Hot water issues

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Closed Thread
Thread Tools
  #31  
Old 12-22-2019, 05:44 PM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
Sage
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Bailed out of NJ after 68yrs and headed south.
Posts: 2,537
Thanks: 532
Thanked 1,398 Times in 574 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by champion6 View Post
The pipes in the attic could be for natural gas.
OK, we were discussing water. I don't know about gas (don't have it here) but why would even gas pipes go into the attic ? I would think that would add a lot more piping. Wouldn't they go through the walls on a single level home? That's how it was up north but our home was 60+ years old so it could be different now.
  #32  
Old 12-22-2019, 05:58 PM
rjm1cc's Avatar
rjm1cc rjm1cc is offline
Platinum member
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,975
Thanks: 51
Thanked 186 Times in 70 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EdFNJ View Post
OK, we were discussing water. I don't know about gas (don't have it here) but why would even gas pipes go into the attic ? I would think that would add a lot more piping. Wouldn't they go through the walls on a single level home? That's how it was up north but our home was 60+ years old so it could be different now.
Good question but they do go through the attic. Maybe a building code?
  #33  
Old 12-22-2019, 06:02 PM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
Sage
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Bailed out of NJ after 68yrs and headed south.
Posts: 2,537
Thanks: 532
Thanked 1,398 Times in 574 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckcapaul View Post
And the additional cost of keeping that recirculating water hot
Just put a meter on ours. Drawing 24 watts & .025KWH and it only runs 7 hours a day. I think that is one of the least reasons to not have one. Made a major difference and cost PENNIES to run since it only runs a few hours a day (has a timer on it).

I put it in myself. Took around 45 minutes including 2 bathroom breaks. Plastic pipe is a breeze. $10 parts including glue. Can't imagine why they would charge $300 to install one UNLESS ELECTRIC OUTLET IS NEEDED so you'd have to pay electrician. We had outlet very close. Yea, I could live without it but I chose not to. Since I don't smoke or drink I figure all the money I save made it affordable and my wife happy.
  #34  
Old 12-22-2019, 07:25 PM
Robbie0723 Robbie0723 is offline
Veteran member
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 688
Thanks: 475
Thanked 367 Times in 173 Posts
Default

For those looking to build new, there are tankless water heaters with a built-in recirculation system. They require a separate return line. May be worth the upgrade cost.
  #35  
Old 12-22-2019, 07:34 PM
Marathon Man Marathon Man is offline
Gold member
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 1,459
Thanks: 2
Thanked 1,022 Times in 390 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EdFNJ View Post
Just put a meter on ours. Drawing 24 watts & .025KWH and it only runs 7 hours a day. I think that is one of the least reasons to not have one. Made a major difference and cost PENNIES to run since it only runs a few hours a day (has a timer on it).
Have you measured the increased energy used to constanly re-heat the water in the pipes?
  #36  
Old 12-22-2019, 07:39 PM
ckcapaul ckcapaul is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Woodbury
Posts: 95
Thanks: 16
Thanked 52 Times in 25 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EdFNJ View Post
Just put a meter on ours. Drawing 24 watts & .025KWH and it only runs 7 hours a day. I think that is one of the least reasons to not have one. Made a major difference and cost PENNIES to run since it only runs a few hours a day (has a timer on it).

