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  #31  
Old 03-31-2020, 08:10 AM
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Of the 800,000+ cases in the world, 95% are classified as “mild” and the number of recovered is up to 172,000+.

A 95 year old woman and 101 year old man in Italy recently recovered!

Don’t lose hope!
  #32  
Old 03-31-2020, 11:28 AM
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From theodysseyonline.com:


There are already prototypes of vaccines

Our ability to design new vaccines is spectacular. There are already more than eight projects against the new coronavirus. There are groups that work on vaccine projects against other similar viruses and now try to change viruses.

What can lengthen its development are all the necessary tests of toxicity, side effects, safety, immunogenicity and effectiveness in protection. Therefore, there are several months or years, but some prototypes are already underway.

For example, the mRNA-1273 vaccine from Moderna consists of a messenger RNA fragment that encodes a protein derived from the glycoprotein S of the coronavirus surface. This company has similar prototypes for other viruses.

Inovio Pharmaceuticals has announced a synthetic DNA vaccine for the new coronavirus, INO-4800, also based on the S gene of the virus surface. For its part, Sanofi will use its recombinant baculovirus expression platform to produce large amounts of the surface antigen of the new coronavirus.

The vaccine group of the University of Queensland, in Australia, has announced that it is already working on a prototype using the technique called a molecular clamp, a novel technology that consists of creating chimeric molecules capable of maintaining the original three-dimensional structure of the viral antigen. This allows producing vaccines using the genome of the virus in record time.

Novavax is another biotechnology company that has announced its work with the coronavirus. It has a technology to produce recombinant proteins that are assembled into nanoparticles and that, with their own adjuvant, are potent immunogens.

In Spain, it is the group of Luis Enjuanes and Isabel Sola of the CNB-CSIC who have been working on vaccines against coronaviruses for years.

Some of these prototypes will soon be tested in humans.

There are more than 80 clinical trials with antivirals in progress

Vaccines are preventive. More important are the possible treatments of people who are already sick. There are already more than 80 clinical trials to analyze coronavirus treatments. These are antivirals that have been used for other infections, which are already approved and that we know are safe.

One of those that has already been tested in humans is redelivered, a broad-spectrum antiviral, still under study, which has been tested against Ebola and SARS / MERS. It is an analog of adenosine that is incorporated into the viral RNA chain and inhibits its replication.

Another candidate is chloroquine, an antimalarial that also has a potent antiviral activity. It is known to block the infection by increasing the pH of the endosome that is needed for the fusion of the virus with the cell, which inhibits its entry. It has been proven that this compound blocks the new coronavirus in vitro and is already being used in patients who have caused the virus pneumonia.

Lopinavir and Ritonavir are two protease inhibitors used as antiretroviral therapy that inhibit the final maturation of the AIDS virus. As the SARSCov2 protease has been shown to be similar to that of HIV, this combination has already been tested in patients with the coronavirus.

Other proposed trials are based on the use of oseltamivir (a neuraminidase inhibitor used against influenza virus), interferon-1b (protein with antiviral function), antisera from already recovered people and monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the virus. Even new therapies with inhibitory substances, such as baricitinibin, have been suggested by artificial intelligence.

The 1918 flu pandemic caused more than 25 million deaths in less than 25 weeks. Could something similar happen again today? As we see, most likely not. We have never been better prepared to fight a pandemic.
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  #33  
Old 03-31-2020, 12:25 PM
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BBC America is airing calming nature documentaries two days a week.

The network is also launching a companion website, Wonderstrucktv.com, that will serve up free shortform nature-related content specifically designed to help lessen anxiety. No cable subscription, log-in, or registration is required to view the shortform content.
  #34  
Old 04-09-2020, 03:34 PM
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USAA auto insurance will be rebating 20% of two month's worth of premiums to all members, for a total of $520M.

"We're able to pass on these savings because your efforts to stay home have meant fewer drivers on the road and fewer accidents/claims."
  #35  
Old 04-09-2020, 04:46 PM
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OK, I have some things I'm trying to do at home to relieve the boredom.

