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  #31  
Old 06-09-2011, 10:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Freeda View Post
I used to think that what I did in my legal career was so great that I would be hobbling around in a courtroom with a cane and a little gray bun someday - that's what I remember saying; I just couldn't imagine a life without it; my career so defined me as a person that I couldn't separate myself from it. So I can really understand what you are feeling. What happened for me is that I stumbled onto another interest, wholly unexpectedly, that fascinated me, and because of that I gradually gave up my law practice, so the separation from it was a less 'drastic' step, which is something that I realize isn't as easy with a job. But what I found, and it became even much more evident once we moved to TV, is that there is alot to be said for free, uncommitted, unstructured time (something that was rare during my career); and time to consider and learn about other things. I started seeing myself as very narrow, because I had been so immersed in law and raising children, the only two things I had really focused on for most of my life, that I didn't even realize what else I was missing out on in life.

Maybe for someone who has a job, it might be helpful to just take off a few weeks or months, or as long as you can, rent a home in TV, and totally, deliberately absorb yourself in TV lifestyle. You may be surprised at all there is here - not just 'to do' to fill up your time (I hate the idea of just 'killing' time), but opportunities for learning and evolving as a person. There are so many interesting and talented people here that I feel like in the past 3 years of living here I have grown alot as a person. The clubs program here, for example, gives us the opportunity to learn from the collective knowledge and experience of educated, intelligent people from all over the world and from many different backgrounds. There are many purposeful, self-fulfilling things you can do outside of a job, including joining public service organizations, etc. Then, there is also travel!

Your analogy of 'eating ice cream for every meal' is a good way to describe how I now in retrospect feel that my life was during my career, because the requirements of my work kept life pretty much the same, and didn't allow me to experience alot of change and personal growth, or time to try new things.
Freeda, my hubby and I thoroughly enjoyed reading your thoughts. When the time comes for him to retire it will not be "from" something but "to" something. And I can't think of a better place place than The Villages! Lord willing, we hope to join y'all in a couple of years @ the ripe young age of 55!

Trudy
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  #32  
Old 06-10-2011, 05:46 AM
railroadman railroadman is offline
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Retiring in two years from the railroad at 57. Working 35 years will be enough for me. I like to stay fit and active, so after one visit, to the Villages. I new, it was the place for me. "Life is to Short! not to be Happy!
  #33  
Old 06-10-2011, 10:09 AM
billybye billybye is offline
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I am in similar situation. We recently (last Nov.) moved from South Florida. I am elgible for Medicare, but my wife has another 5 years to go.
We both planned on working here for a while, me to keep from depleting my IRA (which is all I have besides SS) and my wife for health benefits.
My wife finally got a job about a month ago which has good benefits (health industry) but the pay is a little more than half what she made in Boca Raton.
I had so many interviews, I could almost answer the questions before they were asked. I decided to only work part time and use my gof cart for transportation, which limited me somewhat. Just found a part time job at exactly 45% the hourly rate I was paid in Pompano Beach, FL.
But!!!! We are extremely happy we made the move and would do it again - it is all worth living in paradise.
I am just pointing out that the pay scale here is pretty weak and most only hire part time to not have to pay benefits.
As far as taking early retirement goes if you have longevity in your immediate family (mother and father) it is best to wait as long as you can still work.
If you think early is better - i think about my father who retired at 55 and took Social Security at 62 - he is 91 now and wish he had waited.
  #34  
Old 06-10-2011, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by billybye View Post

i think about my father who retired at 55 and took Social Security at 62 - he is 91 now and wish he had waited.
Having second thoughts at 91 is not necessarily a bad thing!
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  #35  
Old 06-10-2011, 12:47 PM
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Retirement Advice: Don't retire
  #36  
Old 06-10-2011, 12:48 PM
ajdeck ajdeck is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billybye View Post

I am in similar situation. We recently (last Nov.) moved from South Florida. I am elgible for Medicare, but my wife has another 5 years to go.
We both planned on working here for a while, me to keep from depleting my IRA (which is all I have besides SS) and my wife for health benefits.
My wife finally got a job about a month ago which has good benefits (health industry) but the pay is a little more than half what she made in Boca Raton.
I had so many interviews, I could almost answer the questions before they were asked. I decided to only work part time and use my gof cart for transportation, which limited me somewhat. Just found a part time job at exactly 45% the hourly rate I was paid in Pompano Beach, FL.
But!!!! We are extremely happy we made the move and would do it again - it is all worth living in paradise.
I am just pointing out that the pay scale here is pretty weak and most only hire part time to not have to pay benefits.
As far as taking early retirement goes if you have longevity in your immediate family (mother and father) it is best to wait as long as you can still work.
If you think early is better - i think about my father who retired at 55 and took Social Security at 62 - he is 91 now and wish he had waited.


How many of those 36 years did he have nothing to do but enjoy himself?

