What to read to a three-year-old

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  #31  
Old 03-06-2020, 08:30 PM
Sunflower1759 Sunflower1759 is offline
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Love this book. Better yet is the audio book read by the author . “ Go The F**k To Sleep”
  #32  
Old 03-06-2020, 09:54 PM
Kirsten Lee Kirsten Lee is offline
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is your Mama a llama?

Corduroy

Chica Chica Boom Boom

King Bidgood's in the Bathtub

Oldies but goodies: The Little House and Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel

Love You Forever is great but you will probably cry at the end
  #33  
Old 03-06-2020, 10:01 PM
Silver Streak Silver Streak is offline
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I love that you want to read to her! There are so many good suggestions here already. The Little Golden Books, Dr. Seuss, Richard Scarry and more. Also, what does she like? My 2 1/2 year old grandson is obsessed with trains, construction equipment and dragons, so I've looked for books featuring those things. Since she's not nearby (my grandson is in Germany) there's always FaceTime or other vidchat options to read to her long distance. You could send her a specific book and then send a video of yourself reading it to her, as another option. I'm thinking I should get my own copy of a couple of my grandson's favorites (there's the one he calls the "round and round book" that's actually called "In The Town All Year Round" that's adorable--nearly all pictures that tell stories about all the characters through the four seasons). Then when he asks me via FaceTime to read it to him, I could sort of do it live. Good luck!
  #34  
Old 03-06-2020, 10:18 PM
WendyS WendyS is offline
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My 1st favorite to read my children and my grandchildren is the little train that could!!
  #35  
Old 03-07-2020, 12:01 AM
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He/she is three. I am betting that child is as smart as you. As a preschool teacher for decades, I say...anything that you think is enjoyable. ANYTHING.

But of course the obvious that can be finished that night and has lovely pictures.
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  #36  
Old 03-07-2020, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by graciegirl View Post
He/she is three. I am betting that child is as smart as you. As a preschool teacher for decades, I say...anything that you think is enjoyable. ANYTHING.

But of course the obvious that can be finished that night and has lovely pictures.
Thanks, GG.


But I have a question. If I put a simple book into two parts (say, one of the Golden Books), would she be able to hold the thought of the first part and recall it on the second night as we read the rest of the book? Someone mentioned The Poky Puppy, and I thought that is a good one because the puppies escape three or four times, come back, don't get dessert. I could stop at the second time they escape, then talk about the two escapes when we continue the book.


I just can't remember if that's appropriate for a three-year-old. She does have a Ph.D. math parent and is starting to evidence logic and draw conclusions, if that's any indication of (other) memory capabilities.


Or should we just read the whole thing and go bake cookies.
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  #37  
Old 03-07-2020, 08:43 AM
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Default The Little Prince

The Little Prince (French: Le Petit Prince, pronounced [lə p(ə)ti pʁɛ̃s]) is a novella by French aristocrat, writer, and aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

Appropriate for any/every age.

john
  #38  
Old 03-07-2020, 11:45 AM
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Thanks, GG.


But I have a question. If I put a simple book into two parts (say, one of the Golden Books), would she be able to hold the thought of the first part and recall it on the second night as we read the rest of the book? Someone mentioned The Poky Puppy, and I thought that is a good one because the puppies escape three or four times, come back, don't get dessert. I could stop at the second time they escape, then talk about the two escapes when we continue the book.


I just can't remember if that's appropriate for a three-year-old. She does have a Ph.D. math parent and is starting to evidence logic and draw conclusions, if that's any indication of (other) memory capabilities.


Or should we just read the whole thing and go bake cookies.
Of course I knew that she would be brilliant. It makes water come to my eyes to think of you snuggling together and reading while Crosby stands guard.
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  #39  
Old 03-07-2020, 11:48 AM
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My favorite book when I was that age was Scuffy the Tugboat.
Oh, my gosh! Scuffy was one of my favorite Little Golden Books! My daughter gave me a Scuffy Christmas tree ornament! I do have a copy of the book and read it to my grandsons, they did not fall in love with it as I did.
  #40  
Old 03-07-2020, 11:54 AM
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Of course I knew that she would be brilliant. It makes water come to my eyes to think of you snuggling together and reading while Crosby stands guard.
Or rather, Crosby hides in another room so she won't try to ride him...


I got The Poky Puppy and some Madeline books, which are different adventures but the same main character. We can talk about the last adventure before going on to the next.
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  #41  
Old 03-07-2020, 11:58 AM
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Thanks, GG.


