Awesome home up-grade for your Kitchen

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  #1  
Old 02-26-2015, 01:08 PM
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Default Awesome home up-grade for your Kitchen

Here is an easy up-grade to your kitchen that will cost you about $200 DIY.

Replace all or some of your recessed can light fixtures with LED fixtures. We did the three over the sink first and the difference was amazing as far as the light these LED fixtures (not bulbs ) give off. We bought the these fixtures at Lowes for $25 each but after seeing how easy it was to do (under 3 mins per light & no wiring) we ordered 5 more online for under $20 each. I would suggest getting them all online at Amazon.

To install pull down the recess can from the ceiling until extended. Pinch the two wire hooks and it will drop all the way down. Then pinch the socket and it will come out. The LED fixtures and a pig-tail that will screw into the socket up in your ceiling. Install the new fixture the same way you took the old can out by pinching the wire tabs and hooking them back in. If you can stand on a ladder for 3 minutes you are done.

After installing them your kitchen will light up like it is daylight and yes you can still dim them ! You might say why not just install LED bulbs! Here is why... the bulbs and fixtures cost about the same (fixtures may be a few $$ more) but the fixtures have many more LED's and spread the light evenly. Plus it is a clean look and you do not see any bulb.
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Old 02-26-2015, 03:42 PM
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Thanks for the tip
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Old 02-26-2015, 05:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNLAKEPANDA View Post
Here is an easy up-grade to your kitchen that will cost you about $200 DIY.

Replace all or some of your recessed can light fixtures with LED fixtures. We did the three over the sink first and the difference was amazing as far as the light these LED fixtures (not bulbs ) give off. We bought the these fixtures at Lowes for $25 each but after seeing how easy it was to do (under 3 mins per light & no wiring) we ordered 5 more online for under $20 each. I would suggest getting them all online at Amazon.

To install pull down the recess can from the ceiling until extended. Pinch the two wire hooks and it will drop all the way down. Then pinch the socket and it will come out. The LED fixtures and a pig-tail that will screw into the socket up in your ceiling. Install the new fixture the same way you took the old can out by pinching the wire tabs and hooking them back in. If you can stand on a ladder for 3 minutes you are done.

After installing them your kitchen will light up like it is daylight and yes you can still dim them ! You might say why not just install LED bulbs! Here is why... the bulbs and fixtures cost about the same (fixtures may be a few $$ more) but the fixtures have many more LED's and spread the light evenly. Plus it is a clean look and you do not see any bulb.
Did your old fixtures have the eyelids? Do you still have the part number on fixtures you picked up at Lowes. Thanks for post.
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Old 02-26-2015, 06:16 PM
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Default Amazon item #

Do you have the Amazon item number for the units?
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Old 02-26-2015, 07:16 PM
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Here is the Amazon item: TorchStar 19Watt 6-inch ENERGY STAR UL-listed Dimmable Retrofit LED Recessed Lighting Fixture - 2700K Warm White LED Ceiling Light - 1200LM 120W Equivalent Recessed Downlight

At Lowes go to the lighting section and look for LED retro fit ceiling cans. They have both 2700k and 3000k fixtures. I bought the 3000k at Lowes but got the 2700k at Amazon and I can not see any difference in color or brightness.
  #6  
Old 02-26-2015, 08:52 PM
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You can also just replace the bulbs. I bought CREE regular lamp bulbs and used these for well over a year in the existing cans. At the time, the same wattage PAR LED equivalent was NOT as bright and cost almost 3 times as much. Since my cans did NOT have eyelids, and were white in color the light from a regular LED bulb actually looks like that from a LED flood light. These were much brighter then the original incandescent bulbs.
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Old 02-26-2015, 09:20 PM
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I've replaced all mine (bulbs not fixtures) with 65W equivalent LEDs.
Their actual wattage is approx. 8.5 W. Six bulbs replaced in the kitchen and the light is whiter and brighter than the original 65W incandescent bulbs and they are dimmable. When all six bulbs are lit, they use less than ONE of the original bulbs. They produce minimal heat and can last up to 22 years. I purchased the LED spots on sale at Ace Hardware on sale for $22/pair.

The fixture above the dining room table had three 100W bulbs. In the summer when it was hot, the heat from the fixture made it uncomfortable sitting at the table. I replaced the incandescent 100W bulbs with three 75W equivalent LED bulbs. Just as much light...and the fixture is cool to the touch. The three bulbs use less than 20W... 1/15th of the originals.

Thanks OP for your information...It seems you're as impressed with LEDs as much as I am.


























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Old 02-27-2015, 02:31 AM
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We are working on replacing all the lights in our new house with LEDs. Our first was the front lamp post light bulbs and bathroom fixtures, and then we replaced every flood light in the house and lanai with bright bulbs. The LED bulbs come in dimmable and non-dimmable, in different colors (i.e. warm, cool, daylight) and the lumens number is the brightness. (The higher the lumens, the brighter the bulb light.) They are easy to compare, they save energy, last forever, and don't put out the same heat (as the old style standard bulbs).

We are just at a loss as to why you need to go to the expense of replacing the whole fixture when you can get the equivalent of 100W dimmable flood light bulbs (that fill up the eyeball fixture) for about $10+/- apiece.
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Old 02-27-2015, 06:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunner View Post
We are working on replacing all the lights in our new house with LEDs. Our first was the front lamp post light bulbs and bathroom fixtures, and then we replaced every flood light in the house and lanai with bright bulbs. The LED bulbs come in dimmable and non-dimmable, in different colors (i.e. warm, cool, daylight) and the lumens number is the brightness. (The higher the lumens, the brighter the bulb light.) They are easy to compare, they save energy, last forever, and don't put out the same heat (as the old style standard bulbs).

