Roundabout safety

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  #46  
Old 04-22-2011, 04:42 PM
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skyguy79 skyguy79 is offline
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Originally Posted by billethkid View Post
It is definetly the nut at the end of the steering wheel.

Makes one wonder where or why retired people have to be to go as fast as they do here in TV (or any where else).

btk
I hear what you're saying, but don't forget that not everyone who drives in and around TV are retired or even residents of TV. Your "nut at the end of the steering wheel" can come in a choice of domestic, imported and even commercial types!
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  #47  
Old 09-06-2011, 10:52 PM
Gil Chapin Gil Chapin is offline
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I've only lived here a year and a half so far, but it seems to me that the problem with the roundabouts is that if you're in the inside lane, you almost always have to cross the outside lane to get to an exit. I understand the business about choosing lanes according to where you're going to exit, but if you're going "straight through" in the outside lane and the guy who is in the inside lane is going straight through - but he got into the roundabout one entrance before you did, so he's getting off one exit before you - then he's going to cross in front of you - or into you - and you'll both think you were doing the right thing. If you're in a roundabout, you have the right of way over entering traffic. If you're in a particular lane (in a roundabout or otherwise), you have the right of way over another vehicle entering that lane (and by the way, entering a roundabout's left lane from the entrance's left lane means you cross the outside lane of the roundabout...). Still further, if a vehicle is in a lane in a roundabout, it can stay there all day long and go around and around and retain the right of way unless and until it changes lanes. So from a practical perspective, it seems to me that the vehicle in the outside lane usually has the right of way. People in the inside lane must assume that the vehicle in the outside lane is NOT getting off at the same exit as they are and yield to that vehicle.

I do use the inside lane for going to the third exit - and sometimes even to the second exit - but I'm acutely aware of the traffic in the outside lane that may be going to a different exit beyond mine.

When I'm in the outside lane in a roundabout, I'm always looking over my left shoulder for that person who thinks he has the right of way to cross in front of me just because he thinks he's on the "main" road.

The other thing I've seen mentioned here is signalling one's intentions. I thought cars sold in Florida didn't have turn signals because no one would use them anyway. Where I came from, you are obliged by law to signal your intentions when changing lanes or making turns. That is, your intentions - it doesn't work if you only start to signal while you maneuver and it certainly doesn't work if you don't do it at all. It seems especially important to use them in roundabouts - but it's a requirement of the vehicle and traffic law no matter where you're driving - even if you have a turning lane and/or a green arrow - or if you're selecting the bypass lane for a roundabout.

And as long as I'm on a soapbox, another irritating thing I see frequently is people's apparent lack of understanding about "right turn on red" situations. Many people seem to overlook the stop portion of that maneuver. Full stop, that is, not just a hesitation. Just because they didn't see anyone coming doesn't absolve them of the requirement to come to a full stop (meaning no forward motion) before turning.

All right, the last thing is people who turn left from the inside lane into the outside lane of the intersecting street (and probably doing it without signalling too...). You're obliged to turn into the corresponding adjacent lane. If you're in the inside lane before the intersection, you should be in the inside lane after turning through the intersection. If you have to be in the outside lane after turning from the inside lane, then after you've made the turn at the intersection into the adjacent lane, signal for the lane change and yield to traffic in that lane before you change into it.

This stuff isn't rocket science... most of if is just understanding and obeying the existing traffic laws.

