 11:25 AM
John41 John41 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrison and Zuzana View Post
I’ve owned Motorhomes for 40 years. Including 45’ tag axle pusher. I find that the smaller the better. If you are staying in one location for several days then moving, that is one thing. But, I find that we usually move most days.

Everyone works they way up to the bigger is better Motorhome. Then back to simple and enjoyable or quits due to it is to much work. We use our smaller Motorhome much like a suv. The work of having to look far ahead for fuel stations, places Big enough to be able to stop for lunch/dinner. You will have to tow a car. You can’t back up with tow car.
I’m love driving. And can drive anything comfortably.

We have a Winnebago nation diesel. 24’ diesel now. Traded in 45’ It enjoy it more. Can climb mountains, and park in most restaurants parking lots.
Totally agree with you on the 24’ size and people trading down from very large units. Same thing happens with boats the longer a boat the more time it spends in the slip.

Last edited by John41; 10-18-2020 at 08:49 PM.
  #33  
Old 10-18-2020, 04:27 PM
John41 John41 is offline
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OP asked for pros and cons of diesel motor homes and here is a con from the
experts at Good Sam Roadside

GOOD SAM ROADSIDE DIESEL FUEL GELLING

Roadside Tips > Diesel Fuel Gelling: Motorhome Tips for Protecting Your Engine
Unlike the Dr. Scholls’ “Are You Gellin” commercials, in diesel fuel gelling is actually a bad thing.

Gelling is a process that begins as temperatures drop below 32 degrees Fahrenheit or zero degrees Celsius. This gelling affect is predetermined by the grade of diesel being utilized, and because there are numerous grades of diesel fuel there will inevitably be different freeze points and flash points. (Note: fuels vary from state to state dependent on climatic weather conditions; information can be found on the fuel pump or at your local fueling station service counter). Gelling occurs when diesel fuel reaches a certain temperature, and is not circulating properly, which causes the paraffin wax in the fuel to separate, and it is this wax that prevents the water in the fuel from forming ice crystals. Simply put, the paraffin wax separates and clogs the fuel filters.

It is common that different grades of diesel fuels will possess additives to help prevent the gelling process but cannot be guaranteed in extreme temperatures like 10 degrees and under. To manage a situation like this, do not shut the engine off and allow the fuel to circulate throughout a warm engine. However, once the gelling process has occurred and water crystals have formed it will consequentially lead to algae growth, which can promote numerous engine problems and be a continuous cause for fuel filter replacement.

A simple way to tell if the fuel has gelled is to take a flash light and shine it into the tank; it can be easily done as most diesel engines host a large opening and a shorter fuel neck. Another method is to look at the fuel filter which typically is a glass bowl with a clear bottom to easily monitor the amount of water in the fuel. The fuel will appear to be cloudy and often will produce small “islands” floating on top of the tank or in the fuel filter bowl.

There are a few preventative measures that can be implemented like purchasing additives at your local auto parts store, however be sure to follow the manufacturers’ specific requirements thoroughly. Some of these anti-gelling products contain combustibles such as kerosene, so it is critical to be aware of how much fuel you have and the grade of fuel being used. Electing the anti-gelling product will change the flash point of the fuel or the compression level to ignite the fuel in a safe and controlled manner. A few other good practices are to ensure the fuel filters are being replaced, the system is primed, and utilizing the same grade of fuel. Remember, the fuel must be circulated throughout the engine and restore the wax adherence to the water in the fuel which should only be done by a professional who can measure the quantity of fuel in the tanks and using the proper products to treat the condition.

Should an algae growth condition occur, be certain to have this treated at a service facility. The best approach in dealing with this issue is to have the motor home taken to a service facility where the fuel system can be thawed out, and so the fuel and tank can be both inspected and treated. The best course of action will be determined by the repair facility.

Brought to you by Sun RV ResortsSun RV Resorts

Last edited by John41; 10-18-2020 at 08:51 PM.
  #34  
Old 10-18-2020, 04:53 PM
vintageogauge vintageogauge is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsan View Post
May I ask what web site you used to sell your RVs?
I sold all of my RV's on eBay motors, well worth the small price, I believe it's $125.00 if it sells.
  #35  
Old 10-19-2020, 04:06 PM
Bill from NH Bill from NH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Butch View Post
We have a place in TV and are wanting to upgrade our motorhome to do some longer adventures. Any pros and cons in class A diesel pushers. We have a v10 Winnebago 36’ now but want to explore possible upgrades. Im familiar with the price differences. Looking for other pros and cons. Also anyone selling let us know!
We have a 42’ Beaver Contessa Class A. Call 603-387-5621 for info.
  #36  
Old 10-19-2020, 06:42 PM
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Nucky Nucky is online now
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I was out looking for either a Class C @31 ft and bigger or a small Class A with 2 or 3 bump-outs. My head is spinning. We looked at so many but am pretty sure we have it down to 3 finalists. I like the V8, not the V10 engines. I had a v10 in a Ford Excursion and didn't care for it. My son wants me to buy a 5th Wheel that has 4 bump outs but I'm not into towing a trailer that heavy anymore. Plus another $70k for a Pickup. I want to enjoy this not make a project out of it.

The Cold Weather additive for the Diesel is strictly optional. I had 30 Diesel Tractors on the road and let the driver decide. Of course, if they wanted the additive it came out of their money and few of them decided to use it unless it dropped into the high 20's. The other item that may be in question here is called DEF **Deisel Exhaust Fluid** The drivers call it Cow Urine. I cleaned that up. It is simple to add if your rig needs it but just another pain in the butt thing to remember. Units that run DEF are environmentally better but until the mechanics get a hold of the finer point of the difference between that newer kind of engine and a Deisel that's been around since forever it's a tough road when your engine has a problem.

We ended up buying Glider Kits and installing the engine and transmission of our choice to bypass all the electronics on those newer engines. I wouldn't want one if you gave it to me for free.

Last edited by Nucky; 10-19-2020 at 11:49 PM.
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