Publix phasing out plastic bags

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  #46  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:44 AM
Deebaker Deebaker is offline
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Default Plastic bags in my food🤣

I have been using my own grocery bags for years. They are easier to carry into the house and once i got used to it I hated using store bags when I forgot mine. 10 flimsy bags vs 2. The key is to put them back in the car🤪🤪
  #47  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:44 AM
Mmarr Mmarr is offline
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Sounds promising.. but remember paper bags harvest bugs.. Palmetto bugs love paper..
  #48  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:47 AM
Windguy Windguy is offline
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Originally Posted by Bjeanj View Post
I don’t mind bring in reusable bags. I just have to remember to bring them! And then, how many do I bring? If I’m shopping for a lot of things, I suppose eventually I’ll be able to gauge how many I’ll need to bring.
I have a large insulated bag and about seven fold-flat, heavy-duty reusable bags that I bought at Publix. I keep the reusable bags inside my insulated bag so they don’t scatter around in my trunk where I keep them and I don’t have to decide how many to bring. I’ve been using reusable bags for many years and it’s just automatic for me to get them out of the trunk before I enter the store. There have been times when I went into the store to get just a couple of things that I could hand carry, but decided I wanted some other stuff so I walked back to the car to get my bags. More steps for my Fitbit!
  #49  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:47 AM
valuemkt valuemkt is offline
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So far I have not used online grocery shopping. The majority of my shopping today is Publix. I probably average 10 or 12 bags per visit. I doubt I will buy or remember to bring that many bags. or keep that many in two cars etc etc. At 99c per bag and an average of 10 bags per visit, thats an extra 10 bucks. Delivery to my door will cost less than that, eliminate impulse buys and of course save me time. Wonder how all those groceries will be packaged for home delivery ? Cardboard boxes ? Maybe Publix will have to make them available at checkout like Costco does .. This should get interesting.
  #50  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:52 AM
Sharfrfla Sharfrfla is offline
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I agree with you. Publix is working just fine as it is. If it is not broken don’t fix it. Winn-Dixie has bags and hopefully they’ll continue. The only reason I shop at Aldi’s and like it is because the prices are excellent so therefore bringing bags is fine.
  #51  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:54 AM
Brwne Brwne is offline
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Originally Posted by coffeebean View Post
There was a greeter at Publix yesterday informing people that Publix will be phasing out plastic bags. I was told this new policy will be implemented in the next 2-3 months.

Re-usable bags are $.99 each. I received a re-usable bag key ring as a reminder to bring re-usable bags to Publix. It is cute!
We don't throw plastic bags away, after the groceries are put away, they go into a cloth tube and are available to contain wet, leaky refuse. They also work in the garbage can under the sink, eliminating the need to buy bigger, thicker plastic garbage bags. For those with pets, they are easy to carry for the daily "nature walks".

Paper bags will work for some of these activities and the fabric-based reusable bags will not. This brings to mind a question - what are those reusable fabric bags made of?
  #52  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:55 AM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
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Originally Posted by OrangeBlossomBaby View Post
Actually - they donate 10 cents for each of the 3 standard reusable bags to sustainability projects in the community (such as planting trees). They contribute up to $125,000 every year through proceeds of these sales.
So they donate 10cents for every THREE they SELL for $1.00+ each ? So 10c on a $3.00+ sale for an item that cost them likely under 10cents landed for each one. That's better than nothing but falls far below the amount they will save by not purchasing any more plastic bags then SELLING the reusable bags.

Again, I applaud their contribution to the local environment but I can assure you the altruism is based on profits. Not that it shouldn't be, but still it's all for the bottom line and advertising purposes.
  #53  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:01 AM
EdFNJ EdFNJ is offline
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Originally Posted by OrangeBlossomBaby View Post
However, you have to bring the bags yourself. That is all. No one is saying you can't use plastic bags. They're saying you may, but Publix is not going to pay for them. That is all.
And that's the point, the fake altruism they "sell." It's all about the benjamins.
  #54  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:05 AM
theruizs
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We started using the reusable bags about 3 months ago. It was surprising how quickly we got used to it. Change may not always be easy, but in this case I think it is worth the effort.
  #55  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:10 AM
BostonRich BostonRich is offline
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Yeah paper bags are great until it rains. Try putting a paper bag down on the ground for a few seconds when the ground is wet. Everything is going to fall out.