I guess I should change my login name to "Mr. Pompous-Know-It-All-Who-Does-He-Think-He-Is-Anyway", shouldn't I?
  #48  
Old 09-07-2011, 06:56 AM
Bogie Shooter Bogie Shooter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil Chapin View Post
I've only lived here a year and a half so far, but it seems to me that the problem with the roundabouts is that if you're in the inside lane, you almost always have to cross the outside lane to get to an exit. I understand the business about choosing lanes according to where you're going to exit, but if you're going "straight through" in the outside lane and the guy who is in the inside lane is going straight through - but he got into the roundabout one entrance before you did, so he's getting off one exit before you - then he's going to cross in front of you - or into you - and you'll both think you were doing the right thing. If you're in a roundabout, you have the right of way over entering traffic. If you're in a particular lane (in a roundabout or otherwise), you have the right of way over another vehicle entering that lane (and by the way, entering a roundabout's left lane from the entrance's left lane means you cross the outside lane of the roundabout...). Still further, if a vehicle is in a lane in a roundabout, it can stay there all day long and go around and around and retain the right of way unless and until it changes lanes. So from a practical perspective, it seems to me that the vehicle in the outside lane usually has the right of way. People in the inside lane must assume that the vehicle in the outside lane is NOT getting off at the same exit as they are and yield to that vehicle.

I do use the inside lane for going to the third exit - and sometimes even to the second exit - but I'm acutely aware of the traffic in the outside lane that may be going to a different exit beyond mine.

When I'm in the outside lane in a roundabout, I'm always looking over my left shoulder for that person who thinks he has the right of way to cross in front of me just because he thinks he's on the "main" road.

The other thing I've seen mentioned here is signalling one's intentions. I thought cars sold in Florida didn't have turn signals because no one would use them anyway. Where I came from, you are obliged by law to signal your intentions when changing lanes or making turns. That is, your intentions - it doesn't work if you only start to signal while you maneuver and it certainly doesn't work if you don't do it at all. It seems especially important to use them in roundabouts - but it's a requirement of the vehicle and traffic law no matter where you're driving - even if you have a turning lane and/or a green arrow - or if you're selecting the bypass lane for a roundabout.

And as long as I'm on a soapbox, another irritating thing I see frequently is people's apparent lack of understanding about "right turn on red" situations. Many people seem to overlook the stop portion of that maneuver. Full stop, that is, not just a hesitation. Just because they didn't see anyone coming doesn't absolve them of the requirement to come to a full stop (meaning no forward motion) before turning.

All right, the last thing is people who turn left from the inside lane into the outside lane of the intersecting street (and probably doing it without signalling too...). You're obliged to turn into the corresponding adjacent lane. If you're in the inside lane before the intersection, you should be in the inside lane after turning through the intersection. If you have to be in the outside lane after turning from the inside lane, then after you've made the turn at the intersection into the adjacent lane, signal for the lane change and yield to traffic in that lane before you change into it.

This stuff isn't rocket science... most of if is just understanding and obeying the existing traffic laws.

I guess I should change my login name to "Mr. Pompous-Know-It-All-Who-Does-He-Think-He-Is-Anyway", shouldn't I?
Yes. In answer to your question.
A new thread would be good, that way there could be and additional 50 plus opinions stated. LOL. However, the roundabouts are here to stay, the idiots will be driving in them,so go slow and enjoy the day.

Last edited by Bogie Shooter; 09-07-2011 at 07:00 AM. Reason: error
  #49  
Old 09-07-2011, 09:21 AM
downeaster downeaster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil Chapin View Post
I've only lived here a year and a half so far, but it seems to me that the problem with the roundabouts is that if you're in the inside lane, you almost always have to cross the outside lane to get to an exit. I understand the business about choosing lanes according to where you're going to exit, but if you're going "straight through" in the outside lane and the guy who is in the inside lane is going straight through - but he got into the roundabout one entrance before you did, so he's getting off one exit before you - then he's going to cross in front of you - or into you - and you'll both think you were doing the right thing. If you're in a roundabout, you have the right of way over entering traffic. If you're in a particular lane (in a roundabout or otherwise), you have the right of way over another vehicle entering that lane (and by the way, entering a roundabout's left lane from the entrance's left lane means you cross the outside lane of the roundabout...). Still further, if a vehicle is in a lane in a roundabout, it can stay there all day long and go around and around and retain the right of way unless and until it changes lanes. So from a practical perspective, it seems to me that the vehicle in the outside lane usually has the right of way. People in the inside lane must assume that the vehicle in the outside lane is NOT getting off at the same exit as they are and yield to that vehicle.