1. Today, I tried to make Hand Sanitizer. It came out as Jello Shots.
2. I put liquor bottles in every room. Tonight, I'm getting all dressed up and going Bar hopping.
3. Struck up a conversation with a Spider today. Seems nice. He's a web designer.
4. Watched the birds fight over a worm. The Cardinals led the Blue Jays 3-1.
5.If you keep a glass of wine in each hand, you can't accidentally touch your face.
6. I realized why dogs get so excited about something moving outside, going for walks or car rides. I think I just barked at a squirrel.
7 I get to take the Garbage out. I'm so excited, I can't decide what to wear.


Stay safe everyone.

Last edited by bilcon; 04-09-2020 at 04:48 PM. Reason: typo
  #36  
Old 04-09-2020, 05:18 PM
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Rotary Club of the Villages (Morning)

Contributions over the last 10 days

Various local child care agencies $3000
Four local food banks 3500
Salvation Army (Feeding, housing
and buying medicine) 3000

More, a lot more to come

Want to help? PM me
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  #37  
Old 04-09-2020, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bilcon View Post
OK, I have some things I'm trying to do at home to relieve the boredom.

1. Today, I tried to make Hand Sanitizer. It came out as Jello Shots.
2. I put liquor bottles in every room. Tonight, I'm getting all dressed up and going Bar hopping.
3. Struck up a conversation with a Spider today. Seems nice. He's a web designer.
4. Watched the birds fight over a worm. The Cardinals led the Blue Jays 3-1.
5.If you keep a glass of wine in each hand, you can't accidentally touch your face.
6. I realized why dogs get so excited about something moving outside, going for walks or car rides. I think I just barked at a squirrel.
7 I get to take the Garbage out. I'm so excited, I can't decide what to wear.


Stay safe everyone.
Short version - not a copy from the internet: Did you know I have 59 different "screw in" type light bulbs in my house. Tomorrow I plan to classify them by wattage, socket type, shape, color (warm white cool white etc), led vs incandescent, etc. Will be a valuable asset to the next owner.
  #38  
Old 04-10-2020, 07:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rustyp View Post
Short version - not a copy from the internet: Did you know I have 59 different "screw in" type light bulbs in my house. Tomorrow I plan to classify them by wattage, socket type, shape, color (warm white cool white etc), led vs incandescent, etc. Will be a valuable asset to the next owner.

Hi rustyp, your post reminded me of a discussion here on TOTV, months ago:

Which way should the screws in electrical plates be turned? Should they be horizontal or vertical? You might want to check yours while you are cataloging those light bulbs.

I had never thought about the turning of the screw before, but I soon learned that opinions are definite and opposing.

As I thought it through, I realized that willy-nilly screws are fine with me, as long as the switchplates stay on the wall.

Even though, at that time, nobody called me names for that liberal thinking, I bet if the screw direction topic came around again, it would devolve into a knock-down-drag-out.

(Thanks for the thread rustyp. I am not worried about opening this one and ruining my morning. )

Last edited by Boomer; 04-10-2020 at 07:37 AM. Reason: Typo
  #39  
Old 04-10-2020, 01:06 PM
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Forgot to post this feel good moment some of us were fortunate to see Wed afternoon. I heard the boom boom boom like those cars with 10000 watts of bass going by. Looked out the window and a red pickup truck pulling a trailer was going by. In the trailer was a singer doing the Karaoke thing with some very impressive equipment. They stopped and performed a couple songs. No name of who but very talented. It was amazing how many golf carts stopped (and also kept their social distance) and some started dancing in the street. Lots of smiles and applause.
  #40  
Old 04-10-2020, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer View Post
Hi rustyp, your post reminded me of a discussion here on TOTV, months ago:

Which way should the screws in electrical plates be turned? Should they be horizontal or vertical? You might want to check yours while you are cataloging those light bulbs.