I put it in myself. Took around 45 minutes including 2 bathroom breaks. Plastic pipe is a breeze. $10 parts including glue. Can't imagine why they would charge $300 to install one UNLESS ELECTRIC OUTLET IS NEEDED so you'd have to pay electrician. We had outlet very close. Yea, I could live without it but I chose not to. Since I don't smoke or drink I figure all the money I save made it affordable and my wife happy.
Wife happy is worth any cost
  #37  
Old 12-22-2019, 09:36 PM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
Sage
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Bailed out of NJ after 68yrs and headed south.
Posts: 2,537
Thanks: 532
Thanked 1,398 Times in 574 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marathon Man View Post
Have you measured the increased energy used to constanly re-heat the water in the pipes?
It's not CONSTANTLY running (its timer is on about 7hrs a day) so it isn't constantly reheating and I honestly have no idea and truly don't care even if it cost $10/month to run which I'm sure it doesn't. I also don't always turn off the lights and I keep the A/C running even when it's 60 outside and always buy name brand peanut butter !!!
  #38  
Old 12-22-2019, 10:26 PM
rjm1cc's Avatar
rjm1cc rjm1cc is offline
Platinum member
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,975
Thanks: 51
Thanked 186 Times in 70 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robbie0723 View Post
For those looking to build new, there are tankless water heaters with a built-in recirculation system. They require a separate return line. May be worth the upgrade cost.
The separate return line is a good idea. The reason is that the pumps we are discussing use the cold water line to return the water to the hot water heater. Thus you lose cold water if you run the pump a lot.
  #39  
Old 12-22-2019, 11:31 PM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
Sage
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Bailed out of NJ after 68yrs and headed south.
Posts: 2,537
Thanks: 532
Thanked 1,398 Times in 574 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjm1cc View Post
The separate return line is a good idea. The reason is that the pumps we are discussing use the cold water line to return the water to the hot water heater. Thus you lose cold water if you run the pump a lot.
Everyone mentions that when discussing the $175 recirc pump but you really don't "lose" cold water when you run the pump. It's just a little bit warmer for about 20 seconds when you first turn it on then the cold goes to normal. Not very noticeable on those hot summer days when the water is warm anyway. A return line would solve that but it's close to impossible around here. Will they do that in new construction ?

We had a Navien Gas Tankless HWH up north and REALLY miss that. Expensive as hell but it was great never running out of hot water and it was hot on demand. They claimed it didn't need a return line but it did and we installed one as there was easy access to all the water pipes. Sad part was we sold our home less than 2yrs after installing it. We certainly didn't get it to save on gas costs.
  #40  
Old 12-23-2019, 12:02 AM
Robbie0723 Robbie0723 is offline
Veteran member
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 688
Thanks: 475
Thanked 367 Times in 173 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjm1cc View Post
The separate return line is a good idea. The reason is that the pumps we are discussing use the cold water line to return the water to the hot water heater. Thus you lose cold water if you run the pump a lot.
Some tankless manufactures reduce the warranty if you use a recirc pump because of the increased usage.

Units with a return line have a recirc pump built in and are designed for higher usage.
  #41  
Old 12-23-2019, 11:27 AM
Kountry Kountry is offline
Junior Member
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: the villages fl
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Yes I have the same problem. It seems a shame to waste water. My house is 6 years old and the hot water heater is in a bedroom walk in closet and about25 feet from kitchen and 35 to front bathroom.
  #42  
Old 12-30-2019, 01:23 PM
mulligan mulligan is offline
Sage
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,830
Thanks: 8
Thanked 145 Times in 73 Posts
Default

Because I really enjoy throwing a new monkey wrench into any conversation, they (electric appliance mfgrs.) also make a point of use heater that can be plugged in under the sink. It's smaller than a toaster, and uses 110v circuit. Probably not the most efficient heater. but if there was one at the kitchen sink, and the master bath sink, the problem would not be so invasive.
__________________
........American by birth....Union by choice
  #43  
Old 12-31-2019, 08:53 AM
Carla B Carla B is offline
Soaring Eagle member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,119
Thanks: 20
Thanked 244 Times in 111 Posts
Default

Husband installed our Watts recirculating pump about five years ago. He put a timer on the wall by the entrance to the walk-in shower, so the pump is on only when using the shower. At the same time in the master bath he put in a wall heater with timer. This system supplies a lot of comfort during the cool months at minimal cost.
Closed Thread

Tags
water, hot, problem, bath, garage

Thread Tools

You are viewing a new design of the TOTV site. Click here to revert to the old version.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:07 PM.