We are just at a loss as to why you need to go to the expense of replacing the whole fixture when you can get the equivalent of 100W dimmable flood light bulbs (that fill up the eyeball fixture) for about $10+/- apiece.
The above is an excellent question. I look forward to the reply as well.

I have a question about the model you listed as the one you purchased. It is listed as "warm"....my base reference would be when the CFL originally came out it was a bright white un-natural light. Later they became more warm...
with the LCD as stated is a new level of brightness........but how would you describe the color or brightness.

I am interested but do not want or like the bright white.
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Old 02-27-2015, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNLAKEPANDA View Post
Here is an easy up-grade to your kitchen that will cost you about $200 DIY.

Replace all or some of your recessed can light fixtures with LED fixtures. We did the three over the sink first and the difference was amazing as far as the light these LED fixtures (not bulbs ) give off. We bought the these fixtures at Lowes for $25 each but after seeing how easy it was to do (under 3 mins per light & no wiring) we ordered 5 more online for under $20 each. I would suggest getting them all online at Amazon.

To install pull down the recess can from the ceiling until extended. Pinch the two wire hooks and it will drop all the way down. Then pinch the socket and it will come out. The LED fixtures and a pig-tail that will screw into the socket up in your ceiling. Install the new fixture the same way you took the old can out by pinching the wire tabs and hooking them back in. If you can stand on a ladder for 3 minutes you are done.

After installing them your kitchen will light up like it is daylight and yes you can still dim them ! You might say why not just install LED bulbs! Here is why... the bulbs and fixtures cost about the same (fixtures may be a few $$ more) but the fixtures have many more LED's and spread the light evenly. Plus it is a clean look and you do not see any bulb.

Do they LOOK any different? I keep thinking what a simple way this is to increase the light.

Could you snap a picture?

Many thanks for this suggestion.
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Old 02-27-2015, 10:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billethkid View Post
The above is an excellent question. I look forward to the reply as well.

I have a question about the model you listed as the one you purchased. It is listed as "warm"....my base reference would be when the CFL originally came out it was a bright white un-natural light. Later they became more warm...
with the LCD as stated is a new level of brightness........but how would you describe the color or brightness.

I am interested but do not want or like the bright white.
We did a little on-line and in store research before buying our lights. We are not sure that LED lights have uniform fixed industry standards on color description yet. On a personal preference, we decided to stay away from anything advertised as "Daylight", as this light choice, in general, is too harsh for our tastes. (We do know an electrician who recommends this choice for its brightness, especially for garage areas, but it is not for us.) We also looked for lights that were at least 800 lumens. The flood lights do shine brighter than the ones we replaced. (It may be that the light is dispersed in a wider area.) Not all are on a dimmer switch, and those that are not, are not often used for long periods of time. The light is brighter from the kitchen flood lights (and others), almost like a sunlight coming in from overhead. Our home model is a little darker inside (due to the covered lanai), so we are happy with the choices we made here and don't feel the need to add skylights, as others have done to lighten up the interior.

The next part of our transition will be replacing the bulbs in individual lamps. The incandescent bulbs look better right now than some of the CFLs we use, but the LEDs appear to be far superior to both. We may wait a bit to see if there is more improvement on the three-way LED lights by choices, price, and performance before finishing this stage. We already can't wait to get rid of the CFLs, (liked their energy savings but not the light output). It almost seems as if the LED industry has ramped up the low wattage equivalent bulbs faster than the high wattage equivalents, so there are more choices in the lower end. We are still in the learning curve here.
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Old 02-27-2015, 01:46 PM
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I have been using the CREE LED bulbs as the other ones burn out.
But Here is something similar I think

Commercial Electric 5 in. and 6 in. White Recessed LED Trim with 90 CRI, 2700K (2-Pack)-CER6730AWH27-2 - The Home Depot
  #13  
Old 02-27-2015, 03:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryW View Post
I have been using the CREE LED bulbs as the other ones burn out.
But Here is something similar I think

Commercial Electric 5 in. and 6 in. White Recessed LED Trim with 90 CRI, 2700K (2-Pack)-CER6730AWH27-2 - The Home Depot
These are the ones I installed in a friends home. As you can see, the bulb is sealed behind the glass...making it much nicer looking than the ones where the floodlight bulb is exposed.

The can lights that currently come in homes I have measured to be about 250 degrees when on, adding to the heat load in the summer and using much more electricity. Standing below a few of these when on makes you feel like you are under heat lamps almost.

Note that when you use these you are NOT replacing the whole can light fixture. You are only replacing the inner white portion and the old bulb. The main part of the fixture in the attic is still used. This is an easy install....I installed 5 of these in under 15 minutes. They are much brighter then the ones they replaced.

On a related note......the most expensive fixture you have in your home is your post light. That is on all night long every night of the year. Replacing one 75 watt bulb, (or three 25 watt bulbs) with LED equivalents will save you a boatload of money and you most likely will never have to replace that bulb again. Note that the average 3 light post light commonly found in The Villages costs about $83.00 a year to keep on, according to an Electrician friend of mine.....

Hope this helps!

Frank D.
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