Working To Live Vs. Living To Work

Working To Live Vs. Living To Work

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Working To Live Vs. Living To Work
  #1  
Old 08-08-2019, 08:15 PM
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Schaumburger Schaumburger is offline
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Default Working To Live Vs. Living To Work

Going to funerals puts me in a reflective mood.

Yesterday I went to the funeral of the husband of a long time friend/former coworker of mine. Al was fortunate to get a very nice early retirement package at age 60. He took the retirement package with happiness and enjoyed his years of retirement. Unfortunately he was diagnosed with a brain tumor 2 years ago, and passed away a few days ago at the age of 79.
Al worked to live.

Last year I went to the funeral of another long time friend/former coworker who fought serious illness for the last several years of her life. About 4 years before Pat passed away, she was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes after her blood sugar soared. Pat spent 3 days in the hospital getting her blood sugar under control. I gently suggested to Pat that maybe it was time for her to cut back and work part-time and enjoy her grandchildren. Her answer was "I'm too busy at work to go to part time hours. I will probably die at my desk."

Unfortunately, Pat's cancer came back in early last year. Finally she told her employer that she was taking a medical leave of absence "Until I get better." Two weeks later she was in hospice. Two weeks after that Pat passed away. So Pat almost did "die at her desk."
Pat lived to work.

I guess we all must do what makes us happy and fulfilled, but if someone left $500K in my mailbox tomorrow, I would drop down to work 25 hours a week in a New York minute (and kidnap my father and move both of us to The Villages).
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  #2  
Old 08-08-2019, 08:46 PM
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Tom C Tom C is offline
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A fellow worker died suddenly just a couple weeks ago... he was "looking forward" to retirement....

Your message is one that everyone that is 50 or greater needs to hear. Just as we financially plan for retirement, we need to stick to our work plans and GET AWAY FROM WORK. You can not take it with you... and remember time is priceless.
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  #3  
Old 08-08-2019, 08:47 PM
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I loved my work as a Marketing Manager for a fortune 500 company, but I took retirement at 62 and never looked back!
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  #4  
Old 08-08-2019, 09:47 PM
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Two men I was close to died at 61 and 62. I retired from my profession and initiated a divorce at age 52. The following 25 years have been among the best years of my life!
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  #5  
Old 08-08-2019, 10:06 PM
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I have been fortunate enough to have taken some fairly long breaks between chapters of my chosen career, such that should I not wake up tomorrow (now, now, don't get your hopes up...and you know who I mean )...I would not have a single regret.

There are way too many stories of those who pushed themselves their entire working lives and weren't able to enjoy more than a very short time...of actual 'retirement.'

I subscribe to the theory that folks should put just as much effort into having fun and squeezing enjoyment out of every minute of life...the same as they applied themselves to their jobs/careers.
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  #6  
Old 08-08-2019, 10:17 PM
Jazuela Jazuela is offline
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We were on the right track to retirement, with a pension, a 401K, and guaranteed comprehensive health insurance until medicare kicked in. Needed just a few improvements on the house so that in 2 years we could sell it and move to our retirement in the Villages. Then the company eliminated the department. Two years too young for Social Security, AND since the job no longer existed, the health insurance was eliminated as well.

Unexpected things out of your control can happen at any age, at any income level. You think everything is going great, you're THIS CLOSE to not having to ever work again, and BOOM. You're forced to sell and move to a less-perfect house, two years too early, without the income generated to cover the expense, the bills are piling up, and your life's savings is dwindling one month at a time.

Don't assume that everyone can save up for the future. You can try. And you should try. But there's no guarantee that you'll make it far enough to be able to say "I'm retired." The concept can be ripped from you in a single company letter to the employees.
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  #7  
Old 08-08-2019, 10:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
We were on the right track to retirement, with a pension, a 401K, and guaranteed comprehensive health insurance until medicare kicked in. Needed just a few improvements on the house so that in 2 years we could sell it and move to our retirement in the Villages. Then the company eliminated the department. Two years too young for Social Security, AND since the job no longer existed, the health insurance was eliminated as well.

Unexpected things out of your control can happen at any age, at any income level. You think everything is going great, you're THIS CLOSE to not having to ever work again, and BOOM. You're forced to sell and move to a less-perfect house, two years too early, without the income generated to cover the expense, the bills are piling up, and your life's savings is dwindling one month at a time.

Don't assume that everyone can save up for the future. You can try. And you should try. But there's no guarantee that you'll make it far enough to be able to say "I'm retired." The concept can be ripped from you in a single company letter to the employees.
And all too many companies do it on purpose, simply to cut costs...to enrich stockholders and/or owners even more.

Good luck.
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  #8  
Old 08-09-2019, 08:19 AM
Carla B Carla B is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdNoMore View Post
And all too many companies do it on purpose, simply to cut costs...to enrich stockholders and/or owners even more.

Good luck.
That seems to be the new norm.
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  #9  
Old 08-09-2019, 08:23 AM
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Trayderjoe Trayderjoe is offline
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There was a gentleman who worked in the maintenance department at one of the sites I supported, and he decided to retire at age 70. Many co-workers chided him that he should stick around as the company was in the process of a merger and if he waited, he would collect 100 weeks pay (yes, 100 weeks) if he was selected for separation AFTER the merger. The merger was almost two years into the process, but not finalized, and so he decided that he was not going to wait. He was 70, felt he was financially secure and wanted to enjoy whatever time he had left with his family. Unfortunately, 6 months after he retired, his wife of about 50 years unexpectedly passed away. I am sure he was far happier to have had that time with his wife than the real possibility of collecting 100 weeks pay.

On the other side, my last leader, who was one of the best leaders I had, is still working because of finances. He is taking Nexium in the morning, and Prilosec at night. He is caught between supporting his staff and the unreasonable demands of his leader and the client leaders. I know exactly what he is going through as I turned down a promotion to take a similar role at another site-I did not want the stress, especially near the end of my career.

I am fortunate that I was able to retire before the age of 60 and I too have never looked back. I honestly think the stress might have done me in.
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  #10  
Old 08-09-2019, 08:32 AM
B-flat B-flat is offline
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My lesson was this, my dad 1 month short of retirement at age 64 died of cancer. With that said I had my eyes set on retiring at age 62 and I did! I’ve been retired for 6 years and do not regret the decision especially since last year I lost a 67 year old life long friend, earlier this year another 69 year old life long friend died in his sleep. I’m a part time musician and still play gigs, if I dropped dead at a music gig, I’d say what a wonderful way to pass i.e. doing what I love. Ok got to pack up my keyboard, amplification to head to an early afternoon gig at an assisted living facility.
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