Gas Hot Water Heater Noise

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  #31  
Old 12-09-2019, 11:27 PM
mtdjed mtdjed is offline
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Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
I am assuming that you didn't open the temperature and pressure (T&P) relief valve at the top of the water heater? That is a safety device, which is probably also clogged and non-functional. If you plan to keep a 13 year old water heater for an extended life span, you should test and replace the relief valve if it doesn't work. Lift the metal lever to test it. If it malfunctions, the water heater could experience excessive temperature or pressure and could explode. Just a suggestion, because most people are replacing the water heater after 13 years. Also, 13 years ago, expansion tanks were not required, but they are now. An expansion tank would help to maintain a constant water pressure in your house, which will protect your plumbing fixtures from experiencing excessive water pressure and possible damage.
Very definitely opened pressure relief valve, which is what allowed the tank to start evacuating water. That was recommended because of a closed system as you suggest. My pressure relief valve was replaced several years ago after it successfully responded to a failed expansion tank. My pressure relief valve is not on top but on side about one foot from top. And I doubt if simply opening it, would verify that it would verify that it can functionally protect from excessive temp or pressure.

Also, valve clogging would seem to be more likely lower in the tank where the sediments accumulate as they were in my tank.

I should note that I really was only trying to express my experience in draining the tank, and not trying to express that I know anything else. That was the whole purpose of my initial opening of this chat.

Last edited by mtdjed; 12-09-2019 at 11:38 PM.
  #32  
Old 12-09-2019, 11:44 PM
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Originally Posted by mtdjed View Post
Very definitely opened pressure relief valve, which is what allowed the tank to start evacuating water. That was recommended because of a closed system as you suggest. My pressure relief valve was replaced several years ago after it successfully responded to a failed expansion tank. My pressure relief valve is not on top but on side about one foot from top. And I doubt if simply opening it, would verify that it would verify that it can functionally protect from excessive temp or pressure.

Also, valve clogging would seem to be more likely lower in the tank where the sediments accumulate as they were in my tank.

I should note that I really was only trying to express my experience in draining the tank, and not trying to express that I know anything else. That was the whole purpose of my initial opening of this chat.
It sounds like you have everything covered. But, personnally, I wouldn't feel comfortable maintaining a water heater for much longer than 13 years. I believe that most people never do any maintenance on their water heater and they replace it when it either fails or leaks. That is usually after about 10 -15 years. Fortunately, in The Villages, most water heaters are located in the garage, where they don't do much damage when they leak. But, they really are not very expensive to replace. Good luck.
  #33  
Old 12-10-2019, 11:20 AM
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First , I started this topic and I thank all for your advice. I have a 13 year old water heater that had never been drained and was providing noises upon startup. I decided to drain and replace the drain valve with a 3/4" NPT Ball Valve. Did my homework to check out parts and sizes needed and made sure I had all tools and consumables.
Shut off gas , water inlet valve, opened hot water sink faucets, connected hose to drain valve , opened valve and got nothing. That was not in my plan. Long story shortened, needed to turn faucet off and open water inlet valve. That pressure got things started but slowly. Shortly after reopened faucet and Pressure relief valve and closed water inlet. That got the draining going. Still had to poke around the open drain valve to keep it flowing.

After draining , took off old gate valve and installed ball valve. Noticed a lot of white mushy sand on bottom. Did several short flushes (about 8 ) to get as much out as possible out before refilling. Closed valves, refilled, restarted. No noise and water heated within an hour.

Other than a several gallons of murky water, all of the remaining sediment looked like a white oatmeal. When rubbed, outer coating appeared sudsy and the interior very fine sand. Best to have it gone, and with the new ball valve , future drains will be a snap and coming more often. Don't like the looks of this stuff.
Thank you for the update. You have made a good case for the rest of us to drain the tank at least once a year.
  #34  
Old 12-10-2019, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by retiredguy123 View Post
It sounds like you have everything covered. But, personnally, I wouldn't feel comfortable maintaining a water heater for much longer than 13 years. I believe that most people never do any maintenance on their water heater and they replace it when it either fails or leaks. That is usually after about 10 -15 years. Fortunately, in The Villages, most water heaters are located in the garage, where they don't do much damage when they leak. But, they really are not very expensive to replace. Good luck.
And if yours is GAS - TECO has a energy saving rebate program. When I replaced mine it was close to free!
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  #35  
Old 12-10-2019, 12:16 PM
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Did you know that a tankless heater like those south of 44 require MORE Maintenance than a tank heater?

The maintenance is isolation of the heater via the valves below it and running vinegar through it by a pump for 30 minutes. Unlike Retired guy and most everyone I maintain my water heater. I am surprised that no one seems to be aware of this. With no maintenance expect less than13 years from one, with maintenance expect at least 20.
  #36  
Old 12-10-2019, 05:01 PM
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Did you know that a tankless heater like those south of 44 require MORE Maintenance than a tank heater?

The maintenance is isolation of the heater via the valves below it and running vinegar through it by a pump for 30 minutes. Unlike Retired guy and most everyone I maintain my water heater. I am surprised that no one seems to be aware of this. With no maintenance expect less than13 years from one, with maintenance expect at least 20.
Actually my tankless water heater (Navien) is really easy to do a PM on. Turn off the unit. Turn off water supply valve. Drain it. Remove and clean recirculation and input water filters which unscrew from the bottom. Rinse off and replace.

Open up the panel and remove and clean air intake filter. Reinstall and replace panel.

The only thing that takes any effort at all is flushing out the heat exchanger. But if you do it while you have the recirc and input water filters removed you're already halfway there.
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  #37  
Old 12-11-2019, 04:29 AM
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Oh it is easy, it is even easier to maintain a tank heater. Consider this thread, the vast majority of posters had no idea maintenance is required at all. Most who offered advice had it wrong. To make matters worse some of these guys are engineers and should have known better..
  #38  
Old 12-11-2019, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Toymeister View Post
Oh it is easy, it is even easier to maintain a tank heater. Consider this thread, the vast majority of posters had no idea maintenance is required at all. Most who offered advice had it wrong. To make matters worse some of these guys are engineers and should have known better..
The personal observation of what is inside the tank that comes out when drained is enough to make a believer. It is not only tank maintenance, it is water maintenance. The tank is designed to extract hot water from the top and it is natural for the sediment to settle to the bottom. However, mixing of the layers is occurring.

I actually had difficulty in draining my tank (First time in 12 years) due to the thickness of the sediment clogging the small gate valve. Actually had to open water inlet valve and close inside faucet to pressurize tank to expel the sediment to get the process to start draining. That issue and cautions of drain valve leaks persuaded me to change drain valve to a 3/4 inch ball valve . That will make future draining a snap.
  #39  
Old 12-11-2019, 09:14 AM
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I commend people who want to drain their water heater on a regular basis to increase efficiency and maintain it longer. If you do, I would recommend that you do it on a regular schedule, and be prepared to deal with a leaking valve it that happens. At a minimum, have a plastic or brass cap and washer available to screw onto the end of the drain valve to stop a leak. Also, it is important to periodically make sure that the T&P (temperature and pressure) relief valve is still operating by lifting the metal lever. This is especially important if you do not have an expansion tank. And, if you replace an old water heater, make sure that the contractor installs an expansion tank, even if you didn't have one on the old heater. It will help to maintain a safe and constant water pressure in your house.
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