This day in US Military History-- December 25.

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  #31  
Old 01-22-2020, 08:54 AM
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January 22 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Allied landings at Anzio began on this day in 1944. Battle of Anzio | World War II Database
  #32  
Old 01-23-2020, 01:43 PM
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Default "Father of Modern Weapons" John Moses Browning born in 1855.

He has had quite the impact on warfare, hunting, and home defense in many countries.

Quote:
1855 –John Moses Browning, sometimes referred to as the “father of modern firearms,” is born in Ogden, Utah. Many of the guns manufactured by companies whose names evoke the history of the American West-Winchester, Colt, Remington, and Savage-were actually based on John Browning’s designs. The son of a talented gunsmith, John Browning began experimenting with his own gun designs as a young man. When he was 24 years old, he received his first patent, for a rifle that Winchester manufactured as its Single Shot Model 1885. Impressed by the young man’s inventiveness, Winchester asked Browning if he could design a lever-action-repeating shotgun. Browning could and did, but his efforts convinced him that a pump-action mechanism would work better, and he patented his first pump model shotgun in 1888. Fundamentally, all of Browning’s manually-operated repeating rifle and shotgun designs were aimed at improving one thing: the speed and reliability with which gun users could fire multiple rounds-whether shooting at game birds or other people. Lever and pump actions allowed the operator to fire a round, operate the lever or pump to quickly eject the spent shell, insert a new cartridge, and then fire again in seconds. By the late 1880s, Browning had perfected the manual repeating weapon; to make guns that fired any faster, he would somehow have to eliminate the need for slow human beings to actually work the mechanisms. But what force could replace that of the operator moving a lever or pump? Browning discovered the answer during a local shooting competition when he noticed that reeds between a man firing and his target were violently blown aside by gases escaping from the gun muzzle. He decided to try using the force of that escaping gas to automatically work the repeating mechanism. Browning began experimenting with his idea in 1889. Three years later, he received a patent for the first crude fully automatic weapon that captured the gases at the muzzle and used them to power a mechanism that automatically reloaded the next bullet. In subsequent years, Browning refined his automatic weapon design. When U.S. soldiers went to Europe during WWI, many of them carried Browning Automatic Rifles, as well as Browning’s deadly machine guns. During a career spanning more than five decades, Browning’s guns went from being the classic weapons of the American West to deadly tools of world war carnage. Amazingly, since Browning’s death in 1926, there have been no further fundamental changes in the modern firearm industry.
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:54 PM
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January 24 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Robert Murray Hanson awarded Congressional Medal of Honor for actions before and on this day. Robert M. Hanson - Wikipedia

Quote:
First Lieutenant Hanson arrived in the South Pacific in June 1943 and his daring tactics and total disregard for death soon became well known. A master of individual air combat, he downed 20 enemy planes in six consecutive flying days. He was commended in the citation accompanying the Medal of Honor for his bold attack against six enemy torpedo bombers, November 1, 1943, over Bougainville Island, and for bringing down four Zeros, the premier Japanese fighter, while fighting them alone over New Britain, January 24, 1944.
  #34  
Old 01-25-2020, 12:25 PM
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January 25 | This Day in U.S. Military History

For actions this day in 2008 in Afghanistan, Robert J. Miller was awarded a Congressional Medal on Honor posthumously.

Presidential Remarks for Staff Sergeant Robert J. Miller - Medal of Honor Recipient
  #35  
Old 01-26-2020, 03:23 PM
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January 26 | This Day in U.S. Military History


Douglas MacArthur born in 1880 on this day. Who Is MacArthur? | MacArthur Memorial, VA - Official Website
  #36  
Old 01-27-2020, 09:49 AM
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January 27 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Apollo 1 disaster occurred on this date in 1967.

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1967 – A launch pad fire during Apollo program tests at Cape Canaveral, Florida, kills astronauts Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Edward H. White II, and Roger B. Chafee. An investigation indicated that a faulty electrical wire inside the Apollo 1 command module was the probable cause of the fire. The astronauts, the first Americans to die in a spacecraft, had been participating in a simulation of the Apollo 1 launch scheduled for the next month. The Apollo program was initiated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) following President John F. Kennedy’s 1961 declaration of the goal of landing men on the moon and bringing them safely back to Earth by the end of the decade. The so-called “moon shot” was the largest scientific and technological undertaking in history. In December 1968, Apollo 8 was the first manned spacecraft to travel to the moon, and on July 20, 1969, astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. walked on the lunar surface. In all, there were 17 Apollo missions and six lunar landings.
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Old 01-28-2020, 11:05 PM
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Unhappy Space Shuttle Challenger disaster January 28, 1986.

Space Shuttle Challenger disaster - Wikipedia

I remember the shock my fellow employees at Information Access company in Belmont, CA felt for this tragedy. Some of us would be indexing articles in various newspapers for our various products which were in many public, law and university libraries in the United States.
  #38  
Old 01-31-2020, 01:02 PM
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January 31 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Private Slovik executed for desertion in WWII on this day in 1945.

