Radon

Radon

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Radon
  #1  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:32 AM
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Robbie0723 Robbie0723 is online now
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Default Radon

Do homes ever test positive for radon in The Villages?

Anyone needed to install a mitigation system?
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  #2  
Old 08-14-2019, 09:20 AM
Bogie Shooter Bogie Shooter is offline
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Not an issue in Lake and Sumter County.

Map of Radon Zones in Florida based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data
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  #3  
Old 08-14-2019, 09:37 AM
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As I recall, you need a certain type of rock for radon, had the problem back up north, house was on the 'reading prong', had to install a mitigation system, this was after 3 years prior tests that were OK. Anyway, Florida appears to sit on a lot of limestone (sinkholes...) and sand, neither of which are a source of radon.
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  #4  
Old 08-14-2019, 10:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robbie0723 View Post
Do homes ever test positive for radon in The Villages? Anyone needed to install a mitigation system?
"Radon is produced by the radioactive decay of radium-226, which is found in uranium ores, phosphate rock, shales, igneous and metamorphic rocks such as granite, gneiss, and schist, and to a lesser degree, in common rocks such as limestone."

We sit on limestone here but I've never heard of radon being a problem.

However, I'm sure there are businesses that will try to sell you a mitigation system once they read your post!
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  #5  
Old 08-14-2019, 11:57 AM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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Radon gas is almost everywhere, but it is much more of a problem in houses that have a basement. The radon gas seeps through the basement floor and walls because it is under pressure in the soil much like water will seep through a crack in a swimming pool. The gas fills up the basement and then seeps into the living space through the floor. It is mitigated by venting the air in the basement to relieve the radon gas pressure. Single story houses with a slab-on-grade foundation are much less likely to have a radon gas problem.
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Old 08-14-2019, 12:10 PM
NotGolfer NotGolfer is offline
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Up north we were selling a house in the early 2000's...and the buyer wanted a mitagation study. Their "expert" told us we had to install a unit...which we did. BUT also told us that if we'd had a cover on our pit in the basement (forget what it's called) we'd not have had to do this. The pit was just there in the event anyone living in the house needed to buy a pump (we never needed one) could do so. The man said that the amount of radon coming up was minimal and that the people were concerned because they were moving in from out of state from an area that had a lot of radon showing up. I agree that there are businesses out to sell un-needed items such as this. We've never in all the moves we've made had to go through this except for that one time.
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Old 08-14-2019, 12:16 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NotGolfer View Post
Up north we were selling a house in the early 2000's...and the buyer wanted a mitagation study. Their "expert" told us we had to install a unit...which we did. BUT also told us that if we'd had a cover on our pit in the basement (forget what it's called) we'd not have had to do this. The pit was just there in the event anyone living in the house needed to buy a pump (we never needed one) could do so. The man said that the amount of radon coming up was minimal and that the people were concerned because they were moving in from out of state from an area that had a lot of radon showing up. I agree that there are businesses out to sell un-needed items such as this. We've never in all the moves we've made had to go through this except for that one time.
The sump pit is an opening where radon gas can enter the basement. In my Virginia neighborhood, all the sump pits had to be sealed shut to prevent radon gas from coming into the basement.
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  #8  
Old 08-14-2019, 01:51 PM
vintageogauge vintageogauge is online now
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Another scam that I don't believe in. You can check your basement once a week for a year and get a different reading every time. We sold a house once and the inspector set his testing equipment, came back and said it was "TOO LOW" so he re-set it and came back to find a reading that was borderline. the buyer wanted it mitigated and I refused, they accepted the house the way it was. The next time I sold a house I covered the sump pump and no problem. You spend more hours in the bedroom than in any other room in the house, why don't they test the bedroom? I think you know the answer. None of the government lending agencies require a radon test.
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Old 08-14-2019, 02:01 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is offline
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Originally Posted by vintageogauge View Post
Another scam that I don't believe in. You can check your basement once a week for a year and get a different reading every time. We sold a house once and the inspector set his testing equipment, came back and said it was "TOO LOW" so he re-set it and came back to find a reading that was borderline. the buyer wanted it mitigated and I refused, they accepted the house the way it was. The next time I sold a house I covered the sump pump and no problem. You spend more hours in the bedroom than in any other room in the house, why don't they test the bedroom? I think you know the answer. None of the government lending agencies require a radon test.
I tend to agree with you. But, the EPA claims that radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. and the National Cancer Institute claims that about 20,000 people die every year from lung cancer caused by radon gas. The potential problem is more likely as houses become better insulated and more leak proof. If your house has windows and doors that leak air, the house will not fill up with radon gas. Passive mitigation is very inexpensive, especially if it is designed into the house construction. You just install a plastic pipe from the basement sump to the exterior wall. If that doesn't work, then you need to install a fan in the pipe.
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  #10  
Old 08-14-2019, 09:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
I tend to agree with you. But, the EPA claims that radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. and the National Cancer Institute claims that about 20,000 people die every year from lung cancer caused by radon gas. The potential problem is more likely as houses become better insulated and more leak proof. If your house has windows and doors that leak air, the house will not fill up with radon gas. Passive mitigation is very inexpensive, especially if it is designed into the house construction. You just install a plastic pipe from the basement sump to the exterior wall. If that doesn't work, then you need to install a fan in the pipe.
Good summary, current methods essentially vacuum air from under the foundation and exhaust externally. Still a lot of controversy but $700 to mitigate a potential risk of lung cancer was worthwhile to me.

Here's a relatively balanced article illustrating the complexities.


Trump Wants the EPA Radon Program Cut. So Do Some Scientists | WIRED
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