This day in US Military History-- December 25.

» Site Navigation
Home Page The Villages Maps The Villages Activities The Villages Clubs The Villages Book Healthcare Rentals Real Estate Section Classified Section The Villages Directory Home Improvement Site Guidelines Advertising Info Register Now Video Tutorials Frequently Asked Questions
» Newsletter Signup
» Premium Tower
» Advertisements
» Trending News
» Tower Sponsors




















» Premium Sponsors
» Banner Sponsors
» Advertisements
Closed Thread
Thread Tools
  #91  
Old 03-25-2020, 08:26 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Thumbs up

March 25 | This Day in U.S. Military History

March 25 in US Military History.

Quote:
1634 – The first colonists to Maryland arrive at St. Clement’s Island on Maryland’s western shore and found the settlement of St. Mary’s. In 1632, King Charles I of England granted a charter to George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, yielding him proprietary rights to a region east of the Potomac River in exchange for a share of the income derived from the land. The territory was named Maryland in honor of Henrietta Maria, the queen consort of Charles I. Before settlement began, George Calvert died and was succeeded by his son Cecilius, who sought to establish Maryland as a haven for Roman Catholics persecuted in England. In March 1634, the first English settlers–a carefully selected group of Catholics and Protestants–arrived at St. Clement’s Island aboard the Ark and the Dove. Religious conflict was strong in ensuing years as the American Puritans, growing more numerous in Maryland and supported by Puritans in England, set out to revoke the religious freedoms guaranteed in the founding of the colony. In 1649, Maryland Governor William Stone responded by passing an act ensuring religious liberty and justice to all who believed in Jesus Christ. In 1654, however, the so-called Toleration Act was repealed after Puritans seized control of the colony, leading to a brief civil war that ended with Lord Baltimore losing control of propriety rights over Maryland in March 1655. Although the Calverts later regained control of Maryland, anti-Catholic activity persisted until the 19th century, when many Catholic immigrants to America chose Baltimore as their home and helped enact laws to protect their free practice of religion.
  #92  
Old 03-26-2020, 08:17 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

March 26 | This Day in U.S. Military History

On Iwo Jima on this day in 1945--

Quote:
1945 – On Iwo Jima, the few hundred Japanese troops remaining on the island mount a final suicide attack. They are wiped out by elements of the 5th Marine Division, which have been assigned the task of reducing the last pockets of resistance. About 200 of the Japanese garrison of 20,700 remain alive as prisoners of the marines of US 5th Amphibious Corps. American casualties have been almost 6,000 dead and 17,200 wounded.
  #93  
Old 03-28-2020, 08:39 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Thumbs up

The US Navy created on March 27, 1794.

Quote:
1794 – President Washington and Congress authorized creation of the U.S. Navy. The bill authorizes construction of 6 frigates, including Constitution. In the early stages of the American Revolutionary War, Massachusetts had its own navy. The establishment of a national navy was an issue of debate among the members of the Continental Congress. Supporters argued that a navy would protect shipping, defend the coast, and make it easier to seek out support from foreign countries. Detractors countered that challenging the British Royal Navy, then the world’s preeminent naval power, was a foolish undertaking. Commander in Chief George Washington resolved the debate when he commissioned seven ocean-going cruisers, starting with the schooner USS Hannah, to interdict British supply ships, and reported the captures to the Congress. The Continental Navy achieved mixed results; it was successful in a number of engagements and raided many British merchant vessels, but it lost 24 of its vessels and at one point was reduced to two in active service.
  #94  
Old 03-28-2020, 08:43 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

Dwight D. Eisenhower passes away on March 28, 1969.


Last edited by Taltarzac725; 03-28-2020 at 08:52 PM.
  #95  
Old 03-29-2020, 08:03 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

March 29 | This Day in U.S. Military History


General George S. Patton....