But I have a question. If I put a simple book into two parts (say, one of the Golden Books), would she be able to hold the thought of the first part and recall it on the second night as we read the rest of the book? Someone mentioned The Poky Puppy, and I thought that is a good one because the puppies escape three or four times, come back, don't get dessert. I could stop at the second time they escape, then talk about the two escapes when we continue the book.


I just can't remember if that's appropriate for a three-year-old. She does have a Ph.D. math parent and is starting to evidence logic and draw conclusions, if that's any indication of (other) memory capabilities.


Or should we just read the whole thing and go bake cookies.
I am guessing that she is a very bright, interesting child. I will echo Winnie-the-Pooh and Wind in the Willows. When reading Winnine-the-Pooh to my 18-month-old grandson (now a high honor roll student), I wanted to stop before he wanted to stop listening. He understood the story as he told his mother about it a few days later. One-sitting books are also good reads. The more a child is read to the more successful they are academically.
  #42  
Old 03-07-2020, 12:06 PM
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My parents never read children's books to me. Amazing that I ended up as an English major.


What books are appropriate to read at bedtime to a three-year-old? I'd like something a little longer than, like, Goodnight Moon, that maybe we could start one night and finish the next or the next.


I read one of her "longer" books to her last month at her home, and she was very interested. It made me think she could handle something longer that might take more than one reading to complete.


Any help appreciated.
I used to shelf a lot of kids' books at East Lake Community Library and had really enjoyed chatting with their Children's Librarian, Cheryl.

You probably would see a lot of books arranged by age and/or grade level at the Villages' area libraries.

I had read some of these to Talia as well as she was quite young when we were in Palm Harbor. And had taken Tal-Tar- and Zac to some of the story times at the Palm Harbor Library.

I did have to get some training in Children's Librarianship while getting my MA at the U of Denver in Librarianship and Information Management. That required reading a lot of kid's books. Most of these were for Young Adults though.
  #43  
Old 03-07-2020, 04:23 PM
ALadysMom ALadysMom is offline
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Your love and consideration of her are adorable! Reading with my children was always one of our favorite times together. Their father even read to them before they were born! I doubted that it would have a positive effect until our oldest became a robotics engineer after “listening to” his Daddy’s nightly readings of excerpts from Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. So, who knows?

I loved Charlotte’s Web; in fact, I just listened to the wonderful Audible version with Meryl Streep. Three may be a little young for that book but please keep it in mind for a delightful choice later.

The most beloved books are those chosen by her. Can you take her to the library or a store and let her guide you? Does she love fairies or critters or dinosaurs or babies or construction equipment? Books with beautiful illustrations are always a good choice for young children since they have something to look at while you read.

My kids loved sing-songy books like Dr. Seuss. ‘The Wheels on the Bus’ book with pull tabs and interactive things that moved were very fun. Richard Scarry’s illustrations are elaborately detailed like coloring books. Some books have things for the child to do as the story progresses like covering the character with a tiny blanket. She might enjoy being part of an activity rather than just passively listening all the time.

The most important thing is just relax and have fun. My wise (dearly departed) Mama always said “kids are little human barometers. They not only reflect the weather outside but also the ‘temperature’ of their most trusted adults.” If you are happy, she will be happy too. So wise!

Your granddaughter is blessed and so are you. Have a fabulous visit!
  #44  
Old 03-07-2020, 04:51 PM
ALadysMom ALadysMom is offline
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Originally Posted by CFrance View Post
Thanks, GG.


But I have a question. If I put a simple book into two parts (say, one of the Golden Books), would she be able to hold the thought of the first part and recall it on the second night as we read the rest of the book? Someone mentioned The Poky Puppy, and I thought that is a good one because the puppies escape three or four times, come back, don't get dessert. I could stop at the second time they escape, then talk about the two escapes when we continue the book.


I just can't remember if that's appropriate for a three-year-old. She does have a Ph.D. math parent and is starting to evidence logic and draw conclusions, if that's any indication of (other) memory capabilities.


Or should we just read the whole thing and go bake cookies.
We did that with our kids, sometimes. Why not try it and see?

She might enjoy books of various lengths, some stories, some picture books, some silly interactive books (lift the flap, pull the tab, turn the wheels) She may even have different preferences on different days like if she’s tired versus if she’s anxious.

Your local library might save you a lot of money and help her to see how many others share your love of reading.
  #45  
Old 03-07-2020, 06:02 PM
Cherylholladay Cherylholladay is offline
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My grandkids loved Goodnight Moon! Short, sweet and interesting to the wee ones!
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