I had never thought about the turning of the screw before, but I soon learned that opinions are definite and opposing.

As I thought it through, I realized that willy-nilly screws are fine with me, as long as the switchplates stay on the wall.

Even though, at that time, nobody called me names for that liberal thinking, I bet if the screw direction topic came around again, it would devolve into a knock-down-drag-out.

(Thanks for the thread rustyp. I am not worried about opening this one and ruining my morning. )
Screws are without a doubt East to West! Make certain the Wall Plate is Perfectly Square!
Any identification letters or numbers on a light bulb on the base of the bulb or the top of the bulb must face the wall!

I just checked all of ours and everything is in order!
  #41  
Old 04-10-2020, 02:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer View Post
Hi rustyp, your post reminded me of a discussion here on TOTV, months ago:

Which way should the screws in electrical plates be turned? Should they be horizontal or vertical? You might want to check yours while you are cataloging those light bulbs.

I had never thought about the turning of the screw before, but I soon learned that opinions are definite and opposing.

As I thought it through, I realized that willy-nilly screws are fine with me, as long as the switchplates stay on the wall.

Even though, at that time, nobody called me names for that liberal thinking, I bet if the screw direction topic came around again, it would devolve into a knock-down-drag-out.

(Thanks for the thread rustyp. I am not worried about opening this one and ruining my morning. )


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nucky View Post
Screws are without a doubt East to West! Make certain the Wall Plate is Perfectly Square!
Any identification letters or numbers on a light bulb on the base of the bulb or the top of the bulb must face the wall!

I just checked all of ours and everything is in order!
Oh, Nucky, Nucky, Nucky,

How well I remember how you dug in your heels on that one. I can see you have not mellowed.

On a different note, I just read that Andrea Bocelli will be broadcasting a solo concert titled “Music for Hope” from Milan’s cathedral, Duomo di Milano, on Easter. He will be alone in the cathedral except for an accompanist.

Bocelli’s voice is awesome —in the true sense of the word. When he sings in Italian, I cannot translate the actual words, but hearing him sing them always makes me cry. (I react the same way when I listen to Pavarotti.)

We plan to listen on Sunday when Bocelli shares his gift with the world, streaming on YouTube.

Last edited by Boomer; 04-10-2020 at 02:15 PM.
  #42  
Old 04-11-2020, 03:19 PM
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The locals in this town have solved the Easter Service Social Distance Problem. They have moved the service from inside the church to the Drive In Movie Theater.

easter-service-jpg

Last edited by rustyp; 04-12-2020 at 06:03 AM.
  #43  
Old 04-11-2020, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nucky View Post
Screws are without a doubt East to West! Make certain the Wall Plate is Perfectly Square!
Any identification letters or numbers on a light bulb on the base of the bulb or the top of the bulb must face the wall!

I just checked all of ours and everything is in order!
No Way!
North to South is the proven correct position.
  #44  
Old 04-19-2020, 09:55 AM
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Covid-19 may not be as contagious as some might think.

Here's a copy and paste from the 4/18/20 NY Times article:
ASK WELL

Is the Virus on My Clothes? My Shoes? My Hair? My Newspaper?
We asked the experts to answer questions about all the places coronavirus lurks (or doesn’t). You’ll feel better after reading this.



Credit...iStock
Tara Parker-Pope
By Tara Parker-Pope
Published April 17, 2020
Updated April 18, 2020


When we asked readers to send their questions about coronavirus, a common theme emerged: Many people are fearful about tracking the virus into their homes on their clothes, their shoes, the mail and even the newspaper.

We reached out to infectious disease experts, aerosol scientists and microbiologists to answer reader questions about the risks of coming into contact with the virus during essential trips outside and from deliveries. While we still need to take precautions, their answers were reassuring.

Should I change my clothes and shower when I come home from the grocery store?
For most of us who are practicing social distancing and making only occasional trips to the grocery store or pharmacy, experts agree that it’s not necessary to change clothes or take a shower when you return home. You should, however, always wash your hands. While it’s true that a sneeze or cough from an infected person can propel viral droplets and smaller particles through the air, most of them will drop to the ground.