Quote:
1945 – Gen. George S. Patton’s 3rd Army captures Frankfurt, as “Old Blood and Guts” continues his march east. Frankfurt am Main, literally “On the Main” River, in western Germany, was the mid-19th century capital of Germany (it was annexed by Prussia in 1866, ending its status as a free city). Once integrated into a united German nation, it developed into a significant industrial city-and hence a prime target for Allied bombing during the war. That bombing began as early as July 1941, during a series of British air raids against the Nazis. In March 1944, Frankfurt suffered extraordinary damage during a raid that saw 27,000 tons of bombs dropped on Germany in a single month. Consequently, Frankfurt’s medieval Old Town was virtually destroyed (although it would be rebuilt in the postwar period-replete with modern office buildings). In late December 1944, during the Battle of the Bulge, General Patton broke through the German lines of the besieged Belgian city of Bastogne, relieving its valiant defenders. Patton then pushed the Germans east. Patton’s goal was to cross the Rhine, even if not a single bridge was left standing over which to do it. As Patton reached the banks of the river on March 22, 1945, he found that one bridge — the Ludendorff Bridge, located in the little town of Remagen — had not been destroyed. American troops had already made a crossing on March 7 — a signal moment in the war and in history, as an enemy army had not crossed the Rhine since Napoleon accomplished the feat in 1805. Patton grandly made his crossing, and from the bridgehead created there, Old Blood and Guts and his 3rd Army headed east and captured Frankfurt on the 29th. Patton then crossed through southern Germany and into Czechoslovakia, only to encounter an order not to take the capital, Prague, as it had been reserved for the Soviets. Patton was, not unexpectedly, livid.
  #96  
Old 03-30-2020, 07:46 AM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

Happening this day in US Military history--

Quote:
1940 – Japan establishes its own government in conquered Nanking, the former capital of Nationalist China. In 1937, Japan drummed up a rationale for war against Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist China (claiming Chinese troops attacked Japanese troops on maneuvers in a so-called “autonomous” region of China) and invaded northeastern China, bombing Shanghai and carving out a new state, Manchukuo. Money and supplies poured into Free China from the United States, Britain, and France, until the Burma Road, which permitted free passage of goods into China from the West, was closed after a Japanese invasion of Indochina. Making matters more difficult, Chiang was forced to fight on two fronts: one against the Japanese (with U.S. help in the person of Gen. Joseph Stillwell, Chiang’s chief of staff), and another against his ongoing political nemesis, the Chinese Communists, led by Mao Tse-tung. (Although the United States advised concentrating on the Japanese first as the pre-eminent threat, Chiang was slow to listen.) The Japanese proceeded to prosecute a war of terror in Manchukuo. With the capture of Nanking (formerly the Nationalist Chinese capital, which was now relocated to Chungking) by the Central China Front Army in December 1937, atrocities virtually unparalleled commenced. The army, under orders of its commander, Gen. Matsui Iwane, carried out the mass execution of more than 50,000 civilians, as well as tens of thousands of rapes. Nanking and surrounding areas were burned and looted, with one-third of its buildings utterly destroyed. The “Rape of Nanking” galvanized Western animus against the Japanese. On March 30, 1940, Nanking was declared by the Japanese to be the center of a new Chinese government, a regime controlled by Wang Ching-wei, a defector from the Nationalist cause and now a Japanese puppet.
  #97  
Old 03-31-2020, 08:45 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

March 31 | This Day in U.S. Military History

USS Missouri decommissioned on this day in 1992.

Quote:
1992 – USS Missouri (BB-63), the last active American battleship is decommissioned. USS Missouri (BB-63) (“Mighty Mo” or “Big Mo”) is a United States Navy Iowa-class battleship and was the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named in honor of the US state of Missouri. Missouri was the last battleship commissioned by the United States and was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended World War II. Missouri was ordered in 1940 and commissioned in June 1944. In the Pacific Theater of World War II she fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa and shelled the Japanese home islands, and she fought in the Korean War from 1950 to 1953. She was decommissioned in 1955 into the United States Navy reserve fleets (the “Mothball Fleet”), but reactivated and modernized in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and provided fire support during Operation Desert Storm in January/February 1991. Missouri received a total of 11 battle stars for service in World War II, Korea, and the Persian Gulf, and was finally decommissioned on 31 March 1992, but remained on the Naval Vessel Register until her name was struck in January 1995. In 1998, she was donated to the USS Missouri Memorial Association and became a museum ship at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
  #98  
Old 04-01-2020, 08:27 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

April 1 | This Day in U.S. Military History

The April 1 Congressional Medal of Honor mentions are quite interesting. Lots of recipients for capturing of flags in a Civil War battle on April 1, 1865.

