In the home humidity levels/control

In the home humidity levels/control

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  #21  
Old 07-25-2019, 03:17 PM
anothersteve anothersteve is offline
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Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
I sure like all those equations. But, my concern is that, if the house temperature is 92 degrees, the air conditioning is probably almost never running. So, unless the fan is blowing air through the house, the dry air will not get distributed at all. And, yes the air in stagnant areas could become very humid. I would never want my house to have a constant air temperature of 92 degrees, regardless of the humidity level. You may get away with 80 or 82 degrees.
It's fine. The two homes I mentioned have been doing this for the last 5 yrs, as directed by Munn's, without any issues whatsoever.
Steve
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  #22  
Old 07-25-2019, 03:25 PM
biker1 biker1 is offline
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Does your neighbor have a special vacation setting whereby the system ignores the temperature setpoint and only turns on when the relative humidity setpoint is exceeded? If so, this sounds a bit strange. I would expect (want) the system to run when either the temperature setpoint or the relative humidity setpoint is exceeded. Setting the temperature setpoint in the low 80s and the relative humidity setpoint around 50-60% would be reasonable.

Why? Relative humidity is exponentially related to temperature and is also limited on how high it can go with hot temperatures. If the temperature in the house gets hot enough, you may never exceed the relative humidity set point. For example, if the temperature in the house was to reach 95F then the relative humidity will probably never exceed 60%. In this situation, the system will never come on but there could be a fairly high absolute moisture level (the dew point) in the house.


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Originally Posted by Nucky View Post
I'm watching a house for a neighbor and the facts are the Thermostat is set to 75 Degrees the Temperature in his house is 92 Degrees and the Humidistat is set to 60.

He said other people who have watched his home have had the same concern as me but he said as long as the Humidistat is at 60 then things are Kool.

I feel terrible about leaving his home like that but I followed his direction to a T.

Could it be correct? I could use a hand here. It's Bleeding Hot In That House!
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  #23  
Old 07-25-2019, 03:39 PM
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dewilson58 dewilson58 is offline
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Originally Posted by biker1 View Post
Does your neighbor have a special vacation setting whereby the system ignores the temperature setpoint and only turns on when the relative humidity setpoint is exceeded? If so, this sounds a bit strange. I would expect (want) the system to run when either the temperature setpoint or the relative humidity setpoint is exceeded. Setting the temperature setpoint in the low 80s and the relative humidity setpoint around 50-60% would be reasonable.

Why? Relative humidity is exponentially related to temperature and is also limited on how high it can go with hot temperatures. If the temperature in the house gets hot enough, you may never exceed the relative humidity set point. For example, if the temperature in the house was to reach 95F then the relative humidity will probably never exceed 60%. In this situation, the system will never come on but there could be a fairly high absolute moisture level (the dew point) in the house.



Good Post.
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  #24  
Old 07-25-2019, 03:48 PM
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Nucky Nucky is offline
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Originally Posted by biker1 View Post
Does your neighbor have a special vacation setting whereby the system ignores the temperature setpoint and only turns on when the relative humidity setpoint is exceeded? If so, this sounds a bit strange. I would expect (want) the system to run when either the temperature setpoint or the relative humidity setpoint is exceeded. Setting the temperature setpoint in the low 80s and the relative humidity setpoint around 50-60% would be reasonable.

Why? Relative humidity is exponentially related to temperature and is also limited on how high it can go with hot temperatures. If the temperature in the house gets hot enough, you may never exceed the relative humidity set point. For example, if the temperature in the house was to reach 95F then the relative humidity will probably never exceed 60%. In this situation, the system will never come on but there could be a fairly high absolute moisture level (the dew point) in the house.
His Vacation Setting is Set it to Cool 75 Degrees on the Thermostat and on the Humidistat there is a dash mark - that the knob is turned to and it is at the mark between 50 & 70 but just a - it does not have a number. I would describe it as 60. (Just Being Accurate) Clear step by step directions are on an Index Card that is from the Original Owner from 32 years ago. It is a Manufactured Home in Perfect, Showroom, Day One Condition. The Serial Number on the Home is #2 I did put new batteries in his Thermostat Today. Fresh Red Duracell's. I'm mainly there to watch for Skylite Leaks and animal invasions. So far so good.

I tell you in the last week or so my annual membership fee to belong to TOTV'S has paid off. The help I've gotten is priceless. Thank's a lot! To you all.
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  #25  
Old 07-25-2019, 03:50 PM
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dewilson58 dewilson58 is offline
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Originally Posted by Nucky View Post
His Vacation Setting is Set it to Cool 75 Degrees on the Thermostat and on the Humidistat there is a dash mark - that the knob is turned to and it is at the mark between 50 & 70 but just a - it does not have a number. I would describe it as 60. (Just Being Accurate) Clear step by step directions are on an Index Card that is from the Original Owner from 32 years ago. It is a Manufactured Home in Perfect, Showroom, Day One Condition. The Serial Number on the Home is #2 I did put new batteries in his Thermostat Today. Fresh Red Duracell's. I'm mainly there to watch for Skylite Leaks and animal invasions. So far so good.

I tell you in the last week or so my annual membership fee to belong to TOTV'S has paid off. The help I've gotten is priceless. Thank's a lot! To you all.



Probably zero insulation in that old dog.......the home, not the owner.
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  #26  
Old 07-25-2019, 04:50 PM
anothersteve anothersteve is offline
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Originally Posted by dewilson58 View Post
Probably zero insulation in that old dog.......the home, not the owner.
HUD code '76. It's insulated, common misconception.
https://www.hud.gov/sites/documents/MHCCFRPARTIV.PDF

Steve
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