Future retirement is becoming much more difficult:

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Closed Thread
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-02-2015, 10:27 AM
billethkid's Avatar
billethkid billethkid is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 17,552
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3,206 Times in 908 Posts
Default Future retirement is becoming much more difficult:

This article paints a not so rosy picture of the situation facing coming of age retirees:

Half of Americans will see their standard of living fall in retirement - MarketWatch

Whenever there is an opportunity to encourage folks still working to save more I do so. I don't even ask how much they have or want. Just point out that the average person facing retirement is not going to have enough egges in their basket to maintain the lifestyle they would like when they retire.

Some very interesting numbers in the article. Especially how many are currently retiring each day....also the precipitous drop in retirement benefits form companies down to almost nothing.

I am glad we came through life during the times that we did. The American dream was alive and doing well. It can still be but more younger folks need to understand they need to be taking actions now to enjoy the lifestyle we do.

They do understand.....they (just like us when we were their age) have other priorities. I feel fortunate that I woke up to the issue at age 50.
__________________
"Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it"...Mark Twain
  #2  
Old 04-02-2015, 10:40 AM
Challenger's Avatar
Challenger Challenger is offline
Soaring Eagle member
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 2,189
Thanks: 48
Thanked 314 Times in 133 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by billethkid View Post
This article paints a not so rosy picture of the situation facing coming of age retirees:

Half of Americans will see their standard of living fall in retirement - MarketWatch

Whenever there is an opportunity to encourage folks still working to save more I do so. I don't even ask how much they have or want. Just point out that the average person facing retirement is not going to have enough egges in their basket to maintain the lifestyle they would like when they retire.

Some very interesting numbers in the article. Especially how many are currently retiring each day....also the precipitous drop in retirement benefits form companies down to almost nothing.

I am glad we came through life during the times that we did. The American dream was alive and doing well. It can still be but more younger folks need to understand they need to be taking actions now to enjoy the lifestyle we do.

They do understand.....they (just like us when we were their age) have other priorities. I feel fortunate that I woke up to the issue at age 50.
Right on. but need not be so . Most of us have far more than we need and the excess could be the basis for a very comfortable retirement.

Most homes= way too big
Investment in electronics excessive
At least two cars - new every few years, and far bigger than needed.
3,4,5 tvs and unused cable add ons
Cigarettes and alcohol( at $8-10) per glass when eating out for the 4th or 5th time each week.
Rip off Gym memberships.
Giant popcorn and soda at movie ($15-20)

For most( but not all) there are adequate funds for a reasonable retirement.
We can't protect folks from their own excesses.

Give me time to put on my Kevlar!!!
__________________
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing" Edmund Burke 1729-1797
  #3  
Old 04-02-2015, 11:01 AM
manaboutown's Avatar
manaboutown manaboutown is online now
Sage
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NJ, NM, SC, PA, DC, MD, VA, NY, CA, ID and finally FL.
Posts: 5,446
Thanks: 5,400
Thanked 2,197 Times in 789 Posts
Default

Well, the game has changed. Few enjoy defined benefit retirement plans any more. I started investing in stocks in 1959 at age 17, kept at that and investing in commercial real estate and am glad I did!
__________________
"No one is more hated than he who speaks the truth." Plato

“To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.” Thomas Paine

Last edited by manaboutown; 04-02-2015 at 04:02 PM.
  #4  
Old 04-02-2015, 03:17 PM
jnieman jnieman is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,260
Thanks: 2
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Default

We have a son who is 38 and I keep stressing to him to max out his 401k. The company matches a portion I think up to 5%. He will not have the benefit of a retirement that my husband and I enjoy. Hubby has a federal retirement. Guaranteed certain amount per month each and every month. Companies just don't offer those types of retirements that often any more.
  #5  
Old 04-02-2015, 03:38 PM
rubicon rubicon is offline
Email Reported As Spam
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 13,697
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Default

My first response is to say no need to worry if you live in The Village because you can live like a millionaire on your retirement savings.......NOT

Many of us understood we needed to depend on ourselves for retirement. Because during our working years corporations began dumping defined pension plans and raising contribution for other benefits. We put away as much as we could and focused on need vis a vis want.

