"Age Associated Financial Vulnerability" - The Scamming of Seniors

"Age Associated Financial Vulnerability" - The Scamming of Seniors

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  #11  
Old 06-04-2019, 08:10 PM
Jazuela Jazuela is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdNoMore View Post
No children that you know about.


Oh wait, that only applies...to us guys.
Hah! Grandpa is that YOU???
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  #12  
Old 06-05-2019, 09:13 AM
Boomer Boomer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
I'm not criticizing, but, when I read about some of the outrageous scams like these, it makes me wonder that, if I ever get to the point where I would fall for them, what difference does it make? I may as well just lose my money. But, your advice to just hang up the phone seems ridiculously inadequate. Is someone who would buy hundreds of gift cards and give them to a stranger really going to take your advice to just hang up the phone?


Hi retiredguy,
You are right about my advice to not answer or hang up as being inadequate — though ‘woefully’ inadequate might have been a better phrase. But, that’s OK. I knew what you meant.
- - - - -
There is a lot to this brain science thing discussed in the link I added to my earlier post. What is really scary is that writing off the susceptibility to being scammed as a sign of dementia is to dismiss much of what is happening with the ever growing onslaught of scams. Many, many of those scammed are highly functioning seniors with no signs of dementia.

I have read other articles about the hijacking of the amygdala, a part of the brain that has to do with our emotions.

The goal of a scammer is to get a grip on the amygdala to elicit an emotional response: Must act immediately! Get a deal! Rescue someone! Rescue your computer from having been hacked! Fear! Paranoia! Anger! Romance!

Maybe advice should include to be aware of quick, new, emotional responses, slam on the brakes, and let critical thinking skills kick in.

Another aspect of scamming potential — those cruel in-person scams. One night at LSL, I observed a young woman chatting up a much older gentleman while in line. They were obviously strangers to each other. She was so persistent in trying to connect with him. Something about it was making the hair on the back of my neck stand up. I continued to observe as the line moved along. But I then realized he was suspicious of her motives, too. Good for him! I did not have to rescue him.

Last edited by Boomer; 06-05-2019 at 09:20 AM.
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2019, 03:16 PM
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BobnBev BobnBev is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer View Post
Hi retiredguy,
You are right about my advice to not answer or hang up as being inadequate — though ‘woefully’ inadequate might have been a better phrase. But, that’s OK. I knew what you meant.
- - - - -
There is a lot to this brain science thing discussed in the link I added to my earlier post. What is really scary is that writing off the susceptibility to being scammed as a sign of dementia is to dismiss much of what is happening with the ever growing onslaught of scams. Many, many of those scammed are highly functioning seniors with no signs of dementia.

I have read other articles about the hijacking of the amygdala, a part of the brain that has to do with our emotions.

The goal of a scammer is to get a grip on the amygdala to elicit an emotional response: Must act immediately! Get a deal! Rescue someone! Rescue your computer from having been hacked! Fear! Paranoia! Anger! Romance!

Maybe advice should include to be aware of quick, new, emotional responses, slam on the brakes, and let critical thinking skills kick in.

Another aspect of scamming potential — those cruel in-person scams. One night at LSL, I observed a young woman chatting up a much older gentleman while in line. They were obviously strangers to each other. She was so persistent in trying to connect with him. Something about it was making the hair on the back of my neck stand up. I continued to observe as the line moved along. But I then realized he was suspicious of her motives, too. Good for him! I did not have to rescue him.
I was there! I saw her also.
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  #14  
Old 06-05-2019, 03:31 PM
Carla B Carla B is offline
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I sometimes pick up and disconnect quickly. Now you all are saying the computer at the caller's end of the line registers our number for future use. But what about the advice to simply not answer? What good does that do since the call goes to voice mail. The computer would still detect that it's a "live" number, wouldn't it?
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  #15  
Old 06-13-2019, 10:14 AM
PennBF PennBF is offline
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There are 2 scams which I just noticed and are probably aimed at Seniors. The first is if you see a $1.00 charge on your credit card. It may be to test to see if you are watching you credit bills and if not you may start to see strange higher billings for other services and the $1.00 will be a scam as a subscription to something and you will receive charges in the future for this not approved for a subscription to something. Call the company and cancel immediately. The second is uploading. You are subscribing to a service and out of the blue you are seeing new charges on your bill for that service but higher charges for add ons you never wanted or specifically agreed to. Another is to add new subscriptions to your charge accounts under the same general name but new company names added to the basic to tie in to the original basic name. NET: Keep a close eye on any charges to you credit card account.
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seniors, scams, people, hold, wealth

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