Studies show that some small viral particles could float in the air for about half an hour, but they don’t swarm like gnats and are unlikely to collide with your clothes. “A droplet that is small enough to float in air for a while also is unlikely to deposit on clothing because of aerodynamics,” said Linsey Marr, an aerosol scientist at Virginia Tech. “The droplets are small enough that they’ll move in the air around your body and clothing.”

Why is it that small droplets and viral particles don’t typically land on our clothing?
I asked Dr. Marr to explain further, since we’re all getting a mini lesson in aerodynamics.

“The best way to describe it is that they follow the streamlines, or air flow, around a person, because we move relatively slowly. It’s kind of like small insects and dust particles flowing in the streamlines around a car at slow speed but potentially slamming into the windshield if the car is going fast enough,” said Dr. Marr.

“Humans don’t usually move fast enough for this to happen,” Dr. Marr continued. “As we move, we push air out of the way, and most of the droplets and particles get pushed out of the way, too. Someone would have to spray large droplets through talking — a spit talker — coughing or sneezing for them to land on our clothes. The droplets have to be large enough that they don’t follow the streamlines.”


So, if you’re out shopping and somebody sneezes on you, you probably do want to go home, change and shower. But the rest of the time, take comfort that your slow-moving body is pushing air and viral particles away from your clothes, a result of simple physics.



Is there a risk that the virus could be in my hair or beard?
For all the reasons outlined above, you should not be worried about viral contamination of your hair or beard if you are practicing social distancing. Even if someone sneezed on the back of your head, any droplets that landed on your hair would be an unlikely source of infection.

“You have to think through the process of what would have to happen for someone to become infected,” said Dr. Andrew Janowski, instructor of pediatric infectious diseases at Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis Children’s Hospital. “You have someone who sneezes, and they have to have X amount of virus in the sneeze. Then there has to be so many drops that land on you.”


“Then you have to touch that part of your hair or clothing that has those droplets, which already have a significant reduction in viral particles,” Dr. Janowski said. “Then you have to touch that, and then touch whatever part of your face, to come into contact with it. When you go through the string of events that must occur, such an extended number of things have to happen just right. That makes it a very low risk.”

Should I worry about doing laundry and sorting clothes? Can I shake viral particles loose from my clothes and send them into the air?
The answer depends on whether you’re doing routine laundry or cleaning up after a sick person.

Routine laundry should not cause worry. Wash it as you normally would. While some types of viruses, like the norovirus, can be tough to clean, the new coronavirus, like the flu virus, is surrounded by a fatty membrane that is vulnerable to soap. Washing your clothes in regular laundry detergent, following the fabric instructions, followed by a stint in the dryer is more than enough to remove the virus — if it was even there in the first place.

“We do know that viruses can deposit on clothing (from droplets) and then be shaken loose into the air with movement, but you would need a lot of viruses for this to be a concern, far more than a typical person would encounter while going for a walk outdoors or going to a grocery store,” Dr. Marr said.

The exception is if you are in close contact with a sick person. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you wear gloves when cleaning up after someone who is sick, and take care not to shake laundry and bedding. Use the warmest water setting possible and dry completely. You can mix laundry from an ill person with the rest of the household load. But just leaving laundry to sit for a while also reduces risk, because the virus will dry out and decay. “We know these types of viruses tend to decay faster on fabric than on hard, solid surfaces like steel or plastic,” said Dr. Marr.

So how long can the virus remain viable on fabric and other surfaces?
Most of what we know about how long this novel coronavirus lives on surfaces comes from an important study published in The New England Journal of Medicine in March. The study found that the virus can survive, under ideal conditions, up to three days on hard metal surfaces and plastic and up to 24 hours on cardboard.