We continue to live that way now and continue to bank income as much as we can in order to maintain our estate for personal and family reasons.

Being a prudent spender we believe is essential when you retire
  #6  
Old 04-03-2015, 02:54 PM
2BNTV's Avatar
2BNTV 2BNTV is offline
Sage
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 10,696
Thanks: 1
Thanked 114 Times in 46 Posts
Default

Unfortunately for them, people did not listen to financially savvy people that one should save 10% or more of their salary for their future after all their bills are paid. I don't know what the statistic by AARP is at the moment but many people don't have 25K in savings when they are ready to retire.

It's sad that so many people didn't take advantage of the tax deferred options that companies offer or other investment opportunities. I have heard the sad lament that so many people have said, "I don't have enough in my paycheck to put away, any savings".

Some people have it backwards saying they will save after, (fill in the blank), and realize too late in life they should have saved more.

I always say, "it doesn't pay to be stupid about money".
__________________
"It doesn't cost "nuttin", to be nice". MOM

I just want to do the right thing! Uncle Joe, (my hero).
  #7  
Old 04-03-2015, 04:00 PM
Cisco Kid's Avatar
Cisco Kid Cisco Kid is offline
Platinum member
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Monticello IL
Posts: 1,886
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Default

I am feeling this pain.
My wife's pension was frozen years ago.
Mine has been trimmed .
My 401K that I have looks good , but knock on wood we don't take any more hits.
Living in IL, every time you turn around you have a new tax.
We live in a under 1500 sq ft house. My truck is a 2002.
I don't do smartphones, or any of the gotta have crap.
My hobby is fishing and my dogs.
To top it off the company I work for is moving out of state.
Good grief.
__________________
My alarm doesn't have a snooze button. It has a paw.

Chloe
&
Lulu
  #8  
Old 04-04-2015, 02:24 PM
Bavarian Bavarian is offline
Veteran member
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Bridgeport Village at Laurel Valley
Posts: 778
Thanks: 55
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jnieman View Post
We have a son who is 38 and I keep stressing to him to max out his 401k. The company matches a portion I think up to 5%. He will not have the benefit of a retirement that my husband and I enjoy. Hubby has a federal retirement. Guaranteed certain amount per month each and every month. Companies just don't offer those types of retirements that often any more.
Fellow Fed, great points. People need an IRA also, if they can. Buy good stocks and reinvest the dividents. My main worry is who in the next generation will be able to afford to buy our houses when it comes to downsize or move to assisted living. There's always the Reverse Mortgage.
__________________
Kyrie Eleison
Philadelphia(Germantown) 20 years, Brandywine Hundred, DE 3 years, St. Mary's County, MD 38 years, Villages
  #9  
Old 04-04-2015, 03:39 PM
justjim justjim is offline
Sage
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Illinois, Tennesee, Florida, Village of Caroline, Sanibel, LaBelle
Posts: 4,914
Thanks: 58
Thanked 667 Times in 255 Posts
Default

It's all about the lifestyle you live prior to retirement. My advise to my kids: 1. Get a good education. 2. When you marry don't have more kids than you can afford. 3. Always pay yourself first ----every paycheck---starting with 5% of gross and put it in a Roth IRA and/or a 401k. As you earn more add to the 5%.

If you do this, you will still have a good lifestyle prior to retirement and retirement will take care of itself.
__________________
Most people are as happy as they make up their mind to be. Abraham Lincoln
  #10  
Old 04-04-2015, 06:23 PM
rjm1cc's Avatar
rjm1cc rjm1cc is offline
Soaring Eagle member
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,054
Thanks: 93
Thanked 268 Times in 104 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jnieman View Post
We have a son who is 38 and I keep stressing to him to max out his 401k. The company matches a portion I think up to 5%. He will not have the benefit of a retirement that my husband and I enjoy. Hubby has a federal retirement. Guaranteed certain amount per month each and every month. Companies just don't offer those types of retirements that often any more.
I had a person working for me who maxed out her 401k, no co. match, and had over a million when I retired.
  #11  
Old 04-04-2015, 07:38 PM
JGVillages JGVillages is offline
Gold member
Join Date: May 2014
Location: TV Calumet Grove
Posts: 1,029
Thanks: 37
Thanked 671 Times in 144 Posts
Default

