When eating healthy becomes an unhealthy obsession.

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  #46  
Old 04-08-2013, 03:45 AM
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Well, I'm thin but I don't consider myself to be short. I'm about average height. My parents were taller than their parents and I grew taller than my parents. Those of you who are not tall, be thankful because tall people on average live shorer lives.

When people came here from Europe (or wherever) they grew taller and taller because they ate more and more animal protein. Being tall is good if you work for a large corporation because you'll be more likely to get promotions over those who are shorter. Not to mention the fact that women like tall men. But that's where the advantage ends. The odds are against tall people living to advanced old age. And this may be part of the reason why women usually outlive men. Women on average are shorter than men.

hmmmm
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  #47  
Old 04-08-2013, 05:11 AM
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When I was growing up, my mom was not one of those strict moms that you described above. I won't bore you with all the details but believe me, I ate my share of processed desserts, which I now will call "garbage".

Basically, I guess you could say that, as a kid, I ate the Standard American Diet (SAD). It included everything that you and others on this board would happily call "moderation". Thankfully, I survived it because I was young.

But she did draw a line when it came to stocking the refrigerator. I, as a young lad, was not in charge of stocking the refrigerator. And now, when I think back to those days, I'm glad that she was an adult with a backbone to set down some common sense rules.

Now, though I'm young at heart, I'm getting older and older and it's a whole new ball game. Whatever life is left for me, I value and want to make the most of it. And the so called "golden years" won't come from eating junk. A poor diet will only serve to hasten or bring on the degenerative diseases of aging.

Remember, it's all about risk. You can say that you and your uncle eat lots of junk and are still healthy. But disease has a way of showing up when you don't expect it, and then it's a surprise, at least it is to most people.

Hope I didn't bore anyone!
You would be interested in Dr. Michael Mosley's PBS documentary.

We watched it early this morning while having our coffee....
(normally we watch our recording of the Amazing Race, but it wasn't on last evening).......

PBS documentary was about fasting........quite interesting study. He tested fasting on himself with life changing results. His next segment will be on exercise...........this is all in relationship to aging. His own aging.

One of the contributors to the show explained how very very short people (in Ecuador I believe) never get cancer or other life threatening ills that befall modern society. They are extremely short.

You never answered my query as to whether you are male or female.
Now I see you are a lad. Or, were a lad as a youth.

http://www.wtvp.org/headlines/13.03....ael_mosley.asp

http://www.pbs.org/program/michael-mosley/
  #48  
Old 04-08-2013, 04:26 PM
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You would be interested in Dr. Michael Mosley's PBS documentary.

We watched it early this morning while having our coffee....
(normally we watch our recording of the Amazing Race, but it wasn't on last evening).......

PBS documentary was about fasting........quite interesting study. He tested fasting on himself with life changing results. His next segment will be on exercise...........this is all in relationship to aging. His own aging.

One of the contributors to the show explained how very very short people (in Ecuador I believe) never get cancer or other life threatening ills that befall modern society. They are extremely short.

You never answered my query as to whether you are male or female.
Now I see you are a lad. Or, were a lad as a youth.

WTVP - Headlines - Health-Focused Science Series with Dr. Michael Mosley on WTVP

Michael Mosley | PBS
I read part of your first link and fasting is not an option for me because I'm already at my lowest ideal weight. If I fast, I will become underweight.

I like the Mosley idea of self experimentation though. I just did it. My last blood test indicated a slow thyroid (TSH 8.88 hypothyroidism). I got busy, bought a book, and did lots of research on the subject. Then I decided to make about 4 changes in my diet. This was after my doctor said that diet had nothing to do with it. Some of the changes are complicated to explain so I won't go into the reasoning for the changes. 1) I lowered my B12 supplement 2) I started using some iodized salt 3) I started using less beans 4) I stopped eating raw cauliflower and broccoli (I cook them now.) And there were a few other minor changes.

When I went back to get retested, my results came back perfect.

It's possible that the first test was a lab error but I kind of doubt it. That's the problem with testing. You don't get unlimited tries at it. To be scientific, I would have needed to get retested with no changes in my diet. Then if the result was the same, I could have set about making the changes. Anyway, I'm satisfied that the changes were good and will continue them.

I believe lots of conditions can be changed for the better if people would just put in the effort.
  #49  
Old 04-08-2013, 04:50 PM
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Interesting thread ! I guess I am a little obsessed with eating healthy but am unable to increase my weight of 115# by doing so. Lactose intolerant and gluten intolerant restricts my diet and my obsession with avoiding processed food is another hindrance.

I tried to maintain an anti-inflammatory diet but now have a shoulder inflammation/impingement !! So I'm not so confident anymore about what's healthy or not.
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  #50  
Old 04-08-2013, 06:15 PM
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I believe lots of conditions can be changed for the better if people would just put in the effort.
That's the problem, the Dr's tells the patient, oh yea you show XYZ on your tests, take this drug that will fix it.