But the study did not look at fabric. Still, most virus experts believe that the cardboard research offers clues about how the virus probably behaves on fabric. The absorbent, natural fibers in the cardboard appeared to cause the virus to dry up more quickly than it does on hard surfaces. The fibers in fabric would be likely to produce a similar effect.

A 2005 study of the virus that causes SARS, another form of coronavirus, provides further reassurance. In that study, researchers tested increasingly large amounts of viral samples on paper and on a cotton gown. Depending on the concentration of the virus, it took five minutes, three hours or 24 hours for it to become inactive. “Even with a relatively high virus load in the droplet, rapid loss of infectivity was observed for paper and cotton material,” the researchers concluded.

Should I be concerned about the mail, packages or the newspaper?
The risk of getting sick from handling mail or packages is extremely low and, at this point, only theoretical. There are no documented cases of someone getting sick from opening a package or reading a newspaper.

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take precautions. After handling mail or packages or reading the newspaper, dispose of the packaging and wash your hands. If you still feel especially anxious about it, take guidance from the New England Journal study and just let mail and packages sit for 24 hours before handling them.

How much should I worry about contamination if I go outside to walk the dog or exercise?
Your chances of catching the virus when you go outdoors is extremely low, provided you’re keeping a safe distance from others.

“Outdoors is safe, and there is certainly no cloud of virus-laden droplets hanging around,” said Lidia Morawska, professor and director of the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia.

“Firstly, any infectious droplets exhaled outside would be quickly diluted in outdoor air, so their concentrations would quickly become insignificant,” Dr. Morawska said. “In addition, the stability of the virus outside is significantly shorter than inside. So outside is not really a problem, unless if we are in a very crowded place — which is not allowed now anyway. It is safe to go for a walk and jog and not to worry about the virus in the air, and there is no need for an immediate washing of the clothes.”

I’ve read that when I get home from a trip outside I should remove my shoes and wipe them down. Should I waste my precious disinfectant wipes on my shoes?
Shoes can harbor bacteria and viruses, but that doesn’t mean they are a common source of infection. A 2008 study commissioned by Rockport Shoes found a lot of gross stuff, including fecal bacteria, on the soles of our shoes. A recent study from China found that among health care workers, half had coronavirus detected on their shoes, which is not unexpected since they worked in hospitals with infected patients.

So what should we do about our shoes? If your shoes are washable, you can launder them. Some readers asked about cleaning the soles of their shoes with a wipe. That is not recommended. Not only does it waste a good wipe (they are still in short supply), but it brings germs that would stay on the sole of your shoe or on the ground directly to your hands.

You can try not to think about what’s lurking on your shoes — or you can have a conversation with your family about becoming a shoe-free household. We covered the pros and cons of shoeless living in our article, “Should You Take Your Shoes Off at Home?” If you have a child who crawls or plays on the floor, a family member with allergies, or someone with a compromised immune system, a shoe-free home might be a good idea for general hygiene.

Dr. Janowski said shoes are not a big worry for contracting coronavirus, but it might make you squeamish if you think about where your shoes have been. “If you want to talk about bacteria, we know bacteria love to live on shoes,” Dr. Janowski said. “You never know what you stepped in.”

Tara Parker-Pope is the founding editor of Well, The Times’s award-winning consumer health site. She won an Emmy in 2013 for the video series “Life, Interrupted” and is the author of “For Better: The Science of a Good Marriage.” @taraparkerpope
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  #45  
Old 04-23-2020, 02:30 PM
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Trying to keep this thread alive for Rusty and the rest of us. Here's some interesting news, that when combined with similar studies in California, shows the fatality rate is probably much lower than previously reported.

Excerpt: "If the 13.9 percent statewide infection rate is accurate, Cuomo said, about 2.7 million New Yorkers have been infected. With roughly 15,500 deaths in the state, that would make the death rate approximately 0.5 percent."

...or about 1 in 200 instead of the 3 or 4 in 100 we've been hearing about

Antibody Test: 1.7 Million NYC Residents Had Coronavirus
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