No Vinegar In AC Condensation Drain Lines

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  #1  
Old 03-10-2013, 08:39 PM
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Default No Vinegar In AC Condensation Drain Lines

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Last edited by KeepingItReal; 12-20-2013 at 11:10 PM. Reason: Add Link
  #2  
Old 03-10-2013, 08:43 PM
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Thanks, good info
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepingItReal View Post
A few days ago I noticed a mention of using vinegar to flush AC condensation drain lines and thought I had seen where this was not suggested anymore. Also our ac company said use only warm water too.

Found this in a previous thread relating to the copper line failures which explains why vinegar which has acid may be a problem. Extending the drain out away from the AC unit seems to be is a good idea also.

ALSO Do not under any circumstances use vinegar to flush the condensate line. The AC copper lines are enclosed in conduit along with the condensate line and IS NOT PROPERLY SEALED. After digging up 6 abandoned underground lines, we found them sealed with publix shopping bags, pepsi cans, roofing, and bubble wrap. I'm not kidding I have the pictures to prove this. The Vinegar is 5% acid and will seep down to the exit of the copper lines and copper and acid don't get along. DUH !
I actually suggest you extend the condensate line away from the compressor area. Other wise this area is constantly moist.

handie
J-Wharton@comcast.net

LINK TO THE FULL THREAD: POST is number 12

http://www.talkofthevillages.com/for...es-hvac-40136/
I assume this applies only to houses where the copper lines and condensate line are together in a conduit under the slab. Some houses have the copper lines run up the outside of the house and in through the attic and down into the air handler. This is the case in some instances where older units are replaced. The condensate line remains in the under slab conduit so any leakage would not effect working copper lines.

I believe there are other problems with running the copper lines through a conduit under the slab.
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:46 AM
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"All of the copper plumbing under the slab is encased in a continuous plastic sleeve as required by the Florida state building code."


COPPER PIPES PROS AND CONS all pro plumbing and drain cleaning


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  #5  
Old 03-11-2013, 06:57 AM
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I'm planning on flushing my AC condensor line as a semi-annual preventive maintainance chore...
I see the PVC output but where the heck is the input?
Where and how do you introduce the warm water to the drain.
We've never had central AC in our home as we're from the NE.
Thanks!
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Old 03-11-2013, 07:13 AM
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You should see a white pvc pipe near the front of the unit, with a plug in it that has 2 wires running to it. The plug is actually a safety switch that will shut the unit off if water is present to prevent flooding. The plug can be pulled out which gives you access to the drain line for flushing.
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  #7  
Old 03-11-2013, 07:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mulligan View Post
You should see a white pvc pipe near the front of the unit, with a plug in it that has 2 wires running to it. The plug is actually a safety switch that will shut the unit off if water is present to prevent flooding. The plug can be pulled out which gives you access to the drain line for flushing.
Additionally, there's a short stub of pipe which extends vertically that is near that switch - - at least that's the way the condensation drain on our place was plumbed. The stub pipe has a white PVC cap on it that's not glued on. Wiggle that cap off, get a small funnel, and I pour the warm water in through the drain pipe from that point.

Bill
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Old 03-11-2013, 08:50 AM
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Many thanks Mulligan and Bill for the info. I see exactly what you mean.
After running warm water through the line, do you think it would help to attach my wet vac to the output to purge it even more?
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Old 03-11-2013, 09:03 AM
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philnpat, you're welcome!

Personally, I wouldn't bother with the vacuum part......but that's just me. The line will have enough slope to it that it'll pretty much just drain naturally - gravity will do its job.

Also, as the O.P. mentioned, I extended the PVC pipe where the condensation drain terminates outside our house. As installed when the house was built, it stopped right between where the outdoor unit sits and the slab of the house (maybe 6" away from the slab)........and the turf did stay constantly wet there. After extending it, the drain pipe now runs out to the far side of the outdoor unit so it's about another 3' ft. beyond where it was before. Did it in such a way that the lawn mowing crew won't whack it while they're doing their job. Termites and other bugs like moisture so moving the drain line farther away from your slab is a good idea.

Bill
  #10  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill-n-Brillo View Post
philnpat, you're welcome!

Personally, I wouldn't bother with the vacuum part......but that's just me. The line will have enough slope to it that it'll pretty much just drain naturally - gravity will do its job.

Also, as the O.P. mentioned, I extended the PVC pipe where the condensation drain terminates outside our house. As installed when the house was built, it stopped right between where the outdoor unit sits and the slab of the house (maybe 6" away from the slab)........and the turf did stay constantly wet there. After extending it, the drain pipe now runs out to the far side of the outdoor unit so it's about another 3' ft. beyond where it was before. Did it in such a way that the lawn mowing crew won't whack it while they're doing their job. Termites and other bugs like moisture so moving the drain line farther away from your slab is a good idea.

Bill
Excellent tip. I'll do it!
  #11  
Old 03-11-2013, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepingItReal View Post
Quote: I assume this applies only to houses where the copper lines and condensate line are together in a conduit under the slab. Some houses have the copper lines run up the outside of the house and in through the attic and down into the air handler. This is the case in some instances where older units are replaced. The condensate line remains in the under slab conduit so any leakage would not effect working copper lines. I believe there are other problems with running the copper lines through a conduit under the slab.
************************************************** ************************************************** **********************************************
Probably so but even on those units with the copper lines up the wall the Sun Kool tech told us not to use vinegar to rinse out the drain line as it can also dissolve the glue in the pvc joints but I had never heard of that before. Have worked with a lot of PVC but never had an occasion to run vinegar through it before so I am not sure whether it possibly will or will not dissolve the glue in the joints. Acids in the concrete could also damage copper if it is in contact with it. [/QUOTE]

Those Sun Kool techs should get their information checked. A Sun Kool tech advised me to use vinegar. I think I will stick to soap and water.
  #12  
Old 03-11-2013, 05:35 PM
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I've talked to several techs in the past few years. It seems the newer guys say no vinegar or bleach down the pipes per new AC standards. The older guys say still put the vinegar down, but never bleach. Be sure to follow it up with 2 cups of hot water. So, guess the best way is to do what you're comfortable with. For now, I've gone the 1 cup hot water down the pipes and nothing else.
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  #13  
Old 03-12-2013, 08:26 PM
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We just had Munn's service our furnace and A/C and the technician also said to use warm/hot water to flush the lines - NO VINEGAR - He also advised to put a piece of plastic pipe to move the drain line away from the foundation.
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