A sample of these--

Quote:
SCOTT, JOHN WALLACE
Rank and organization: Captain, Company D, 157th Pennsylvania Infantry. Place and date: At Five Forks, Va., 1 April 1865. Entered service at: ——. Born: 1838, Chester County, Pa. Date of issue: 27 April 1865. Citation: Capture of the flag of the 16th South Carolina Infantry, in hand_to_hand combat.

SHIPLEY, ROBERT F.
Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company A, 140th New York Infantry. Place and date: At Five Forks, Va., 1 April 1865. Entered service at:——. Birth: Wayne, N.Y. Date of issue: 10 May 1865. Citation: Captured the flag of the 9th Virginia Infantry (C.S.A.) in hand-to_hand combat.

SHOPP, GEORGE J.
Rank and organization: Private, Company E, 191st Pennsylvania Infantry. Place and date: At Five Forks, Va., 1 April 1865. Entered service at: Reading, Pa. Birth: Equinunk, Pa. Date of issue: 27 April 1865. Citation: Capture of flag.
Battle of Five Forks - Wikipedia

Last edited by Taltarzac725; 04-01-2020 at 08:55 PM.
  #99  
Old 04-02-2020, 12:12 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Thumbs up

April 2 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Lots of Congressional Medal of Honor awards given for bravery in action on this day in 1865 at the Petersburg, VA.

Quote:
1865 – After a ten-month siege, Union forces under Ulysses S. Grant capture the trenches around Petersburg, Virginia, and Confederate General Robert E. Lee leads his troops on a desperate retreat westward. The ragged Confederate troops could no longer maintain the 40-mile network of defenses that ran from southwest of Petersburg to north of Richmond, the Rebel capital 25 miles north of Petersburg. Through the winter, desertion and attrition melted Lee’s army down to less than 60,000, while Grant’s army swelled to over 120,000. Grant attacked Five Forks southwest of Petersburg on April 1, scoring a huge victory that cut Lee’s supply line and inflicted 5,000 casualties. The next day, Lee wrote to Confederate President Jefferson Davis, “I think it absolutely necessary that we should abandon our position tonight…” Grant’s men attacked all along the Petersburg front. In the predawn hours, hundreds of Federal cannon roared to life as the Yankees bombarded the Rebel fortifications. Said one soldier, “the shells screamed through the air in a semi-circle of flame.” At 5:00 in the morning, Union troops silently crawled toward the Confederates, shrouded in darkness. Confederate pickets alerted the troops, and the Yankees were raked by heavy fire, but the determined troops poured forth and began overrunning the trenches. Four thousand Union troops were killed or wounded, but a northern officer wrote, “It was a great relief, a positive lifting of a load of misery to be at last let at them.” Confederate General Ambrose Powell Hill, a corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia and one of Lee’s most trusted lieutenants, rode to the front to rally his men. As he approached some trees with his aide, two Union soldiers emerged and fired, killing Hill instantly. Hill had survived four years of war and dozens of battles only to die during the final days of the Confederacy. When Lee received the news, he quietly said “He is at rest now, and we who are left are the ones to suffer.” By nightfall, President Davis and the Confederate government were in flight and Richmond was on fire. Retreating Rebel troops set ablaze several huge warehouses to prevent them from being captured by the Federals and the fires soon spread. With the army and government officials gone, bands of thugs roamed the streets looting what was left.

Appomattox campaign - Wikipedia

Last edited by Taltarzac725; 04-02-2020 at 12:18 PM.
  #100  
Old 04-04-2020, 07:46 AM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

April 3 | This Day in U.S. Military History

Harvard gives George Washington an honorary law degree on April 3, 1776.
  #101  
Old 04-04-2020, 07:48 AM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

April 4 | This Day in U.S. Military History

One this day in 1862

Quote:
1862 – U.S.S. Carondelet,. Commander Walke, shrouded by a heavy storm at night, successfully ran past Island No. 10, Mississippi River, and reached Major General John Pope’s army at New Madrid. For his heroic dash through flaming Confederate batteries, Walke strengthened Carondelet with cord-wood piled around the boilers, extra deck planking, and anchor chain for added armor protection. “The passage of the Carondelet,” wrote A. T. Mahan, “was not only one of the most daring and dramatic events of the war; it was also the death blow to the Confederate defense of this position.” With the support of the gunboats, the Union troops could now safely plan to cross the river and take the Confederate defenses from the rear.
  #102  
Old 04-05-2020, 09:48 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