I do use the inside lane for going to the third exit - and sometimes even to the second exit - but I'm acutely aware of the traffic in the outside lane that may be going to a different exit beyond mine.

When I'm in the outside lane in a roundabout, I'm always looking over my left shoulder for that person who thinks he has the right of way to cross in front of me just because he thinks he's on the "main" road.

The other thing I've seen mentioned here is signalling one's intentions. I thought cars sold in Florida didn't have turn signals because no one would use them anyway. Where I came from, you are obliged by law to signal your intentions when changing lanes or making turns. That is, your intentions - it doesn't work if you only start to signal while you maneuver and it certainly doesn't work if you don't do it at all. It seems especially important to use them in roundabouts - but it's a requirement of the vehicle and traffic law no matter where you're driving - even if you have a turning lane and/or a green arrow - or if you're selecting the bypass lane for a roundabout.

And as long as I'm on a soapbox, another irritating thing I see frequently is people's apparent lack of understanding about "right turn on red" situations. Many people seem to overlook the stop portion of that maneuver. Full stop, that is, not just a hesitation. Just because they didn't see anyone coming doesn't absolve them of the requirement to come to a full stop (meaning no forward motion) before turning.

All right, the last thing is people who turn left from the inside lane into the outside lane of the intersecting street (and probably doing it without signalling too...). You're obliged to turn into the corresponding adjacent lane. If you're in the inside lane before the intersection, you should be in the inside lane after turning through the intersection. If you have to be in the outside lane after turning from the inside lane, then after you've made the turn at the intersection into the adjacent lane, signal for the lane change and yield to traffic in that lane before you change into it.

This stuff isn't rocket science... most of if is just understanding and obeying the existing traffic laws.

I guess I should change my login name to "Mr. Pompous-Know-It-All-Who-Does-He-Think-He-Is-Anyway", shouldn't I?
Gil, please clarify inside/outside. Is "inside" left lane and "outside" right lane?
  #50  
Old 09-07-2011, 09:49 AM
NJblue NJblue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil Chapin View Post
I've only lived here a year and a half so far, but it seems to me that the problem with the roundabouts is that if you're in the inside lane, you almost always have to cross the outside lane to get to an exit. I understand the business about choosing lanes according to where you're going to exit, but if you're going "straight through" in the outside lane and the guy who is in the inside lane is going straight through - but he got into the roundabout one entrance before you did, so he's getting off one exit before you - then he's going to cross in front of you - or into you - and you'll both think you were doing the right thing. If you're in a roundabout, you have the right of way over entering traffic. If you're in a particular lane (in a roundabout or otherwise), you have the right of way over another vehicle entering that lane (and by the way, entering a roundabout's left lane from the entrance's left lane means you cross the outside lane of the roundabout...). Still further, if a vehicle is in a lane in a roundabout, it can stay there all day long and go around and around and retain the right of way unless and until it changes lanes. So from a practical perspective, it seems to me that the vehicle in the outside lane usually has the right of way. People in the inside lane must assume that the vehicle in the outside lane is NOT getting off at the same exit as they are and yield to that vehicle.
This is not correct. A person entering the roundabout in the outer lane must either take the first (a "right" turn) or second exit (go straight on the original road). To proceed beyond the second exit puts him in violation of the roundabout rules. People who do this have been the cause of every one of my near misses in roundabouts.
  #51  
Old 09-07-2011, 09:59 AM
Bogie Shooter Bogie Shooter is offline
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Looks pretty simple to me.
http://www.districtgov.org/PdfView/PdfView.aspx?path='/PdfUpload/RoundaboutBrochure[/url] - FINAL070908.pdf'&ql=standard
  #52  
Old 09-07-2011, 10:41 AM
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This thread is loaded with misinformation. A lot of people seem to have their own version of the rules. Using terms like "inside" and "outside" in reference to lanes is also confusing.

To clear up any confusion look back to Bogie Shooter's post (#51) and go to the site he references. Or stop by the Sheriff's location on CR466 and pick up a copy of the brochure.