So we became a pill popping society in a way. The hell with the drug side effects.

High cholesterol, sugar, blood pressure no problem take these 99 drugs and keep the same lifestyle you like........until U wind up in ER or looking at the wrong side of the grass.

Not saying there no place for drugs, but a diet & exercise program can beat so many things, to say nothing about the number of folks here carrying an extra 50lbs +++++ DIET can go long way I'm not saying just vegan there other choices (not as good) but will help.

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  #51  
Old 04-09-2013, 09:04 PM
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Default More on little known Orthorexia

I just re read your above post as I honestly know people who fit this profile, Gracie. This was a good find on your part. We knew a brilliant young woman who attended an engineering university but who though stick thin would ask the waitress for just a "cup of hot water" when we'd take her out for dinner.......the waitress would ask, "You want a teabag with that hot water, right?" and she would respond, "No, too many calories". "Just hot water will be fine". She ate very little but when she did it was raw whole vegetables for the most part. No meat, no dairy.
She was skeletal. Her older sister only ate "rice cakes"...which are dry.

See below for more.......

Orthorexia ? A Little Known Eating Disorder - Facts on Eating-disorder.com

Weighing The Facts: Orthorexia: Fixation On Righteous Eating

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthorexia_nervosa

http://www.orthorexia.info/index.html
  #52  
Old 04-28-2013, 03:58 PM
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Some people seem to feel most comfortable rejecting almost everything and some of us want too much of everything. We're a funny bunch, no?
  #53  
Old 04-29-2013, 04:19 PM
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I often wonder if you have children.

When I taught we would have what I called "food moms" who would not allow their child to have sweets when they were sent in for holiday parties. or requested...STRONGLY that holiday parties have snacks like carrots or fruit.

I always knew the food moms loved their children deeply but I always thought that if they allowed a child an occasional sugar treat it would not kill them. Obviously for children with juvenile diabetes, it was a much easier plan. We just didn't have sugary treats EVER...and the same for peanut allergies.

I was faced with deciding if we should not have any food treats at parties, or have only healthy ones which aren't all that ....um...festive.

When I had a food mom which was not every year....I would just say no treats. It was too hard to watch the child who couldn't have the iced pumpkin cookie eat his packet of raisins. Remember, I taught five and six year olds.

We all survived. I wonder what happened to the little ones whose moms were so strict about food?

Were you young enough to be in my class Villages Pl?
As long as we are all telling our favorite stories, I just thought of a good one. This was when I was in fourth grade. My mother always made me the best sandwiches, as far as I was concerned. (Back then, in 1950, it seems that most sandwiches were made with white bread because no one knew any better.) She would make extra food for dinner and use the excess for lunches. For example, if we had meatloaf for dinner, we would have meatloaf sandwiches for lunch the next day. Chicken for dinner would yield chicken sandwiches for lunch the next day. And my sandwiches alway contained lettuce and tomatoe slices. I was very happy with it.

There was a kid who sat in front of me in class who always got the same thing every day. It was peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. And he kept begging me to trade with him. But, somehow, I knew better. I didn't think jelly was a good lunch. So I said no. When I told my mother, she said I did the right thing by not trading with him. She thought the same as I did that jelly should not be part of a good lunch. She always included a piece of fresh fruit in my lunch rather than cookies, like some of the others had. But did I feel deprived? No! I liked my lunch just the way it was. And I think it was because she took the time to explain the value of a healthy lunch. (At any rate, it was considered healthy at that time, by 1950 standards.)
  #54  
Old 05-01-2013, 02:12 PM
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Search: How many people affected from anorexia nervosa in the U.S.?

Answer: It is estimated that 0.6 % of adults will suffer from anorexia in their lifetime.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Search: Percentage of Overweight, Obese Americans Swells

Answer: 63.1% of Americans are overweight or obese.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Question: Of the two problems above, which is the bigger problem that we need to focus on?

P.S. I couldn't find any statistics on orthorexia. However, if it does exist, it may actually be the same as anorexia. In that case, it's nothing new.
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:34 AM
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Search: How many people affected from anorexia nervosa in the U.S.?
Answer: It is estimated that 0.6 % of adults will suffer from anorexia in their lifetime.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Search: Percentage of Overweight, Obese Americans Swells

Answer: 63.1% of Americans are overweight or obese.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Question: Of the two problems above, which is the bigger problem that we need to focus on?
P.S. I couldn't find any statistics on orthorexia. However, if it does exist, it may actually be the same as anorexia. In that case, it's nothing new.
First things first: (short-term and long-term disease need focus)

"Anorexia is the most lethal psychiatric disorder, carrying a sixfold increased risk of death -- four times the death risk from major depression.