Also, I have to agreed that Wegman's is the absolute best supermarket out there. Miss those 39 cent bananas!
  #56  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:13 AM
Two Bills Two Bills is offline
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Originally Posted by golfing eagles View Post
Yes, and you are welcome to use your dirty cloth bags that you keep in the trunk of your car, that you drive to the store after filling up with gas that comes from the same oil wells, then drive it bag to your garage with the automatic door opener and light that runs on electricity from the same source. And remember all the time you are doing this, China and India are dumping millions of tons of carbon into the atmosphere and laughing at us
The USA is the second worse polluter after China, so who is laughing at who?
  #57  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:14 AM
ColdNoMore ColdNoMore is offline
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Originally Posted by Herchmer View Post
I don't have a dog, but when I walked my "granddogs" I would use the plastic bags that our newspapers were delivered in. Perfect size.

Yep.

I used to go to my local paper's printing press warehouse and they would sell the bags they use to wrap their papers in...by the box (+-200?).

They work perfectly, as they are the correct size and you can easily turn them inside out, with them being long enough to easily tie...after doing your civic duty of picking up your pet's poop.
  #58  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:14 AM
Bonnevie Bonnevie is offline
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I was surprised when I moved here 6 years ago at the number of people who didn't bring their own bags. It had become the norm in my old Florida community.

My son used to work at Albertson's and they offered five cents off if you brought your own bags---and that paltry amount was enough to get people to do it. Someone pointed out, people have no problems doing it at Aldi and Sam'. In England and Ireland on my last trip you had to pay if you wanted a plastic bag.

and if everyone doesn't start becoming a "tree hugger" soon, then our children and grandchildren will pay for it. Even if you re-use them, they are still bad for the environment. You can buy biodegradable poop bags for for less than one cent.

I don't think it's too much to ask. and while they are at it, Publix should go to the same system as Aldi's for cart returns. It only takes 25 cents to get people to bring back a cart.


Americans use 100 billion plastic bags a year, which require 12 million barrels of oil to manufacture.

It only takes about 14 plastic bags for the equivalent of the gas required to drive one mile.

The average American family takes home almost 1,500 plastic shopping bags a year.

According to Waste Management, only 1 percent of plastic bags are returned for recycling. That means that the average family only recycles 15 bags a year; the rest end up in landfills or as litter.

Up to 80 percent of ocean plastic pollution enters the ocean from land.

At least 267 different species have been affected by plastic pollution in the ocean.
100,000 marine animals are killed by plastic bags annually.

One in three leatherback sea turtles have been found with plastic in their stomachs.

Plastic bags are used for an average of 12 minutes

It takes 500 (or more) years for a plastic bag to degrade in a landfill. Unfortunately the bags don't break down completely but instead photo-degrade, becoming microplastics that absorb toxins and continue to pollute the environment.
  #59  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdFNJ View Post
And that's the point, the fake altruism they "sell." It's all about the benjamins.
I think that this has been coming. I didn't know that some areas had businesses already doing it. I am not a greenie, but I think this is a good decision. We really do use too many one use plastics and that does damage and clog things. Most of us lived for years without those plastic bags and we managed.
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  #60  
Old 01-20-2020, 09:17 AM
Brynnie Brynnie is offline
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[QUOTE=CFrance;1710934]Nucky, one of the things we first noticed about using non-disposable grocery shopping bags was how much easier they are on the hands to carry out of the car into the house. And we store them in the trunk of the cars, so no storage issues in the house.


My solution is to keep the cloth bags on the back seat of my car, where I can see them easily. That reminds me to bring them into the store. Works for me!
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