In fact, l2ridehd's post (#2) summarizes the rules very clearly.
  #53  
Old 09-07-2011, 11:52 AM
Bogie Shooter Bogie Shooter is offline
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Originally Posted by downeaster View Post
This thread is loaded with misinformation. A lot of people seem to have their own version of the rules. Using terms like "inside" and "outside" in reference to lanes is also confusing.

To clear up any confusion look back to Bogie Shooter's post (#51) and go to the site he references. Or stop by the Sheriff's location on CR466 and pick up a copy of the brochure.

In fact, l2ridehd's post (#2) summarizes the rules very clearly.
You are right. This thread and the other 4-5 threads on this subject are filled with "i think", "IMHO" and only a few address the published rules in the handbook. In fact if everyone followed the rules............
  #54  
Old 09-07-2011, 12:08 PM
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I don't think that using "inside" or "outside" is ambiguous. However, there seems to be a continuing notion that people in the right/outside lanes have the right to continue going around the circle to exit at any point that they wish. I just narrowly avoided such a person 20 minutes ago. If this notion could be quashed, navigating the circles would be a piece of cake.
  #55  
Old 09-07-2011, 12:22 PM
Bogie Shooter Bogie Shooter is offline
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Originally Posted by NJblue View Post
I don't think that using "inside" or "outside" is ambiguous. However, there seems to be a continuing notion that people in the right/outside lanes have the right to continue going around the circle to exit at any point that they wish. I just narrowly avoided such a person 20 minutes ago. If this notion could be quashed, navigating the circles would be a piece of cake.
How did he get so close to you or how did you get so close to him?
  #56  
Old 09-07-2011, 12:39 PM
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The same way that most of these close calls occur: We were both going south on BV. He entered the circle a little ahead of me in the right lane. I entered behind him in the left lane and intended to go straight. Rather than turn right or go straight, he continued around the circle thus cutting in front of my path. Fortunately, I've seen enough of this to be ready to hit the brakes as he cut in front of me.
  #57  
Old 09-07-2011, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJblue View Post
I don't think that using "inside" or "outside" is ambiguous. However, there seems to be a continuing notion that people in the right/outside lanes have the right to continue going around the circle to exit at any point that they wish. I just narrowly avoided such a person 20 minutes ago. If this notion could be quashed, navigating the circles would be a piece of cake.
I don't see what the problem was unless you were on the inside lane and attempted to exit from the inside lane. I usually stay in the outside lane and are especially careful of those who want exit from the inside lane where you can get cut off.

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  #58  
Old 09-07-2011, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by jrheydt View Post
I don't see what the problem was unless you were on the inside lane and attempted to exit from the inside lane. I usually stay in the outside lane and are especially careful of those who want exit from the inside lane where you can get cut off.

John
If you look at the proscribed traffic flow, when you enter the circle from the left lane, you are supposed to go into the inside lane of the circle. Once there, you are supposed to stay on the inside until you exit - thus causing you to cross the "outer" lane. This is not a problem as long as those in the right lane do as they are supposed to do - either turn right at the first exit or go straight by taking the second exit. The problem occurs when the person in the right lane wants to continue around the circle thus interfering with ability of the those in the inner lane to exit.
  #59  
Old 09-07-2011, 12:57 PM
downeaster downeaster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJblue View Post
I don't think that using "inside" or "outside" is ambiguous. However, there seems to be a continuing notion that people in the right/outside lanes have the right to continue going around the circle to exit at any point that they wish. I just narrowly avoided such a person 20 minutes ago. If this notion could be quashed, navigating the circles would be a piece of cake.
Here is where it can be confusing. Driving on BV the right lane is the "inside" lane and left lane is the "outside" lane. As soon as you enter a roundabout the right lane is often considered the "outside" lane and left lane the "inside" lane.
My point is, some of us don't know in from out but most of us know right from left.
  #60  
Old 09-07-2011, 01:07 PM
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OK, now I think I see the confusion. My point of reference for the inside/outside was and is the circle in which case there is no ambiguity about the inside versus outside of a circle.
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