The execution of Pvt. Slovik - HISTORY
  #39  
Old 02-01-2020, 11:21 PM
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February 1 | This Day in U.S. Military History

The Battle Hymn of the Republic first published on this day in 1862.

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1862 – “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” was first published in “Atlantic Monthly” as an anonymous poem. The lyric was the work of Julia Ward Howe and was based on chapter 63 of the Old Testament’s Book of Isaiah. “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” soon became the most popular Union marching song of the Civil War and is still being sung and to the tune of a song titled, “John Brown’s Body”. Julia Ward Howe (b.1819-1908) was an influential social reformer and wife of fellow reformer and educator Samuel Gridley Howe. She was prominent in the anti-slavery movement, woman‘s suffrage, prison reform and the international peace movements. Julia Ward Howe was the first woman elected to the American Academy of Fine Arts and Letters in 1908. Ralph Waldo Emerson, said: “I honor the author of ‘The Battle Hymn’ … she was born in the city of New York. I could well wish she were a native of Massachusetts. We have no such poetess in New England.”
  #40  
Old 02-02-2020, 03:32 PM
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February 2 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Medal of Honor rewarded to Larry Leonard Maxam for actions on this day in 1968 in Vietnam.

CMOHS.org - Corporal MAXAM, LARRY LEONARD, U.S. Marine Corps
  #41  
Old 02-03-2020, 10:17 PM
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Default Eileen Collins pilots the Space Shuttle.

On this day in US Military history--

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1995 – Astronaut Eileen Collins becomes the first woman to pilot the Space Shuttle as mission STS-63 gets underway from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. STS-63 was the second mission of the US/Russian Shuttle-Mir Program, which carried out the first rendezvous of the American Space Shuttle with Russia’s space station Mir. Known as the ‘Near-Mir’ mission, the flight used Space Shuttle Discovery.
Eileen Collins - Wikipedia
  #42  
Old 02-04-2020, 09:51 AM
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February 4 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Take a look at the this series-- Turn: Washington's Spies - Wikipedia. It tells the story very well.

Quote:
1777 – George Washington appoints Nathaniel Sackett as spymaster over what will become the Culper Ring of spies. During the American War of Independence the Culper ring was assigned to obtain intelligence on the plans of the British enemy forces in New York. His work involved the recruitment of agents and informers, behind the enemy lines, if necessary paid from a purse of $500 sanctioned by Washington. Nathaniel was recommended to General Washington by William Duer, a Continental Congressman, with whom Nathaniel served on the New York committee for detecting and defeating conspiracies. Taking his instructions personally from Washington, Nathaniel set up an intelligence-gathering network in the New York area. He was soon reporting information gathered in the field to Duer and through him to Washington. The Culpers were extremely successful, the more so for having to develop tradecraft as they went, with an intricate arrangement of dead drops and codes.

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  #43  
Old 02-05-2020, 12:37 PM
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February 5 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Three day American Civil War Battle of Petersburg, VA. begins today in 1865.

Quote:
1865 – Union and Confederate forces around Petersburg, Virginia, begin a three-day battle that produces 3,000 casualties but ends with no significant advantage for either side. Dabney’s Mill was another attempt by Union General Ulysses S. Grant to break the siege of Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia. In 1864, Grant and Confederate General Robert E. Lee pounded each other as they wheeled south around the cities. After a month of heavy battling that produced the highest casualty rates of the war, Grant and Lee settled into trenches around Petersburg. These lines eventually stretched 25 miles to Richmond, and the stalemate continued for 10 months. Periodically, Grant mounted offensives either to break through Lee’s lines or envelope the ends. In June, August, and October, these moves failed to extricate the Confederates from their trenches. Now, Grant sent cavalry under General David Gregg to capture a road that carried supplies from Hicksford, Virginia, into Petersburg. On February 5, Gregg moved and captured a few wagons along his objective, the Boydton Plank Road. He found little else, so he pulled back toward the rest of the Union army. Yankee infantry under General Gouverneur K. Warren also moved forward and probed the area at the end of the Confederate’s Petersburg line. The Rebels responded by moving troops into the area. Skirmishes erupted that evening and the fighting continued for two more days as each side maneuvered for an advantage. The fighting surged back and forth around Dabney’s Mill, but the Yankees were never able to penetrate the Confederate lines. The Union suffered 2,000 men killed, wounded, or captured, while the Confederates lost about 1,000. The battle did extend the Petersburg line a few miles to further stretch Lee’s thin lines, but the stalemate continued for six more weeks before Grant’s forces finally sent Lee racing west with the remnants of his army. The chase ended in April when Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House.
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February 6 | This Day in U.S. Military History

What happened in US Military history on February 6.

Medal of Honor awarded to Thomas James Kinsman for actions on this day in Vietnam in 1968.

Thomas James Kinsman - Wikipedia

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  #45  
Old 02-07-2020, 08:03 PM
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February 7 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Howard Walter Gilmore awarded posthumously a Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions on February 7, 1943.

Howard W. Gilmore - Wikipedia

On Eternal Patrol - USS Growler (SS-215)
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