Foam filled blocks

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Closed Thread
Thread Tools
  #16  
Old 01-21-2020, 08:43 AM
Paula Paula is offline
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 39
Thanks: 4
Thanked 24 Times in 9 Posts
Default Foam insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by karostay View Post
Curious if anyone has had foam added to their block home ?
What were the results ? Seems logical adding extra R Value to exterior walls would make a noticeable change.
Is it worth the added cost ?
When we built, our builder from up north told us to get all the insulation we could. Just as we need it for the cold weather, we also need it for the heat. Since we were building new, we had nothing for comparison, but we also realized the necessity for insulation. If you can afford it, do it.
  #17  
Old 01-21-2020, 10:12 AM
John_W John_W is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,373
Thanks: 2,112
Thanked 2,888 Times in 1,134 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stadry View Post
...not aware there're any poured conc walls in anything down here,,, are there ? where ?
We bought a new masonry CYV in 2011. We wanted white cabinets and none the new villas on the market had them, there is no custom building of CYV's. We settled for a unit with brown cabinets and the cabinets refaced later. We were told at the time, no new villas were being built in our area because the forms were in use at Hacienda Hills (villa community by Morse Bridge). They said they had just one set of forms for each model and that when that was finished they would move back to our area. That's how I learned they were not block constructed. Then later I noticed the forms while playing golf I saw a villa community being built.
  #18  
Old 01-21-2020, 10:16 AM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is online now
Sage
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 6,443
Thanks: 663
Thanked 4,892 Times in 1,798 Posts
Default

A lot of houses were built with poured-in-place concrete walls over the last 10 years or longer. However, I understand that the builder has stopped using that method.
  #19  
Old 01-21-2020, 10:25 AM
PugMom's Avatar
PugMom PugMom is offline
Gold member
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Village of McClure
Posts: 1,060
Thanks: 5,612
Thanked 845 Times in 405 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by toeser View Post
I have been shocked by our 1996 cement-block 2,150 sq. ft. Villages home. It is the most energy efficient home I have ever owned. I consider our utility bills cheap.

The one huge improvement TV could have done, too late now, is to have insulated the water pipes. There is a huge energy waste pumping hot water through bare pipes in concrete. If I shut off the water to lather up in the shower, the water is cold again when I turn it back on and I have to heat it up all over again.
yes, same. the h20 is always cold when left sitting a bit, but i think it has to do with the heater
  #20  
Old 01-21-2020, 10:31 AM
John_W John_W is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,373
Thanks: 2,112
Thanked 2,888 Times in 1,134 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
A lot of houses were built with poured-in-place concrete walls over the last 10 years or longer. However, I understand that the builder has stopped using that method.
In 2011-2012 I only know that CYV's were built with forms. Around our villas is Odessa Circle, 80 designer homes that front on Southern Star executive. I walked the circle everyday for exercise, it's 7/10 of a mile around. I probably saw 60 of the 80 homes built, and everyone was concrete block. Usually you see an empty lot and then about 10 cars are parked on the street. They have about 20 workers laying block and entire designer home will go up in less than 2 days. There was maybe only about 5 that were framed built. Whether they still use forms for CYVs today, someone in the new areas could check that out.
  #21  
Old 01-21-2020, 10:34 AM
ton80 ton80 is offline
Junior Member
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 33 Times in 10 Posts
Default

I agree with VT and other posters that say the savings for adding foam to block wall cavities post construction would not justify the expense. Listed below are some generalities for Florida power consumption for a home with electric power Heating and air conditioning.
Power Consumption
Heating and air conditioning 37%
Appliances and electric lights 50%
Hot water 13%

Your annual electric bill would be about 1000$ (CYV) to 2000$( large Designer) is my guesstimate based on owning houses in TV. Mr. Toymeister may have more precise data.
Your maximum savings would be maybe 1/3 of your Heat & AC cost since much of the solar heat gain in summer and heat loss in winter is through the windows and air infiltration. That savings of ~13% yields a savings of 130 to 260$ per year. Even if you saved it all, there is no way to justify adding foam to the block wall cavities after construction. You would need to drill a hole through your exterior stucco wall every 4 inches or so, inject expanding foam, then patch the holes, and finally repaint your house. Repainting alone is probably 2 to 3000$

Other sources indicate that the current TV block wall design has an R value of about 10.
Concrete block with air voids 2 to 2.5
3/4 inch foam fastened to inside of wall 5
sheetrock and airspace 2.2

Total R 9.2 to 9.7

Your double pane windows have an R value of 3 to 3.7 for comparison.

