Steel studs

Steel studs

Notices

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 08-08-2019, 07:39 PM
M2inOR M2inOR is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
In my opinion, steel studs and wood studs both provide equilvalent construction quality. They are probably using wood studs in The Lofts because it is a multi-story building and some of the interior walls will be loadbearing. Steel studs are more appropriate for single level buildings, like almost every house in The Villages.
Just an FYI:

Out here in Oregon, they are building new 5 story apartment buildings and condos that are all wood stud construction. I was quite surprised, expecting steel or concrete for strength.

For our Villages home search, we are limiting our search to stucco/concrete following recommendations of family members who live there, and experiences with vinyl siding elsewhere.

My 40 year old home in Oregon has cedar siding. There have been few issues, as long as exterior paint is done well. We don't seem to have termite problems here.

As for steel studs, the Class A office tilt up buildings and warehouses here use steel studs for the build-out within the buildings. Almost all home construction here is wood studs inside and out.

I'm interested in any issues with Villages homes constructed 10-15 years ago, and what to look out for when considering a purchase. I'm looking at homes between 466 and 466A.

Thanks in advance.

Mike
Reply With Quote

  #42  
Old 08-09-2019, 02:31 AM
Midnight Cowgirl Midnight Cowgirl is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 381
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by biker1 View Post
The less wood the better. They don't eat concrete.

You are no better off in a block/concrete house than any other type of built house.

The termites will find their way in through cracks in the foundation and exterior walls as well as those tiny cracks around windows and doors. And don't kid yourself; all houses have them!


And if they don't find a good meal in the walls, then moldings, trim and even your furniture will work just fine for them.

Your comment suggests you are better off in a concrete-type house. Not so! It just doesn't matter.
__________________
My purpose in life does not include a hankering to charm society
. . . . . James Dean
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #43  
Old 08-09-2019, 06:00 AM
biker1 biker1 is offline
Platinum member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,772
Default

Wrong. The less wood, the less possible sites for an infestation. This is not a statement about reduced probabilities. It is a statement about reduced opportunities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Midnight Cowgirl View Post
You are no better off in a block/concrete house than any other type of built house.

The termites will find their way in through cracks in the foundation and exterior walls as well as those tiny cracks around windows and doors. And don't kid yourself; all houses have them!


And if they don't find a good meal in the walls, then moldings, trim and even your furniture will work just fine for them.

Your comment suggests you are better off in a concrete-type house. Not so! It just doesn't matter.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 08-09-2019, 07:14 AM
biker1 biker1 is offline
Platinum member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,772
Default

Sigh ... Go back and reread your own post. You used the term "quality". The only real quality issues are strength and trueness. Whatever - two years olds and know-it-alls ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Midnight Cowgirl View Post
If you are going to quote me, correct me, and say I am trying to "create an issue," please do it properly.

Comment on what I've actually said and not some bogus words which you made up.

I said nothing about loading or non-loading walls, I said nothing about walls being straight and furthermore, it would appear that you are the one creating an issue judging by your erroneous comment.

Last edited by biker1; 08-09-2019 at 07:17 AM. Reason: quality
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 08-09-2019, 01:22 PM
graciegirl's Avatar
graciegirl graciegirl is online now
Sage
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: From Ohio, now happily live in Laurel Valley
Posts: 36,211
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Midnight Cowgirl View Post
You are no better off in a block/concrete house than any other type of built house.

The termites will find their way in through cracks in the foundation and exterior walls as well as those tiny cracks around windows and doors. And don't kid yourself; all houses have them!


And if they don't find a good meal in the walls, then moldings, trim and even your furniture will work just fine for them.

Your comment suggests you are better off in a concrete-type house. Not so! It just doesn't matter.
Do you have a termite killer service?
__________________
I have to be myself, everyone else is taken.
Reply With Quote
No shortage of misinformation
  #46  
Old 08-13-2019, 11:57 AM
DAVES DAVES is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 97
Default No shortage of misinformation

Our previous home was up north and was built in 1948. Not only do they not build them like they used to, you simply cannot build them like they used to. We speak about 2x4 construction lumber.
First of all what you buy that has been processed. planed, is actually smaller than it used to be. Today it is grown on farms.
Due to the faster growth rate the same wood type is actually softer and weaker.
In our older home the roof underpayment was all tongue and grooved fir. Fir is more termite resistant unlike the glued together scraps they they now use there is no glue to fail.
As to brass valves. I had a summer job making faucets. Translation, I knew nothing about being a machinist, I was cheap labor. That summer I made about a million valve stems out of monel-expensive, tough on tools, stainless steel. I asked why people would spend so much on water valves. The reply was the water down south is so bad it destroys brass valves.
Our waste lines were cast iron. Our modern steel making does not make any real cast iron. When you read about cast iron pipe failing, it is not usually cast iron, which is virtually rust proof, it is mild steel which does rust.
To the point-our old home was, most of it 71 years old. Will your modern home last that long? Your plastic plumbing etc-NOPE.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 08-13-2019, 12:32 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is online now
Soaring Eagle member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 2,318
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DAVES View Post
Our previous home was up north and was built in 1948. Not only do they not build them like they used to, you simply cannot build them like they used to. We speak about 2x4 construction lumber.
First of all what you buy that has been processed. planed, is actually smaller than it used to be. Today it is grown on farms.
Due to the faster growth rate the same wood type is actually softer and weaker.
In our older home the roof underpayment was all tongue and grooved fir. Fir is more termite resistant unlike the glued together scraps they they now use there is no glue to fail.
As to brass valves. I had a summer job making faucets. Translation, I knew nothing about being a machinist, I was cheap labor. That summer I made about a million valve stems out of monel-expensive, tough on tools, stainless steel. I asked why people would spend so much on water valves. The reply was the water down south is so bad it destroys brass valves.
Our waste lines were cast iron. Our modern steel making does not make any real cast iron. When you read about cast iron pipe failing, it is not usually cast iron, which is virtually rust proof, it is mild steel which does rust.
To the point-our old home was, most of it 71 years old. Will your modern home last that long? Your plastic plumbing etc-NOPE.
Like most things today, the construction industry is driven by the market and competition. Most people are very naive about what materials are good or bad to have in their house. They are mostly looking at cosmetic features and the cost per square footage. To me, the steel studs are fine, but the most obvious deficiencies in new house construction is cheap windows and doors, and those plastic push-pull shut off valves at the plumbing fixtures. The builder should upgrade the valves.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:45 PM.