April 5 | This Day in U.S. Military History

April 5 in US Military history--

Quote:
1869 – Daniel Bakeman, the last surviving soldier of the U.S. Revolutionary War, died at the age of 109.
Daniel F. Bakeman - Wikipedia
  #103  
Old 04-06-2020, 10:03 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

April 6 | This Day in U.S. Military History

In 1712, the New York Slave Revolt begins near Broadway in New York City on April 6.

Quote:
1712 – The New York Slave Revolt of 1712 begins near Broadway. The New York Slave Revolt of 1712 was an uprising in New York City of 23 enslaved Africans who killed nine whites and injured another six. More than three times that number of blacks, 70, were arrested and jailed. Of these, 27 were put on trial, and 21 convicted and executed. After the revolt, laws governing the lives of blacks in New York were made more restrictive. African Americans were not permitted to gather in groups of more than three, they were not permitted to carry firearms, and gambling was outlawed. Other crimes, such as property damage, rape, and conspiracy to kill, were made punishable by death. Free blacks were no longer allowed to own land. Slave owners who decided to free their slaves were required to pay a tax of £200, a price much higher than the price of a slave.
  #104  
Old 04-09-2020, 09:57 PM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

April 7 in 1818--

Quote:
1818 – Gen. Andrew Jackson captured St. Marks, FL, from the Seminole Indians. Jackson had gathered his forces at Fort Scott in March 1818, including 800 U.S. Army regulars, 1,000 Tennessee volunteers, 1,000 Georgia militia, and about 1,400 friendly Lower Creek warriors (under command of Brigadier General William McIntosh, a Creek chief). On March 15, Jackson’s army entered Florida, marching down the Apalachicola River. When they reached the site of the Negro Fort, destroyed two years earlier, Jackson had his men construct a new fort, Fort Gadsden. The army then set out for the Mikasuki villages around Lake Miccosukee. The Indian town of Tallahassee was burned on March 31, and the town of Miccosukee was taken the next day. More than 300 Indian homes were destroyed. Jackson then turned south, reaching St. Marks on April 6. At St. Marks Jackson seized the Spanish fort. There he found Alexander George Arbuthnot, a Scottish trader working out of the Bahamas. He traded with the Indians in Florida and had written letters to British and American officials on behalf of the Indians. He was rumored to be selling guns to the Indians and to be preparing them for war. He probably was selling guns, since the main trade item of the Indians was deer skins, and they needed guns to hunt the deer. Two Indian leaders, Josiah Francis, a Red Stick Creek, also known as the “Prophet”, and Homathlemico, had been captured when they had gone out to an American ship flying the British Union Flag that had anchored off of St. Marks. As soon as Jackson arrived at St. Marks, the two Indians were brought ashore and hanged without trial.
Negro Fort - Wikipedia
  #105  
Old 04-10-2020, 07:57 AM
Taltarzac725's Avatar
Taltarzac725 Taltarzac725 is offline
Sage
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 41,978
Thanks: 2,312
Thanked 702 Times in 430 Posts
Default

Gemini 1 launched on April 8, 1964.

Quote:
1964 – Gemini 1 launched. Gemini 1 was the first unmanned test flight of the Gemini spacecraft in NASA’s Gemini program. Its main objectives were to test the structural integrity of the new spacecraft and modified Titan II ICBM. It was also the first test of the new tracking and communication systems for the Gemini program and provided training for the ground support crews for the first manned missions. The spacecraft stayed attached to the second stage of the rocket. The mission lasted for three orbits while test data were taken, but the spacecraft stayed in orbit for almost 64 orbits until the orbit decayed due to atmospheric drag. The spacecraft was not intended to be recovered; in fact, holes were drilled through its heat shield to ensure it would not survive re-entry.
Closed Thread

Tags
day, military, history, december, washington

Thread Tools

You are viewing a new design of the TOTV site. Click here to revert to the old version.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:25 AM.