Other Comments
Solid concrete is a good conductor of both heat and sound. Not good for heat savings or reducing sound.
Heat saving and sound deadening materials are generally lighter and similar in nature foam, wall coverings, special batting installed with separations to reduce sound transmitted through the structure.
  #22  
Old 01-21-2020, 11:25 AM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is online now
Sage
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 6,443
Thanks: 663
Thanked 4,892 Times in 1,798 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ton80 View Post
I agree with VT and other posters that say the savings for adding foam to block wall cavities post construction would not justify the expense. Listed below are some generalities for Florida power consumption for a home with electric power Heating and air conditioning.
Power Consumption
Heating and air conditioning 37%
Appliances and electric lights 50%
Hot water 13%

Your annual electric bill would be about 1000$ (CYV) to 2000$( large Designer) is my guesstimate based on owning houses in TV. Mr. Toymeister may have more precise data.
Your maximum savings would be maybe 1/3 of your Heat & AC cost since much of the solar heat gain in summer and heat loss in winter is through the windows and air infiltration. That savings of ~13% yields a savings of 130 to 260$ per year. Even if you saved it all, there is no way to justify adding foam to the block wall cavities after construction. You would need to drill a hole through your exterior stucco wall every 4 inches or so, inject expanding foam, then patch the holes, and finally repaint your house. Repainting alone is probably 2 to 3000$

Other sources indicate that the current TV block wall design has an R value of about 10.
Concrete block with air voids 2 to 2.5
3/4 inch foam fastened to inside of wall 5
sheetrock and airspace 2.2

Total R 9.2 to 9.7

Your double pane windows have an R value of 3 to 3.7 for comparison.

Other Comments
Solid concrete is a good conductor of both heat and sound. Not good for heat savings or reducing sound.
Heat saving and sound deadening materials are generally lighter and similar in nature foam, wall coverings, special batting installed with separations to reduce sound transmitted through the structure.
I somewhat disagree that concrete is a good conductor of sound. Nothing is completely soundproof. Sound is produced by an air pressure wave that vibrates your eardrum. There are 2 ways that sound can be transmitted through an exterior wall. (1) There can be air gaps in the wall that allows the air pressure wave to flow directly through the wall to your eardrum. Or, (2) The air pressure wave outside can actually vibrate the entire wall allowing the inside wall surface to replicate the air pressure wave inside the house and cause your eardrum to vibrate. Solid concrete is pretty much air tight, and it is dense, which makes it difficult to vibrate.
  #23  
Old 01-21-2020, 02:00 PM
ChaRobPhe ChaRobPhe is offline
Junior Member
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 3
Thanks: 5
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Had foam trim on house in West Palm Beach. Had to get rid of it. The Woodpeckers love it! No sooner would get one hole filled up and there would be three more.