And what would he have said if he only had 10 years and then had a stroke and could never do the fun things again?
  #37  
Old 06-10-2011, 01:56 PM
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The good Lord, will give you the first 50 years! The second 50, you have to work for.
  #38  
Old 06-10-2011, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by bandsdavis View Post
I turned 62 last Thursday, and retired last Friday. While I enjoyed my job (and signed a consulting agreement with the company so I can still contribute when needed) the prospect of freedom to do the things I really enjoy and experience some new things as well is just too exciting to pass up. My new mantra is "It's better to retire a year too early than a day too late." Now we just have to sell the house in VA and we are TV bound!

B.
B, where in Va are you?

Jim
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  #39  
Old 06-12-2011, 06:39 PM
KEVIN & JOSIE KEVIN & JOSIE is offline
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I recently retired at only 53. I loved my job, but the company was downsizing and outsourcing everywhere and anywhere it could. After 30 years of dedication, I was thankful that I did not lose all I worked for. My very close friend recently retired early, moved to Florida, and died two years later at only 48 years young. I guess you can't plan every aspect of our lives. You plan on working until 62, things and events change. The most important thing is your health, friends, family and hapiness....and be thankful for everyday...and live it to the fullest.
  #40  
Old 07-18-2011, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by KEVIN & JOSIE View Post
I recently retired at only 53. I loved my job, but the company was downsizing and outsourcing everywhere and anywhere it could. After 30 years of dedication, I was thankful that I did not lose all I worked for. My very close friend recently retired early, moved to Florida, and died two years later at only 48 years young. I guess you can't plan every aspect of our lives. You plan on working until 62, things and events change. The most important thing is your health, friends, family and hapiness....and be thankful for everyday...and live it to the fullest.
You are right, live every day like it is your last because one day you will be right!
  #41  
Old 07-21-2011, 10:44 AM
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I love the idea of retiring asap and TV is a wonderful place to live but I'm surprised at how many comments say health is the number one consideration (and I agree) but I've been told Florida ranks so low as far as good healthcare. Coming from NY where I feel healthcare is very good and my experiences with TV doctors has been very disappointing, I would love to hear comments from those who were concerned about the healthcare in TV versus their home state and how they handled it. BTW ... I have no major Heath problems as of now but I am a widow with no family in Florida.
  #42  
Old 07-21-2011, 11:12 AM
justanormalgirl justanormalgirl is offline
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Originally Posted by 2BNTV View Post
At the end of the article they gave three items to consider:
1. Work as long as you can.
2. Save like you will be on your own tomorrow.
3. Live each day like it could be your last.
Not to be critical or anything but I always see the humorous side of life. Sooo, while it may be good advice, I have a question:

If you're working as long as you can to save like you'll be on your own tomorrow how on earth are you supposed to live each day like it might be your last??
  #43  
Old 07-21-2011, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by 2BNTV View Post
I was on Yahoo Finance this morning and they were discussing the virtue of working until one is 70 as opposed to retiring at 62. These articles are generic and everyone must decide for themselves when is their best time to retire.

At the end of the article they gave three items to consider:
1. Work as long as you can.
2. Save like you will be on your own tomorrow.
3. Live each day like it could be your last.
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanormalgirl View Post
Not to be critical or anything but I always see the humorous side of life. Sooo, while it may be good advice, I have a question:

If you're working as long as you can to save like you'll be on your own tomorrow how on earth are you supposed to live each day like it might be your last??
For the record, I would like to state this article was posted on Yahoo Finance a long time ago and I always read them with a grain of salt.

I found it amusing in these articles are geared to convince people to ensure one has enough money in retirement. It's also amusing the last two statements contradict one another.

Each person must decide for themselves what is best for them. I don't advocate working until your health starts to fail nor be frivilous in throwing one's money away so one cannot support a comfortable lifestyle.

One's health is what's most important and having enough money to support the lifestyle one wants to live in.

Striking a balance is what they are hinting at. IMHO Posting the entire article would have been a better idea.

I've been rich and poor and being poor stinks. Mae West

Just sayin...... Not to be critical.

Last edited by 2BNTV; 07-21-2011 at 01:01 PM. Reason: additional comment
  #44  
Old 07-21-2011, 02:13 PM
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ALL of the things being mentioned are valid - they're all important: health/appropriate medical care, income/savings to support you, and so on. The risks people are willing to take and what priorities they place on things are where the balances take place. What makes sense for one person might seem completely illogical to someone else.

You can run all the math/spreadsheets and so on for these things but they're all predicated on assumptions: how long will I be in good health, will I need long term care, how long will I live, how much will the cost of living go up over time, should I start taking my social security as soon as I can, will Medicare still be around when I turn 65, etc. I feel the best anybody can do is be pessimistic about things (anticipate you'll live into your 90s, for example, not something like 80) and figure for somewhat of a 'worst-case' scenario (higher than anticipated inflation, for instance). Review and revise your game plan periodically.

Plan around those things and you've done about the best you can do. But most importantly: Enjoy yourself and what you have that is in your life.

Bill
  #45  
Old 07-21-2011, 02:27 PM
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As usual, excellent advice Bill.
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