High Federal Corporate tax rates and the Fed's plan for wealth re-distribution. Sorry but if we continue on the path of enabiling those who wish to have us pay for their desire to get everything for nothing, the future genrations 5 or 10% contribution to retirement will have to be re-directed to wealth re-distribution.
  #12  
Old 04-04-2015, 07:41 PM
Trayderjoe's Avatar
Trayderjoe Trayderjoe is offline
Veteran member
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: The Villages Lake Sumter-Finally!
Posts: 691
Thanks: 0
Thanked 106 Times in 31 Posts
Default Was disappointed.......

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2BNTV View Post
Unfortunately for them, people did not listen to financially savvy people that one should save 10% or more of their salary for their future after all their bills are paid. I don't know what the statistic by AARP is at the moment but many people don't have 25K in savings when they are ready to retire.

It's sad that so many people didn't take advantage of the tax deferred options that companies offer or other investment opportunities. I have heard the sad lament that so many people have said, "I don't have enough in my paycheck to put away, any savings".

Some people have it backwards saying they will save after, (fill in the blank), and realize too late in life they should have saved more.

I always say, "it doesn't pay to be stupid about money".
My company started offering financial seminars for free to employees. The seminars were set up for financial planning for those 50 and older and for those under 50. I was in the 50 and over seminar, and was very disappointed to see the responses to the investment counselor asking who has NOT used the pension modeler tool the company had available, and who felt that their pension would cover their retirement expenses. Many people had not seen or knew about the tool (actually not a "biggie" but they could have seen what their projected income would be), and what was worse, there were too many people (1 is actually too many) who thought the company pension would support them. I think that there were quite a few people who realized that retirement might be a distant reality for them-most were in the "I'll save later" scenario you pointed out 2BNTV. I am thankful that my nephew listened to me and began getting money into his 401K early in his career and had his then fiancee do the same-especially since neither will get pensions from their companies.
__________________
"Kindness is more important than wisdom, and the recognition of this is the beginning of wisdom."
-
Theodore Rubin
  #13  
Old 04-04-2015, 08:11 PM
manaboutown's Avatar
manaboutown manaboutown is online now
Sage
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NJ, NM, SC, PA, DC, MD, VA, NY, CA, ID and finally FL.
Posts: 5,446
Thanks: 5,400
Thanked 2,197 Times in 789 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bavarian View Post
Fellow Fed, great points. People need an IRA also, if they can. Buy good stocks and reinvest the dividents. My main worry is who in the next generation will be able to afford to buy our houses when it comes to downsize or move to assisted living. There's always the Reverse Mortgage.
The baby boom was followed by a baby bust. In the years to come selling a home in a retirement community may be difficult.

Also, over the last several years the stock market has been driven by boomers investing for retirement. As boomers sell off shares to fund their golden years prices (P/Es) may drop.
__________________
"No one is more hated than he who speaks the truth." Plato

“To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.” Thomas Paine
  #14  
Old 04-04-2015, 08:34 PM
asianthree's Avatar
asianthree asianthree is offline
Sage
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Pennacamp, Fernandinia 2 Frogs
Posts: 7,159
Thanks: 19
Thanked 1,098 Times in 419 Posts
Default

Or you can retire and drop dead one week later. There have been four people where I work that have died in the past three months within weeks of retiring. And this week close friend died 3 days before her retirement party. We will be ok, with no structured money from our jobs, that disappeared, when company was sold. We invested and spend wisely. I do not lecture my children, as to their course of life.
__________________
Do not worry about things you can not change
  #15  
Old 04-04-2015, 10:50 PM
maryanna630 maryanna630 is offline
Senior Member
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 217
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 1 Post
Default

Has anyone thought of renting in retirement instead of buying? We have just sold our house in Mexico and have cash. We always owned but are not so sure this is still the best thing. Living in Mexico for more than seven years, we have lost the consumerism and learned the joy of living a simple life. I am sure we will experience culture shock when we move to TV.
All opinions would be welcomed.
Closed Thread

Thread Tools

You are viewing a new design of the TOTV site. Click here to revert to the old version.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:33 PM.