Last edited by ChaRobPhe; 01-21-2020 at 02:09 PM.
  #24  
Old 01-21-2020, 02:51 PM
ton80 ton80 is offline
Junior Member
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 28
Thanks: 0
Thanked 33 Times in 10 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
I somewhat disagree that concrete is a good conductor of sound. Nothing is completely soundproof. Sound is produced by an air pressure wave that vibrates your eardrum. There are 2 ways that sound can be transmitted through an exterior wall. (1) There can be air gaps in the wall that allows the air pressure wave to flow directly through the wall to your eardrum. Or, (2) The air pressure wave outside can actually vibrate the entire wall allowing the inside wall surface to replicate the air pressure wave inside the house and cause your eardrum to vibrate. Solid concrete is pretty much air tight, and it is dense, which makes it difficult to vibrate.
Thanks for your comment. Let me clarify my answer as well. Concrete reflects sound. It is a good sound barrier against airborne noise (example: highway sound barriers) but is a good conductor of impact noise. Example a person walking down the concrete floor with hard heels/cleats creates a racket in the hall, which can be transmitted through the concrete to the room below if that room has no sound reducing barriers or material on its ceiling. However, a person on the other side of the concrete wall in the hallway does not hear much since the concrete wall reflected the sound back to the source adding to the racket.
This explains to me what John W related. In his room with stereo on loud the sound was absorbed/reduced by the combination of the drywall and the foam insulation inside of the house. Any residual noise was reflected back by the exterior concrete wall inside towards the stereo resulting in minimal sound reaching the outside. The sound absorbing materials kept the room sound acceptable.
  #25  
Old 01-21-2020, 03:03 PM
retiredguy123 retiredguy123 is online now
Sage
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 6,443
Thanks: 663
Thanked 4,892 Times in 1,798 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ton80 View Post
Thanks for your comment. Let me clarify my answer as well. Concrete reflects sound. It is a good sound barrier against airborne noise (example: highway sound barriers) but is a good conductor of impact noise. Example a person walking down the concrete floor with hard heels/cleats creates a racket in the hall, which can be transmitted through the concrete to the room below if that room has no sound reducing barriers or material on its ceiling. However, a person on the other side of the concrete wall in the hallway does not hear much since the concrete wall reflected the sound back to the source adding to the racket.
This explains to me what John W related. In his room with stereo on loud the sound was absorbed/reduced by the combination of the drywall and the foam insulation inside of the house. Any residual noise was reflected back by the exterior concrete wall inside towards the stereo resulting in minimal sound reaching the outside. The sound absorbing materials kept the room sound acceptable.
I agree that reflecting noise back into a room is different from preventing noise from transmitting through a wall. I think John was talking about how the noise did not penetrate through the exterior wall to the outside. But, all noise is airborne. If you lived in a vacuum, you would not hear anything.
  #26  
Old 01-21-2020, 04:23 PM
karostay's Avatar
karostay karostay is offline
Sage
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Conn/Maine /
Posts: 2,698
Thanks: 106
Thanked 1,261 Times in 479 Posts
Default

Train has been derailed
__________________
Don't take life Too Serious ..It isn't permanent
  #27  
Old 01-21-2020, 05:17 PM
Shimpy's Avatar
Shimpy Shimpy is offline
Sage
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,697
Thanks: 3
Thanked 16 Times in 11 Posts
Default insulation

This is the first home I've had that is NOT block but frame and got to say the best insulated. I grew up in south Florida and all the homes were block. This frame house now is like a thermos bottle. When it gets cold inside it stays that way for days when it warms up outside.
__________________
Les
  #28  
Old 01-21-2020, 07:39 PM
mark47 mark47 is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 48
Thanks: 2
Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post
Default

Just to offer another thought over 20 years ago I was involved with building two homes in Sarasota that used foam blocks that were to be filled with cement. A new concept that I don't think caught on. It was interesting to watch. Don't know costs or if it was worth it.
  #29  
Old 01-22-2020, 05:54 AM
stadry stadry is offline
Senior Member
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: atl (marietta) - 1/20 bought on killington loop then covoid hit - looking again
Posts: 321
Thanks: 137
Thanked 222 Times in 108 Posts
Default

how long can it take to lather up ? either its extremely hard water, you're a larger-than-most specimen, or need a new bar of soap,,, usual ambient ground water temp is ( guessing ) abut 65f under your slab/in the ground,,, that may feel cold when sprayed on our skin.
not aware of insulated water supply lines anywhere in the world,,, there MAY be some foam where the wtr pipe enters your very fine home in the slab penetration but, other than that, as someone else said, insulating water lines would be a difficult as smelling the # 9
we built several structures using icf's ( insulated concrete forms ) [ think of a cmu only styrofoam ] what a TERRIFIC product - quiet, insulated, solid, almost hurricane-proof,,, addl cost amortization over stick-build was 18% ( 5yr payback ),,, as bldr efficiency increased, that cost adjusted to 22%,,, believe there's a 12story bldg in miami of icf's

Last edited by stadry; 01-22-2020 at 06:01 AM.
  #30  
Old 01-22-2020, 08:52 AM
E Cascade E Cascade is offline
Member
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 68
Thanks: 0
Thanked 33 Times in 20 Posts
Default

Has anyone moved their hot water heater to an indoor closet.....closer to the bathrooms?
Closed Thread

Tags
foam, added, exterior, worth, cost

Thread Tools

You are viewing a new design of the TOTV site. Click here to revert to the old version.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:20 PM.