The odds are even worse for people first diagnosed with anorexia in their 20s. They have 18 times the death risk of healthy people their age, according to an analysis of the medical literature by Jon Arcelus, MD, PhD, of the University of Leicester, England, and colleagues.

The study found anorexia to carry twice the death risk of schizophrenia and three times the death risk of bipolar disorder. Although anorexia is by far the deadliest eating disorder, death rates are also higher than normal in people with bulimia and "eating disorder not otherwise specified" (EDNOS, a common diagnosis for people with a mixture of atypical anorexia and atypical bulimia)...."


Deadliest Psychiatric Disorder: Anorexia
  #56  
Old 05-02-2013, 11:36 AM
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First things first: (short-term and long-term disease need focus)

"Anorexia is the most lethal psychiatric disorder, carrying a sixfold increased risk of death -- four times the death risk from major depression.

The odds are even worse for people first diagnosed with anorexia in their 20s. They have 18 times the death risk of healthy people their age, according to an analysis of the medical literature by Jon Arcelus, MD, PhD, of the University of Leicester, England, and colleagues.

The study found anorexia to carry twice the death risk of schizophrenia and three times the death risk of bipolar disorder. Although anorexia is by far the deadliest eating disorder, death rates are also higher than normal in people with bulimia and "eating disorder not otherwise specified" (EDNOS, a common diagnosis for people with a mixture of atypical anorexia and atypical bulimia)...."


Deadliest Psychiatric Disorder: Anorexia
I have never doubted the high risk of death for anorexics. But I doubt that this board would have any helpful impact. First of all, where are they? I've lived in The Villages since 1999 and have only seen one person that I suspected of being anorexic. And I say "suspected" because she might have had something other than anorexia. For example, she might have had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

But assuming you could find someone with anorexia, how would you propose to be of help? Don't they need professional help? And looking at the big picture, what is the health care cost of anorexia in the U.S.? Then compare that cost with the U.S. health care cost for the overweight and obese.

That would make for an interesting comparison and might help to put things in proper perspective.
  #57  
Old 05-04-2013, 08:02 AM
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Search: How many people affected from anorexia nervosa in the U.S.?

Answer: It is estimated that 0.6 % of adults will suffer from anorexia in their lifetime.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Search: Percentage of Overweight, Obese Americans Swells

Answer: 63.1% of Americans are overweight or obese.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Question: Of the two problems above, which is the bigger problem that we need to focus on?

P.S. I couldn't find any statistics on orthorexia. However, if it does exist, it may actually be the same as anorexia. In that case, it's nothing new.
Anorexia is a "control issue".........whereas overweight is often from lack of exercise while consuming more calories than is needed for a sedentary lifestyle ....or for those who find it painful to move due to arthritis, etc.
Anorexia nervosa: Symptoms - MayoClinic.com

A true anorexic is not hard to spot , but they often wear very baggy clothes to hide their bones.......perhaps not in Florida, but definitely in the northern states.........

Orthorexia — When eating healthy goes awry - MayoClinic.com
Orthorexia When eating healthy goes awry Mayo Clinic
  #58  
Old 07-21-2013, 04:27 PM
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You have posted this link before and I have pointed out that the author herself has stated the following: "....[Orthorexia] is not yet a clinically recognized term or disorder...."

It's a bogus disease; read the following link.

http://www.rawveganradio.com/healthy...ting-disorder/
  #59  
Old 07-21-2013, 05:01 PM
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MODERATION ?????? It's an individual thing. I know myself better than anyone else and like Clint Eastwood said in his role of Dirty Harry, "a man has to know his limitations". I know I have an addictive personality and must avoid what I need to since moderation doesn't work for me. It's all or nothing. If for example I had a chocolate chip cookie I would tell myself that I already blew it so I'd have the rest of the box.
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Old 07-21-2013, 05:57 PM
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MODERATION ?????? It's an individual thing. I know myself better than anyone else and like Clint Eastwood said in his role of Dirty Harry, "a man has to know his limitations". I know I have an addictive personality and must avoid what I need to since moderation doesn't work for me. It's all or nothing. If for example I had a chocolate chip cookie I would tell myself that I already blew it so I'd have the rest of the box.
You raised a good point and I think it's the reason why close to 80% of diets fail. People have been told (promoted by the fast food industry) that they should be able to eat all their favorite foods in moderation. But it's just not realistic. Today, fast-foods are an addiction for most people and the fast food industry doesn't want that "gravy-train" to stop. If more and more people get the idea that they have to eliminate certain foods altogether, fast-food industry profits could take a big hit. So, what to do? Nip it in the bud by stigmatizing healthy eaters as being Orthorexic.
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